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AFL-CIO Transportation Trades Department Wants To Reform NAFTA And Make It Better Under Trump

Current News - Wed, 06/14/2017 - 12:22

AFL-CIO Transportation Trades Department Wants To Reform NAFTA And Make It Better Under Trump

Transportation Trades Department, AFL-CIO says NAFTA renegotiation must put U.S. jobs, safety first
https://www.ajot.com/news/transportation-trades-department-says-nafta-re...
By: AJOT | Jun 14 2017 at 08:12 AM | International Trade

Aviation, maritime exclusions must remain

Washington, DC - In comments filed yesterday, transportation labor laid out a vision for renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that puts America’s working families first by growing the U.S. economy, protecting American jobs and prioritizing the safety of our cross-border transportation system.

In addition to the comprehensive recommendations of the AFL-CIO, the Transportation Trades Department, AFL-CIO (TTD), called for new policies that enforce strict protections for transportation workers and ensure the industries they work in remain hubs for good, middle-class jobs.

“Our trade agreements, including NAFTA, should not be used to undermine the jobs and rights of transportation employees and the broader U.S. workforce. Not only have promises of greater wealth and more opportunity not come to fruition under NAFTA, but the very rules and regulations designed to keep working people safe have been jeopardized under this agreement,” said Edward Wytkind, President of TTD. “President Trump campaigned on a promise to reform our trade policies. The renegotiation of NAFTA presents a clear opportunity to craft a new agreement that expands and strengthens the American middle class and ensures our transportation system remains the safest in the world.”

Specifically, TTD is calling for any renegotiated version of NAFTA to:

Prohibit bus and truck traffic from Mexico that violates U.S. safety rules including attempts to evade hours of service limits, drug and alcohol testing, and the appropriate credentialing for Mexico-based drivers
Uphold U.S.-backed standards for safety inspections of freight rail locomotives and to prohibit Mexico-based freight train crews from operating trains beyond the border
Preserve Buy America standards and other procurement rules that maximize job creation when U.S. taxpayer dollars are invested in our economy
Require each country to make minimum investments in infrastructure to facilitate economic expansion
Ensure that foreign companies cannot use NAFTA to force the privatization of local transit, rail and other public services
Protect U.S. aviation and maritime sectors from unfair competition by continuing to exclude these industries from the scope of the agreement

“Our trade agreements should be designed to put money in the pockets of America’s working families, not large, multi-national corporations or foreign governments,” Wytkind said. “We call on this Administration to renegotiate NAFTA in a way that will create good jobs for Americans who need them most, grow the economy and uphold strict standards that keep our transportation system and working people safe.”

Tags: NAFTATrumpreforming NAFTAderegulationprivatization
Categories: Labor News

WorkWeek6-13-17 Labor Protest Nazis In Portland And Jeremy Corbyn In SF At Conf To Stop War Sponsored By ILWU 10 & 34

Current News - Wed, 06/14/2017 - 09:46

WorkWeek6-13-17 Labor Protest Nazis In Portland And Jeremy Corbyn In SF At Conf To Stop War Sponsored By ILWU 10 & 34
https://soundcloud.com/workweek-radio/workweek6-13-17-labor-protest-nazi...
WorkWeek looks at the response of trade unionists and union locals opposed to racists and nazis in Portland. Following the murders in Portland on May 26, 2017 of two workers including one who was a member of IATSE Local 17, the neo-nazis and racists tried to have a rally and march in the city. WorkWeek interviews Wyatt McMinn who is Vice President of the Painters Union Local 10 in Portland and Rebecca Lewis who is a member of IATSE 488 and both are supporters of the Internationalist Group.
Next we hear from Jeremy Corbyn, who is the leader of the UK Labor Party who was in San Francisco on October 20, 2007 to speak at a Labor Conference to Stop The War sponsored by the ILWU Local 10 and Local 34.
He discussed the role of the ILWU, internationalism and the fight against US wars in the Middle East and attacks on Iran.
For additional information:
http://www.nwcarpenters.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Anti-white-nation...
https://nwlaborpress.org/2017/06/unions-react-to-the-max-killings/
http://www.wweek.com/news/2017/05/30/organized-labor-groups-pledge-show-...
https://archive.org/details/Johnp-LaborConferenceToStopTheWar477
http://www.transportworkers.org/node/2888
https://sites.google.com/site/laborstopwar/laborconferencetostopthewar
Production of WorkWeek Radio
workweek@kpfa.org
https://soundcloud.com/workweek-radio

Tags: NazisJeremy Corbynlabor solidarityilwuinternationalismlabor defense
Categories: Labor News

WorkWeek6-13-17 Labor Protest Nazis In Portland And Jeremy Corbyn In SF At Conf To Stop War Sponsored By ILWU 10 & 34

Current News - Wed, 06/14/2017 - 09:46

WorkWeek6-13-17 Labor Protest Nazis In Portland And Jeremy Corbyn In SF At Conf To Stop War Sponsored By ILWU 10 & 34
https://soundcloud.com/workweek-radio/workweek6-13-17-labor-protest-nazi...
WorkWeek looks at the response of trade unionists and union locals opposed to racists and nazis in Portland. Following the murders in Portland on May 26, 2017 of two workers including one who was a member of IATSE Local 17, the neo-nazis and racists tried to have a rally and march in the city. WorkWeek interviews Wyatt McMinn who is Vice President of the Painters Union Local 10 in Portland and Rebecca Lewis who is a member of IATSE 488 and both are supporters of the Internationalist Group.
Next we hear from Jeremy Corbyn, who is the leader of the UK Labor Party who was in San Francisco on October 20, 2007 to speak at a Labor Conference to Stop The War sponsored by the ILWU Local 10 and Local 34.
He discussed the role of the ILWU, internationalism and the fight against US wars in the Middle East and attacks on Iran.
For additional information:
http://www.nwcarpenters.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Anti-white-nation...
https://nwlaborpress.org/2017/06/unions-react-to-the-max-killings/
http://www.wweek.com/news/2017/05/30/organized-labor-groups-pledge-show-...
https://archive.org/details/Johnp-LaborConferenceToStopTheWar477
http://www.transportworkers.org/node/2888
https://sites.google.com/site/laborstopwar/laborconferencetostopthewar
Production of WorkWeek Radio
workweek@kpfa.org
https://soundcloud.com/workweek-radio

Tags: NazisJeremy Corbynlabor solidarityilwuinternationalismlabor defense
Categories: Labor News

Global front rising up against Uber through the courts and trade unions

Current News - Wed, 06/14/2017 - 09:44

Global front rising up against Uber through the courts and trade unions

By Rachel Knaebel
13 June 2017

Global front rising up against Uber through the courts and trade unions

https://www.equaltimes.org/global-front-rising-up-against#.WUFUdhQrC-R
Colombian taxi driver protesting against Uber during one of the many demonstrations held around the world to denounce the mobile app that connects customers with private drivers whilst circumventing the regulations governing the trade. Bogota, Colombia, 10 May 2017.
(AP/Fernando Vergara)
Be it in San Francisco or Tokyo, Rio de Janeiro or Paris, Santiago de Chile or Hong Kong, no matter where Uber has been introduced, taxi drivers have responded with protests and, in some cases, legal action. The problem is that the mobile app connecting customers with private drivers, total amateurs in some cases, competes directly with professional taxis, but circumvents all the rules in terms of pay, social security contributions and training.

The legal or political authorities in several cities and countries have decided to place a total or partial ban on Uber services. At the end of 2016, the Brazilian metropolis Rio de Janeiro, for example, passed a law prohibiting all transport platforms of this kind. In the Belgian capital, Brussels, it was the justice system that banned UberPop, the app connecting private drivers with passengers. In France, the UberPop case went all the way to the Constitutional Court, which confirmed, in September 2015, the decision to prohibit the service that had been introduced into the country a year earlier. In Italy, UberPop was banned in 2015. The Italian justice system also banned all of the firm’s other driver services in April 2017, following a complaint filed by Italian taxi drivers.

“But Uber has appealed the decision, so it can’t be implemented as yet. It’s on hold,” Mac Utara, inland transport secretary at the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF), tells Equal Times.

The Federation has recorded legal proceedings or bans against Uber in 49 countries across the globe. Legal action does not always, however, lead to a straightforward ban, and it is often a long, drawn-out process.
“Governments, taxi drivers and taxi firms in many countries are taking a stand against Uber. Uber often loses legal battles. And in some instances the court decisions are strictly implemented,” explains Mac Utara. “It’s a good thing. But it’s even better when actual laws are passed to counter Uber.”

This was the case in Denmark and Bulgaria. Denmark adopted a new law on taxis in March 2017, under which all vehicles wishing to offer transport services must be equipped with security cameras and taximeters. “This effectively excludes Uber drivers who use their own vehicles,” underlines Mac Utara.

When this new regulation was adopted, Uber announced the decision to withdraw its service from Denmark. Bulgaria also passed a special law in October 2015 that led Uber to pull out of the country. The legislation stipulates that only registered companies respecting the regulations governing taxis are allowed to operate in the country.

In Germany, a group of taxi firms filed legal action against Uber as soon as it began operating in the country, in 2014. Two years went by before the German justice system finally, on appeal, banned private drivers from using the application. Since then, only professional taxis can use UberPop to connect with their customers.

“In addition to this court ruling, a number of German cities decided to ban Uber on the basis that its services do not comply with the rules applicable to transport firms. Uber has not opposed these bans,” adds Mira Ball, head of the transport section of the German services trade union federation Verdi (Vereinte Dienstleistungsgewerkschaft).

“But it is important to make a clear distinction between UberPop and other Uber services,” says Herwig Kollar, the lawyer defending German taxis in this legal battle. “UberBlack and UberX services are still operating in Germany, in Berlin and Munich.”

UberBlack is a chauffeur-driven luxury car hire service and UberX a driver service. “And the legal dispute with Uber is still underway. The company contested the ruling, delivered on appeal, banning its service. The procedure has gone all the way to the German federal court, which is awaiting a decision from the Court of Justice of the European Union before issuing its ruling.”

The EU’s highest court has, in fact, been called on by an association of Spanish taxi drivers to decide whether Uber should be classed as a transport service or simply an online platform, as claimed by the California-based company.
On 11 May, the court’s advocate-general published recommendations on the case. They are clear: Uber should be considered as a transport service. And as such, the company can be compelled to respect the licensing and authorisation obligations applicable to transport companies in the various countries of the European Union.

“In 80 per cent of cases, the Court of Justice of the European Union follows the recommendations of the advocate-general,” says Mac Utara.

Uber drivers organise

In addition to the legal battles led by various authorities and taxi drivers, Uber is being fought on another front, by Uber drivers themselves, who are starting to organise to secure better pay and working conditions.

“Since Uber lowered its rates, it has become impossible to make ends meet, even working a 12 or 14 hour day,” says Félix, who has been an Uber driver for two years and is a member of the French VTC (chauffer-driven vehicles) association Actif-VTC.

“After UberPop was banned in France, Uber lowered its rates, arguing that customers had been lost because of the ban and that lower prices were needed to win them back. The other VTC platforms followed suit. Uber also started to take bigger commissions. It was already a tough job two years ago. Now, it’s a disaster.”

In January, the various organisations representing Uber drivers in France initiated negotiations with the company. To no avail. “Uber wasn’t prepared to budge an inch on any of the workers’ demands, be it an increase in rates or a halt to the recruitment of new drivers. Because Uber is now recruiting new drivers every day,” says Félix.

“Uber has never wanted to negotiate. Each time, they would say they couldn’t change the rates because they wouldn’t make any money. In other words, that means they have the right to earn money, but not us.”
“Unfortunately, the Uber platform now sees these negotiating sessions as no more than a semblance of consultations, showing its inability (deliberate or not) to accept any real exchange on the key issue of rates,” adds the CFDT-affiliated transport federation, which took part in the talks. In response to the deadlock, the alliance of trade unions representing Uber drivers in France has finally appealed to the platform’s customers, calling on them to boycott it until the company negotiates.

“There is a general sense of powerlessness against Uber,” says Félix. But his organisation, which has around 200 members, has no intention of giving up. The drivers are in the process of launching their own application and an independent cooperative, so that they can continue to work without having to rely on Uber.

“We have had enough of being dependent on Uber,” concludes the Parisian driver.

Tags: UberDriversglobal workforce
Categories: Labor News

Fleet Memo for June 10 2017

IBU - Wed, 06/14/2017 - 08:50
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Categories: Unions

China: The Women Who Make Ivanka Trump Clothes Can't Afford To Live With Their Children

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 06/13/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Huffington Post
Categories: Labor News

Indonesia: The Women Who Make Ivanka Trump Clothes Can’t Afford To Live With Their Children

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 06/13/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Huffington Post
Categories: Labor News

China: Revealed: reality of life working in an Ivanka Trump clothing factory

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 06/12/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Guardian
Categories: Labor News

Yemen: DNO, Norwegian oil company, refuses to pay workers in Yemen

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 06/12/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: AMN
Categories: Labor News

Madagascar: Dockworkers protest at Madagascan Parliament

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 06/12/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITF Global Union
Categories: Labor News

China: Ivanka Trump stays shtum as Chinese Labor activists arrested investigating her supply chain.

Labourstart.org News - Fri, 06/09/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Huffington Post
Categories: Labor News

USA: Workers understand when the boss says 'I hope you can' it is a directive

Labourstart.org News - Fri, 06/09/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: On Labor
Categories: Labor News

"US Uniting Against War" Jeremy Corbyn Presentation at SF ILWU Local 10 on 10/20/07

Current News - Fri, 06/09/2017 - 10:08

US Uniting Against War
Jeremy Corbyn Presentation on 10/20/07 at SF ILWU Local 10
US Uniting Against War
By Jeremy Corbyn

British Labor MP Jeremy Corbyn reports from the U.S. on the one-day labor conference hosted by the ILWU to build opposition to the war in Iraq and calling for the withdrawal of U.S. troops. It took place in San Francisco on Saturday, October 20, 2007.

The International Longshoremen and Warehouse Men’s Union (ILWU) has a long and very honorable tradition of international solidarity.

Its members are organized in all the ports and docks on the west coast of the U.S. and in Hawaii and are a very powerful force in the U.S. labor movement.

Their legendary leader, the late Harry Bridges, is revered for the battles during the Great Depression, when labor fought for its existence against the overwhelming might of their employers.

It is not an insular or inward-looking organization and has supported struggles and causes all around the world. On his release from prison in 1990, Nelson Mandela made specific reference to the support that ILWU members had given in practical sanctions to the apartheid regime.

They also gave huge financial and real support to the miners in Britain during the 1984-5 strike and, more recently, they gave all support possible to the Liverpool dockers during their heroic struggle to save jobs on the Merseyside docks.

The ILWU exemplifies some of the best traditions of the U.S. labor movement of linking industrial and political actions. Meetings are held in the ILWU “hiring hall” which, in the daytime, acts as an employment exchange for dockworkers and, in the evenings, is a place of debate and discourse. Huge banners adorn the concrete walls opposing the Department of Homeland Security and the war in Iraq and calling for social justice such as free health care in the U.S.

Last weekend, it organized a one-day conference on building opposition to the war in Iraq and calling for the withdrawal of U.S. troops.

It has participated in all of the big anti-war demonstrations since 2003 and is calling for support for next weekend’s coast-to-coast activities demanding peace in Iraq.

The conference was opened by Jack Heyman of ILWU Local 10, who was one of the speakers at the million-plus demonstration in London in 2003. He outlined the reasons why the union had called the conference and was supporting the anti-war effort, with particular focus on the growing crisis of the poorest people in the U.S., lack of funding for schools and increasing attacks on civil liberties through the Department of Homeland Security.

Outside the hall in the tourist centre that is Fisherman’s Wharf of San Francisco, one could see significant numbers of beggars. Indeed, one man whom I met, who was collecting money for soup kitchens, told me that most of the people who were living rough and were making use of the soup kitchens were ex-soldiers. As if to drive the point home, ABC News reported last Saturday that 100,000 U.S. combatants in Iraq were now seeking psychiatric help at home—victims of the war just as much as everybody else.

The speakers at the conference included Cindy Sheehan, who is famous for her camp outside the Bush ranch in Crawford, Texas, and her worldwide campaigning despite her terrible personal loss in Iraq. She personifies the disappointment of many in the United States who voted Democrat in the mid-term elections to wrest control of both the House and the Senate from Bush’s clutches, only to find that, despite votes for the withdrawal of all U.S. troops, Congress has nevertheless gone on to provide Bush with the funds to maintain an occupation of Iraq.

Clarence Thomas, not to be confused with his ultra-conservative namesake in the Supreme Court, but the organizer of the million-plus march in Washington, spoke for many in the black community when he highlighted education and achievement problems, the disproportionate number of blacks in the armed services and the declining living standards of many of the poorest people to pay for a war that is now running into many billions of dollars.

The international flavor of the event was also emphasized by a delegation from the Japanese Railway Workers Union, who described their struggle against privatization and their contribution to try to prevent the militarization of Japan.

The conference was an organization of working-class activists, mainly from the west coast of the U.S., and included a very well-received speech calling for an amnesty for migrant workers to grant them legal status in the U.S. and a very powerful speech from the president of the Oakland Education Association Betty Olson-Jones, who described on behalf of teachers the shortage of funding in schools, again linked to the war.

To many outside the United States, the lack of a public health-care system has always been a cause of bemusement. It was not surprising that one of the campaigns that was represented there was for a proposition of the establishment of a fully funded public health-care system—an exciting development and a far cry from the infamous proposition 13 to cut public taxation which originally propelled Reagan to the U.S. presidency.

The war in Vietnam ended with the loss of a million lives in Vietnam, 55,000 U.S. soldiers’ dead and many thousands more who later committed suicide at home. It is too easy to draw complete parallels with Vietnam, but the cost, loss of life and anger that is being created at home in the U.S. should not be forgotten and is fuelling a major part of the worldwide anti-war movement.

The Turkish parliament voted to send troops across the border into northern Iraq at the weekend despite the entreaties of the United States and many other countries.

The regular bombardment of alleged Kurdish positions in northern Iraq has intensified as the Turkish army moves thousands of troops along the border.

U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice is now putting pressure on the administrations in Baghdad and Irbil to do the job of the Turkish forces for them by attacking Turkish Kurdish positions in Iraq.

Amid all the self-righteous indignation on the part of the U.S. and the governments of Turkey and Iraq, the situation facing many Kurdish people in southeastern Turkey seems to have been forgotten. Full recognition of language and political rights has not yet been won and repeated ceasefires by the PKK have not been followed up with political dialogue by either the government of Turkey or the international community.

Perhaps, instead of heading into another awful conflict, we should look at the underlying causes of Kurdish discontent in south-eastern Turkey and recognize that, unless those rights of expression, assembly and organization are observed, all the fulminating in the world from Rice will not bring about peace or justice.

Jeremy Corbyn is Labor MP for Islington North. He can be contacted at corbynj@parliament.uk

Labor Conference To Stop The War

Jeremy Corbyn At SF Labor Conference To Stop The War
https://archive.org/details/Johnp-LaborConferenceToStopTheWar477

—October 24, 2007

Labor leaders gather in Ssn Francisco to oppose Iraq war
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/10/20/MN0GSTIOK.DT... ^
Posted on October 20, 2007 at 3:29:52 PM PDT by World_Events

Labor leaders from around the world gathered in San Francisco today to call on workers to stand up and take organized action against war in Iraq, saying that politicians can't be counted on to halt the bloodshed.

Several speakers cited the civil rights movement of the 1950s and the anti-Vietnam War movement of the 1960s as models to follow, saying that both achieved change that would not have occurred if matters had been left in the hands of those running the country.

"Until people get off their asses and do something, there won't be a change," Clarence Thomas, past secretary-treasurer of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local 10 and a third-generation ILWU member, told the audience at the local's hall near Fishermen's Wharf.

Jeremy Corbyn, a Labour Party member of Parliament in Britain, cited the staggering number of civilian deaths in the Iraq war and the thousands of returning soldiers who have needed psychiatric care to deal with what they faced during battles in that country.

Corbyn told the audience of about 150 labor officials that the war in Iraq is "a disaster of the grandest scale possible for the people of Iraq and the rest of us."

Thomas, whose local and ILWU local 34 co-hosted the conference, and other speakers said that leaders at the conference should go back to their unions and begin a dialogue resulting in concrete actions that highlight their opposition to the war.

Several speakers mentioned that while billions of dollars funnel into the wars in both Iraq and Afghanistan, there are urgent needs for health care, education, disaster relief and housing that go unmet or underfunded.

2007 Labor Conference To Stop The War And Jeremy Corbyn At ILWU Local 10 on December 27, 2017

2007 Labor Conference To Stop The War

https://sites.google.com/site/laborstopwar/laborconferencetostopthewar

October 20, 2007 at 9:00 am

ILWU Local 10 at 400 North Point St.

San Francisco, California 94133

As the war in Iraq and Afghanistan enters its seventh year, opposition to the war among working people in the United States and the world is massive and growing. The “surge” strategy of sending in more and more troops has become a fiasco for the Pentagon generals, while thousands of Iraqis are killed every month. Before the March 2003 invasion of Iraq, millions marched against the war in Britain, Italy and Spain as hundreds of thousands took to the streets in the U.S. to oppose it. But that didn’t stop the invasion. In the U.S., this “war on terror” has meant wholesale assault on civil liberties and workers’ rights, like the impending imposition of the hated TWIC card for port workers. And the war keeps going on and on, as Democrats and Republicans in Congress keep on voting for it.

As historian Isaac Deutscher said during the Vietnam War, a single strike would be more effective than all the peace marches. French dockworkers did strike in the port of Marseilles and helped bring an end to the war in Vietnam. To put a stop to this bloody colonial occupation, labor must use its power.

The International Longshore and Warehouse Union has opposed the war on Iraq since the beginning. In the Bay Area, ILWU Local 10 has repeatedly warned that the so-called “war on terror” is really a war on working people and democratic rights. Around the country, hundreds of unions and labor councils have passed motions condemning the war, but that has not stopped the war. We need to use labor’s muscle to stop the war by mobilizing union power in the streets, at the plant gates and on the docks to force the immediate and total withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Afghanistan and Iraq.

The clock is ticking. It’s time for labor action to bring the war machine to a grinding halt and end this slaughter. During longshore contract negotiations in the run-up to the Iraq invasion, Bush cited port security and imposed the slave-labor Taft-Hartley Law against the ILWU in collusion with the maritime employers group PMA and with the support of the Democrats. Yet, he did nothing when PMA shut down every port on the U.S. West Coast by locking out longshore workers just the week before!

In April 2003, when antiwar protesters picketed war cargo shippers, APL and SSA, in the Port of Oakland, police fired on picketers and longshoremen alike with their “less than lethal” ammo that left six ILWU members and many others seriously injured. We refused to let our rights be trampled on, sued the city and won. Democratic rights were reasserted a month later when antiwar protesters marched in the port and all shipping was stopped. This past May, when antiwar protesters and the Oakland Education Association again picketed war cargo shippers in Oakland, longshoremen honored the picket line. This is only the beginning.

Last year, Local 10 passed a resolution calling to “Strike Against the War – No Peace, No Work.” The motion emphasized the ILWU’s proud history in opposing wars for imperial domination, recalling how in 1978 Local 10 refused to load bombs for the Pinochet dictatorship in Chile. In the 1980’s, Bay Area dock workers highlighted opposition to South African apartheid slavery by boycotting (“hot cargoing”) the Nedlloyd Kimberly, while South African workers waged militant strikes to bring down the white supremacist regime.

Now Locals 10 and 34 of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union have called for a “Labor Conference to Stop the War” to hammer out a program of action. We’re saying: Enough! It’s high time to use union power against the bosses’ war, independent of the “bipartisan” war party. The ILWU can again take the lead, but action against the war should not be limited to the docks. We urge unions in the San Francisco Bay Area and throughout the country to attend the conference and plan workplace rallies, labor mobilizations in the streets and strike action against the war.

Tags: Jeremy CorbyILWU Local 10imperialismWarsolidarityWar On Iraq
Categories: Labor News

ILWU Local 10 President Edwin Ferris speaks out against corporate greed and the Vallejo ORCEM/VMT project & ILWU Local 10 Sec Treasurer Derrick Muhammad On “Blood Money"

Current News - Thu, 06/08/2017 - 21:19

ILWU Local 10 President Edwin Ferris speaks out against corporate greed and the Vallejo ORCEM/VMT project And ILWU Local 10 Sec Treasurer Derrick Muhammad On “Blood Money"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIVqsWSb23w
APublished on Jun 1, 2017
This is the powerful 2-minute statement from Edwin Ferris, President, Int’l Longshore & Warehouse Union, Local 10, at the May 30, 2017, City Council of Vallejo meeting. He spoke on the long history of ILWU in the Bay Area on- and off-loading ships, barges and rail cars. He told the City Council neither VMT or Orcem had ever contacted them. But stated that this detail was secondary to health of the vulnerable.
The people of Vallejo thank the ILWU-10 for their work on our behalf. And the volunteers of Fresh Air Vallejo would like to thank all of the organizations who have endorsed our research and eduction efforts for the past 20 months. Other great speakers on May 30th included the Sierra Club, Audubon Society, Migrante Napa-Solano and Voices of Vallejo as well as almost 100 individuals. To view the entire proceeding, please click on the City link and scroll down to the meeting date. Public comment start at 7pm and lasted until 11:30pm.
ILWU 10 Union voices opposition to Vallego VMT/Orcem project
http://www.timesheraldonline.com/…/…/20170510/NEWS/170519987
Edwin Ferris, president of the San Francisco-based International Longshore and Warehouse Union 10, speaks during a Wednesday morning news conference. Ferris announced the union is opposed to the Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Americas project proposed for development in south Vallejo. Residents opposed to the project stand behind Ferris. John Glidden — Times-Herald
By John Glidden, Vallejo Times-Herald
POSTED: 05/10/17, 6:08 PM PDT | UPDATED: 3 WEEKS, 6 DAYS AGO0 COMMENTS
A citizen group opposed to a proposed project in south Vallejo picked up support Wednesday from the San Francisco-based International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) 10.
About 45 people met outside the locked gates of the old General Mills flour mill on Derr Street to hear the union’s official position regarding the Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Americas project.
“We’re against this proposed project because it endangers the local community,” said Edwin Ferris, president of ILWU Local 10, during a morning news conference. “It will absolutely not bring good paying union jobs.”
Ferris said it was “irresponsible” to open a modern deep-water terminal and an industrial facility producing cement on the 32-acre site.
“The planning commission got it right, 6-1,” he added, causing several in attendance to start clapping and shout ‘yes’ in response.
The commission in early March denied the proposal, citing “quality of life” concerns.
Also in attendance was Solano County Supervisor Monica Brown.
Brown, who represents the area, expressed concern, especially since Grace Patterson Elementary is within a quarter mile of the project.
“This is a gem area, let’s do something positive with it,” she said.
Brown said she’d like to see dorm rooms built for the California State University Maritime Academy or a stadium for the Vallejo Admirals, the city’s professional baseball team.
Peter Brooks, president of Fresh Air Vallejo, the group opposed to the project, said the proposal, most notably the cement facility, will harm nearby residents.
“This community is primarily a minority neighborhood, a low-income neighborhood, already suffering from twice the state average of asthma,” Brooks said.
He said the facility will release a significant amount of dust and other particulate matter which will harm people with asthma.
“Vallejo is open for good, clean business — that employs lots of people,” he added. “That makes Vallejo proud, that doesn’t make Vallejo sick.”
Meanwhile, Jon Riley, executive director of the Napa/Solano Central Labor Council said he wants to see the city offer a fair process to the VMT/Orcem applicants.
Both applicants and supporters of the project have continually asked City Hall to certify a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR).
He also responded to the idea of putting another use at the site.
“No matter what they do with this facility, there is going to be vehicles and truck traffic,” Riley said.
Reached by phone later in the day, Steve Bryan, president of Orcem Americas, expressed surprise at Ferris’ comments. Bryan said those employed with the businesses will receive a “good wage.”
Late last year, Bryan and Danny Bernardini, business manager of the Napa Solano Building & Construction Trades Council, announced the two sides had reached a project labor agreement.
The PLA stipulates a prevailing wage, allows the council to handle any grievances, and determines how local members will be dispatched during the construction of the facility, Bernardini said last December.
Orcem also agreed to card check neutrality with its employees. Such an agreement stipulates an employer will recognize a union as the official bargaining agent for employees.
Bryan said he would like to see a certified FEIR, as well.
“A lot of people out there are confused,” he said. “A certified impact report will help people understand the project better.”
After the planning commission decision, VMT/Orcem filed an appeal.
The Vallejo City Council will meet on Tuesday, May 30 and Thursday, June 1 to hear the appeal. Both meetings are scheduled to begin at 4:30 p.m., with a tentative ending time of about 11 p.m., city officials confirmed recently.
Contact John Glidden at (707) 553-6832.

ILWU Local 10 Secretary Treasurer On “Blood Money”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OkKkWChRQ6A

Published on May 31, 2017
This is the 3-minute statement from Derrick Muhammad, Int’l Longshore & Warehouse Union, Local 10 Secretary and Treasurer, at the May 30, 2017, City Council of Vallejo meeting. A beautifully written speech that not only targets what we need to do now to stop the proposed VMT/Orcem private port and cement project—but also the problems we need to solve next for South Vallejo: Air, Food, Schools, Housing.

The people of Vallejo thank the ILWU-10 for their work on our behalf. And the volunteers of Fresh Air Vallejo would like to thank all of the organizations who have endorsed our research and eduction efforts for the past 20 months. Other great speakers on May 30th included the Sierra Club, Audubon Society, Migrante Napa-Sola

ILWU Local 10 President Edwin Ferris speaks out against corporate greed and the ORCEM/VMT project
This is the powerful 2-minute statement from Edwin Ferris, President, Int’l Longshore & Warehouse…
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ILWU Local 10 President Edwin Ferris speaks out against corporate greed and the Vallejo ORCEM/VMT project & ILWU Local 10 Sec Treasurer Derrick Muhammad On “Blood Money"

Current News - Thu, 06/08/2017 - 21:19

ILWU Local 10 President Edwin Ferris speaks out against corporate greed and the Vallejo ORCEM/VMT project And ILWU Local 10 Sec Treasurer Derrick Muhammad On “Blood Money"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIVqsWSb23w
APublished on Jun 1, 2017
This is the powerful 2-minute statement from Edwin Ferris, President, Int’l Longshore & Warehouse Union, Local 10, at the May 30, 2017, City Council of Vallejo meeting. He spoke on the long history of ILWU in the Bay Area on- and off-loading ships, barges and rail cars. He told the City Council neither VMT or Orcem had ever contacted them. But stated that this detail was secondary to health of the vulnerable.
The people of Vallejo thank the ILWU-10 for their work on our behalf. And the volunteers of Fresh Air Vallejo would like to thank all of the organizations who have endorsed our research and eduction efforts for the past 20 months. Other great speakers on May 30th included the Sierra Club, Audubon Society, Migrante Napa-Solano and Voices of Vallejo as well as almost 100 individuals. To view the entire proceeding, please click on the City link and scroll down to the meeting date. Public comment start at 7pm and lasted until 11:30pm.
ILWU 10 Union voices opposition to Vallego VMT/Orcem project
http://www.timesheraldonline.com/…/…/20170510/NEWS/170519987
Edwin Ferris, president of the San Francisco-based International Longshore and Warehouse Union 10, speaks during a Wednesday morning news conference. Ferris announced the union is opposed to the Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Americas project proposed for development in south Vallejo. Residents opposed to the project stand behind Ferris. John Glidden — Times-Herald
By John Glidden, Vallejo Times-Herald
POSTED: 05/10/17, 6:08 PM PDT | UPDATED: 3 WEEKS, 6 DAYS AGO0 COMMENTS
A citizen group opposed to a proposed project in south Vallejo picked up support Wednesday from the San Francisco-based International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) 10.
About 45 people met outside the locked gates of the old General Mills flour mill on Derr Street to hear the union’s official position regarding the Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Americas project.
“We’re against this proposed project because it endangers the local community,” said Edwin Ferris, president of ILWU Local 10, during a morning news conference. “It will absolutely not bring good paying union jobs.”
Ferris said it was “irresponsible” to open a modern deep-water terminal and an industrial facility producing cement on the 32-acre site.
“The planning commission got it right, 6-1,” he added, causing several in attendance to start clapping and shout ‘yes’ in response.
The commission in early March denied the proposal, citing “quality of life” concerns.
Also in attendance was Solano County Supervisor Monica Brown.
Brown, who represents the area, expressed concern, especially since Grace Patterson Elementary is within a quarter mile of the project.
“This is a gem area, let’s do something positive with it,” she said.
Brown said she’d like to see dorm rooms built for the California State University Maritime Academy or a stadium for the Vallejo Admirals, the city’s professional baseball team.
Peter Brooks, president of Fresh Air Vallejo, the group opposed to the project, said the proposal, most notably the cement facility, will harm nearby residents.
“This community is primarily a minority neighborhood, a low-income neighborhood, already suffering from twice the state average of asthma,” Brooks said.
He said the facility will release a significant amount of dust and other particulate matter which will harm people with asthma.
“Vallejo is open for good, clean business — that employs lots of people,” he added. “That makes Vallejo proud, that doesn’t make Vallejo sick.”
Meanwhile, Jon Riley, executive director of the Napa/Solano Central Labor Council said he wants to see the city offer a fair process to the VMT/Orcem applicants.
Both applicants and supporters of the project have continually asked City Hall to certify a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR).
He also responded to the idea of putting another use at the site.
“No matter what they do with this facility, there is going to be vehicles and truck traffic,” Riley said.
Reached by phone later in the day, Steve Bryan, president of Orcem Americas, expressed surprise at Ferris’ comments. Bryan said those employed with the businesses will receive a “good wage.”
Late last year, Bryan and Danny Bernardini, business manager of the Napa Solano Building & Construction Trades Council, announced the two sides had reached a project labor agreement.
The PLA stipulates a prevailing wage, allows the council to handle any grievances, and determines how local members will be dispatched during the construction of the facility, Bernardini said last December.
Orcem also agreed to card check neutrality with its employees. Such an agreement stipulates an employer will recognize a union as the official bargaining agent for employees.
Bryan said he would like to see a certified FEIR, as well.
“A lot of people out there are confused,” he said. “A certified impact report will help people understand the project better.”
After the planning commission decision, VMT/Orcem filed an appeal.
The Vallejo City Council will meet on Tuesday, May 30 and Thursday, June 1 to hear the appeal. Both meetings are scheduled to begin at 4:30 p.m., with a tentative ending time of about 11 p.m., city officials confirmed recently.
Contact John Glidden at (707) 553-6832.

ILWU Local 10 Secretary Treasurer On “Blood Money”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OkKkWChRQ6A

Published on May 31, 2017
This is the 3-minute statement from Derrick Muhammad, Int’l Longshore & Warehouse Union, Local 10 Secretary and Treasurer, at the May 30, 2017, City Council of Vallejo meeting. A beautifully written speech that not only targets what we need to do now to stop the proposed VMT/Orcem private port and cement project—but also the problems we need to solve next for South Vallejo: Air, Food, Schools, Housing.

The people of Vallejo thank the ILWU-10 for their work on our behalf. And the volunteers of Fresh Air Vallejo would like to thank all of the organizations who have endorsed our research and eduction efforts for the past 20 months. Other great speakers on May 30th included the Sierra Club, Audubon Society, Migrante Napa-Sola

ILWU Local 10 President Edwin Ferris speaks out against corporate greed and the ORCEM/VMT project
This is the powerful 2-minute statement from Edwin Ferris, President, Int’l Longshore & Warehouse…
YOUTUBE.COM
Boost Post
<936306_469941089744392_1667780729_n.jpg>International Labor Media Network
LikeShow more reactionsComment

Tags: ilwucorporate greedVallejoORCEM/VMT Project
Categories: Labor News

Brazil: Gov't Gets Ready to Roll Back Labour Rights

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 06/07/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Real News Network
Categories: Labor News

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