Feed aggregator

United Parcel Service, Inc. Labor Battle Heats Up: Is Worldport at Risk for a Strike? Teamsters89.com

Current News - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 11:09

United Parcel Service, Inc. Labor Battle Heats Up: Is Worldport at Risk for a Strike? Teamsters89.com
http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2014/04/08/united-parcel-service-i...
UPS (NYSE: UPS) ratified its new master labor contract last June, but the company has yet to be able to implement this contract because several local unions have voted against their individual supplement and rider contracts. This story hasn't garnered much attention from the financial media outlets or during UPS earnings releases. For example, in the fourth-quarter conference call UPS management mentioned this very important detail exactly zero times. Don't let the lack of attention fool you, though -- this issue is one UPS investors should pay very close attention to.

The company's unionized workforce is broken down into different voting districts, and those districts vote on the master contract, and certain locales also vote on riders and supplements that need to be approved before the master contract can go into effect. The company has yet to come to an agreement with its Philadelphia, western Pennsylvania, and Louisville locales, but of the three, Louisville is the most crucial to the company.

Louisville, known as UPS's Worldport, serves as the main distribution hub for all of the company's air package delivery. The facility is immensely important to UPS's business, but Local 89, the union in Louisville, has already voted down its contract twice. The union has now voted a third time, and the votes are to be tallied by April 10. If the contract is voted down a third time, which Local 89 has recommended its members to do, the union can then move to vote for a strike.

In this video, Motley Fool industrial analyst Blake Bos takes a close look at labor relations at UPS. He gives investors key information for what to watch for as this story unfolds, and discusses just how big of an impact a strike in Louisville would have on the company.

Boost your 2014 returns with The Motley Fool's top stock
There's a huge difference between a good stock and a stock that can make you rich. The Motley Fool's chief investment officer has selected his No. 1 stock for 2014, and it's one of those stocks that could make you rich. You can find out which stock it is in the special free report "The Motley Fool's Top Stock for 2014." Just click here to access the report and find out the name of this under-the-radar company.

Tags: IBT 89ups
Categories: Labor News

UPS and Union to Discuss Fate of 250 Queens Drivers

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 05:50

 

NY Daily News, Ginger Adams Otis

April 9, 2014: UPS and members of International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 804 will meet Wednesday to talk about the fate of 250 fired drivers, the Daily News has learned.

The two sides have been at loggerheads since Feb. 26. when a 90-minute walkout prompted the Atlanta-based shipping company to issue termination notices to 250 Queens drivers.

The company and union haven’t spoken since late March. As of this month, 36 drivers have been removed from payroll. The rest will follow as new drivers are trained, a UPS spokesman said.

The company said it has the right to fire employees who engage in illegal walkouts.

The union contends it has the right to walkout when the company doesn’t adhere to proper grievance procedures.

Some UPS customers have come to their drivers’ defense, including Lois Toscano, from Little Neck.

She put in a call to the company’s CEO on Tuesday to tell him about the time her driver, Armin Kaeser, saved her family’s life.

According to Toscano, the UPS driver pulled up to her house on a bitter cold day, when she and her newborn and two toddlers were snuggled inside.

“The house was closed up tight. We were watching TV, and all of us were drowsy, feeling sleepy. He rang the bell, and when I opened the door the first thing he said was, ‘Mrs. Toscano, I smell gas.’”

Turns out her old home was filled with fumes from a leaky pipe, but they crept in so gradually the tired mom didn’t notice.

Now, she’s forever grateful to Kaeser, who like 214 other UPS drivers, is on the chopping block.

“He loves his neighborhood, he always waves when he sees us, he helps the older neighbors get their packages, at Christmas, when presents are being delivered, he rings the doorbell first to make sure the kids aren’t around before he hauls everything up to the door,” she said.

UPS, which employs 6,000 union workers in the city and 16,000 statewide, said the illegal walkout hurt its bottom line.

“UPS takes our service commitments to our customers very seriously. We deliver important packages that include everything from business critical goods to live-saving medicines. We simply cannot allow employee misconduct that jeopardizes our ability to reliably serve our customers and maintain order in our delivery operations,” spokesman Steve Gaut said in a statement.

But for Toscano, at least, UPS is handling the situation all wrong.

“The company should not be firing (Armin) — he’s a poster boy for UPS,” she said.

Issues: UPS
Categories: Labor News, Unions

UK: We need a Europe that puts people first, says TUC

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: TUC
Categories: Labor News

Greece: Greeks go on strike ahead of Merkel visit

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Al Jazeera
Categories: Labor News

Penny Pixler: Loving Sister, Daughter, Aunt, Friend And Fellow Worker

IWW - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 15:42

By the Denver IWW

Penny Lynne-Diane Pixler was born July 9, 1947 to Ivan and Doris (Gardner) Pixler in Spencer, Iowa. She graduated from the University of Iowa with a degree in Psychology in 1969. She also attended George Washington University’s graduate school. Whether she brought her political activism to Washington, D.C. with her or honed it there in the capitol, she actively participated in the anti-Vietnam War movement. After living in Berkeley, Calif. for a time, she moved to Chicago where she continued her activist activities. As a member of the Chicago Women’s Liberation Union (CWLU), she traveled with one of the first American tourist groups allowed in to China after former President Richard Nixon’s opening of relations in 1972.

read more

Categories: Unions

Message for Bay Area visit of National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (2:38) by Mumia Abu-Jamal

Current News - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 13:36

Message for Bay Area visit of National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (2:38) by Mumia Abu-Jamal
www.prisonradio.org/media/audio/mumia/message-national-union-metalworker...
Mphumzi Maqungo, the Treasurer of the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (NUMSA), the largest union in that country, will be here in the Bay Area for May Day speeches. His Bay Area tour is being organized by the May Day Committee in Solidarity with South African Workers. Brother Maqungo will speak at ILWU Local 10 on May Day. 7PM ILWU Local 10, SF, May 1 2014 www.transportworkers.org
These radio essays by Mumia Abu-Jamal are produced twice a week by Prison Radio. www.prisonradio.org

Tags: NUMSA
Categories: Labor News

Fired UPS NYC IBT 804 Drivers Speak Out on MSNBC

Current News - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 13:12

Fired UPS NYC IBT 804 Drivers Speak Out on MSNBC
http://teamsterslocal804.org/story/fired-drivers-speak-out-msnbc
Over 90% in MSNBC Gut Check Poll Say UPS Should Rehire the Fired Drivers in Maspeth

Fired drivers Jairo Reyes and Domenick Dedomenico spoke out on MSNBC's number one rated daytime program. As America hears our story, the calls from the public grow louder for UPS to stop the firings and rehire all fired workers in Maspeth. Over 90% of respondents to MSNBC's Gut Check poll say UPS should rehire the 250 drivers.

Vote in the MSNBC online poll and answer the question: "Do you think that UPS should rehire the 250 fired workers?"

Tags: IBT 804upsretaliationunion busting
Categories: Labor News

The Big Brown empire strikes back-UPS NY Fires 250 IBT 804 Members

Current News - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 12:35

The Big Brown empire strikes back-UPS NY Fires 250 IBT 804 Members
http://socialistworker.org/2014/04/08/big-brown-empire-strikes-back
The Big Brown empire strikes back
Danny Katch reports from New York City on the stakes in a battle pitting one of the world's most powerful corporations against union workers defending their contract.

April 8, 2014

Teamsters of Local 804 protesting outside UPS

FOR AS long as anyone can remember, there has been a cold war at United Parcel Service, between labor and management. This spring, in Maspeth, Queens, a hot war has broken out.

Long-simmering frustrations among UPS drivers exploded into a morning walkout at the Maspeth hub on the morning of February 26. The company responded with termination notices for all 250 workers who participated in the job action.

UPS claims the walkout violated the contract signed between UPS and the union, Teamsters Local 804. In fact, it's management that violates the different sections of the contract on a daily basis, including an agreement that limits mandatory overtime. It was this issue that drivers in Maspeth had spent months trying to resolve through the grievance procedure--to no avail. The walkout happened after they reached their breaking point--hen management fired Jairo Reyes, a respected union activist, on a trumped-up charge of punching in too early.

Since then, the war has escalated. Local 804 released a petition demanding UPS take back the termination letters and got an overwhelming response: 100,000 signatures in less than two weeks. Local elected officials pledged support at a union rally outside the Maspeth hub; New York's elected Public Advocate Leticia James promised to review the city's contracts with UPS if the company didn't rescind the pink slips.

UPS responded by upping the stakes. Three days after the union rally, 20 of the 250 Maspeth drivers were--according to the company--chosen at random and fired, stripped of their company ID and escorted out of the building. The company announced that more drivers who participated in the walkout would face the same fate as soon as their replacements could be trained. When Leticia James paid an unannounced visit to the company's New York City headquarters, she "was shown the door," she says.

Local 804 countered two days later with a fiery press conference on the steps of City Hall that demonstrated the union's considerable support from other unions and politicians. The next day, UPS fired 15 more drivers. The message from the company is clear: it wants to make an example of the Maspeth 250, and it is betting that it can beat the union.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

THE STAKES are high, not only for the fired drivers but for UPS workers across the country and for the entire labor movement. If members of a strong union like Local 804 can be victimized for standing up for their contract and a co-worker, it will send a message to other companies that union contracts no longer matter. "If UPS is allowed to fire us, that would set a precedent," says Maspeth driver Nick Fadael. "I don't think unions would survive."

Local 804 is mounting an energetic campaign against the terminations. Over 100 people showed up to the union's press conference on April 3. Along with dozens of UPS drivers and warehouse workers from hubs across the city were representatives from many prominent New York City unions, including Transport Workers Union Local 100, SEIU 32BJ, Communication Workers of America and the New York State Nurses Association. Also present was the head of the local Teamsters Joint Council, George Miranda, who gave his support to Local 804, but didn't mention the silence of the International union president, James Hoffa Jr.

Most of the time at the press conference was given to elected officials--so many turned up to speak that that Letitia James joked the City Council had a quorum. The purpose of this show of political strength was to warn UPS that New York City can hit the company in the wallet by ending the company's contract with the city, divesting the city employees pension from UPS stock, and ending the company's special deal that reduces parking tickets payments by millions of dollars a year.

Local 804 members have been encouraged by this political support, but there is no guarantee that city officials will follow through on their threats. UPS has surely noticed that Letitia James' boss, Mayor Bill de Blasio, has gotten off to a shaky start when it comes to standing up to rich and powerful interests. For example, de Blasio last monthbacked down from his modest challenge to charter schools after Eva Moscowitz and her wealthy backers attacked him with some negative ads.

If de Blasio backed down so easily to Moscowitz, who owns a few schools, it's hard to imagine he's going to take on UPS, one of the most powerful corporations in the country, without nervously asking himself, "What can Brown do to me?"

UPS has a lot at stake in this fight. This is a company that is a darling of the business community because it excels in the corporate sciences of worker efficiency and relentless management.

At the union press conference, a Maspeth driver named Dominick DeDomenico explained just how low the company is willing to go. Last year, DeDomenico was delivering packages when he was hit by a car and put in a coma for 10 days. This January, DeDomenico finally made it back to work, where he was soon threatened with termination because he wasn't working as quickly as he had before the accident. "I'm up to a one-day suspension," DeDomenico said," because I have to deliver two more packages an hour."

This is the ruthlessness that Local 804 members are up against in their fight to stop the terminations. UPS knows that its relentless management style creates the conditions for workers' rebellion. Across the country this past year, UPS workers angrily voted down their union locals' contracts with the company.

In this tense atmosphere, UPS knows that the Maspeth walkout has the power to inspire more job actions across the country. That's why it wants to send a firm message to victimizing the workers who took part.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

WE HAVE to defend the Maspeth 250 and force the company to back down. That starts by insisting that the drivers were right to walk out on the morning of February 24. The only reason we have unions today is because workers have taken risks to stand up for each other and for future generations. By contrast, the number of strikes today is at an all-time low, and that's a major reason that unions are making concessions and losing members.

This isn't the first time that members of Teamsters Local 804 have taken on UPS and gotten national support. In 1997, Teamsters leader Ron Carey, a former Maspeth driver and Local 804 president, "shut down Big Brown" with a national strike that won the conversion of thousands of part-time jobs into full-time ones. Carey mobilized the union for the strike by sending organizers across the country to prepare workers and win public support with the slogan "Part-time America won't work."

After the strike, UPS got its revenge by working with other corporations, Republican politicians and conservative Teamster officials to get Carey removed from office on trumped-up corruption charges. Carey was replaced by Hoffa Jr., who remains the International president today.

Meanwhile, Local 804 is led by Tim Silvester, a union reformer whose team came to office five years ago on a promise to revive Carey's focus on member education and organization. Hoffa has yet to make a statement about the firings at Maspeth, which sends a dangerous signal to UPS that they have the green light to mess with Local 804.

UPS workers can't afford to let that happen--nor can anyone who supports labor. If UPS is allowed to routinely break its contract and then fire workers who it claims have violated that same contract, it eliminates the point of having contracts and unions. "This is a throwback to the time before unions," said state Sen. Tony Avella at the press conference. "Unions exist to protect workers. UPS seems to have forgotten about that."

Of course, UPS is well aware that unionized workers have contractual rights; they've been scheming for decades to get rid of them. If they succeed in firing the Maspeth 250, they will a big step closer to that goal. On the other hand, if we can win those jobs back, it can show workers at UPS and other companies across the country that you can take a job action and win, which might inspire others to do the same.

UPS has made its latest move. Now it's up to the members and supporters of Local 804 to respond.

Tags: IBT 804
Categories: Labor News

Northeast Ohio Teamsters Organize to Protect Pensions

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 11:55

April 8, 2014: The Northeast Ohio Committee to Protect Pensions (NOCPP) is organizing to defend retirement security.   

The committee was formed at a pension meeting on March 8 in Richfield, Ohio, and consists of retired and active Teamsters working together to protect our Teamster pensions.

“Our first organizing meeting was very focused, commented Mike Walden, a YRC retiree from Akron Local 24. “There were a few TDU guys and other retired Teamsters who volunteered at our Richfield meeting. We are all working together because we know how important it is to protect our pensions.” Walden arranged the meeting at Post 102 of the Army-Navy Club in Akron.

The committee set up a phone tree and email list to inform other Teamsters. Assignments were made and taken to contact Teamster retiree clubs, Teamster locals in the area, and Congressional offices. The plan is to send delegations to various meetings and offices to inform and advocate around the issue. The committee also decided to investigate the cost of securing rental vans or buses for a trip to Washington to lobby and speak out on pension rights.

The committee discussed a number of goals: educating active and retired Teamsters on the pension issues; building unity among all Teamsters to defend our pensions; make sure that Congress understands the impact of potential pension cuts on the economy; engage the media on this issue; work with the AARP and veteran groups; reach out to other unions and members who are also under attack; and continue to research and explore other alternatives and solutions to pension cuts.

The next meeting is scheduled for Saturday, April 12. If you are interested in getting involved in the Northeast Ohio committee or would like to organize a meeting or committee in your local or area, contact TDU.

Issues: Pension and Benefits
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Did UPS workers protest or just stop working?

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 11:28
MSNBCApril 8, 2014View the original piece

Two of those workers fired from UPS, one driver and one protestor, Jairo Reyes and Domenick Dedomenico, join Tamron Hall to discuss unions and the way that UPS handled the protests.

Click here to see the video report.

Issues: UPS
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Do you think that UPS should rehire the 250 workers?

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 11:23
MSNBCApril 8, 2014View the original piece

UPS fired 250 Queens drivers after they walked off the job to participate in a 90 minute protest in defense of a long-time employee who was dismissed.

Gut Check: Do you think that UPS should rehire the 250 workers?

Click here to take the poll.

 

Issues: UPS
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Vermont Bus Drivers Approve Contract, End Strike

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 08:31
Lisa RathkeAssociated PressApril 8, 2014View the original piece

A nearly three-week-long bus drivers' strike in the state's largest county has ended with the approval of a new contract — and a promise of free rides on Friday.

The Chittenden County Transportation Authority board ratified the contract Thursday evening. The bus drivers had overwhelmingly approved the deal earlier in the day.

Read more here from the Associate Press.

Click here to read TDU's story on the strike in the current issue of Teamster Voice.

Categories: Labor News, Unions

Brazil: Shots fired: Rio Olympic Park construction workers clash with security guards

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 04/07/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Guardian
Categories: Labor News

China: Workers rally to defence of labour activist Wu Guijun

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 04/07/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: China Labour Bulletin
Categories: Labor News

USA: Payroll fraud and the shift to contingent employment - robs workers and governments

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 04/07/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The American Prospect
Categories: Labor News

Albertsons, Safeway deal advances

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Mon, 04/07/2014 - 14:10
Pamela RiemenschneiderThe PackerApril 7, 2014View the original piece

The $9.4 billion deal between Safeway and Albertsons owner Cerberus Capital Management is a step closer after no other bidders emerged for the Pleasanton, Calif.-based chain.

The deal would make the combined chain the second largest in the U.S., with 2,400 total stores.

Cincinnati-based Kroger Co. has 2,600, but it could be Kroger Co. that benefits from this deal, especially in markets where Safeway and Albertsons overlap the most, said Pewaukee, Wis.-based retail analyst David Livingston.

“Competitors like Kroger and WinCo could not be happier,” he said. “Kroger will probably be the biggest winner in this whole deal. No one shopped Safeway or Albertsons because of price, quality or service, but more that they were an acceptable alternative for convenience shopping. Kroger will pick up that business from disgruntled customers with all the overlap.”

Safeway and Albertsons, particularly in California where they had the most overlap, were underperformers in their market, he said, typically 20% or more below market average in sales per square foot.

“I expect Safeway sales to decline about 15%, which is normal when a below average operator takes over another below average operator,” he said.

Store closures are inevitable where the companies overlap, particularly in California, Arizona, Dallas and other markets in the West.

“Cerberus has had a long time to develop their plan and should breeze through FTC hearings,” he said. “Just like the last big Cerberus acquisition of Albertsons, we saw stores sold or closed by the bushel.”

- See more at: http://www.thepacker.com/fruit-vegetable-news/Albertsons-Safeway-deal-ad...

The $9.4 billion deal between Safeway and Albertsons owner Cerberus Capital Management is a step closer after no other bidders emerged for the Pleasanton, Calif.-based chain.

The deal would make the combined chain the second largest in the U.S., with 2,400 total stores.

Cincinnati-based Kroger Co. has 2,600, but it could be Kroger Co. that benefits from this deal, especially in markets where Safeway and Albertsons overlap the most, said Pewaukee, Wis.-based retail analyst David Livingston.

“Competitors like Kroger and WinCo could not be happier,” he said. “Kroger will probably be the biggest winner in this whole deal. No one shopped Safeway or Albertsons because of price, quality or service, but more that they were an acceptable alternative for convenience shopping. Kroger will pick up that business from disgruntled customers with all the overlap.”

Safeway and Albertsons, particularly in California where they had the most overlap, were underperformers in their market, he said, typically 20% or more below market average in sales per square foot.

“I expect Safeway sales to decline about 15%, which is normal when a below average operator takes over another below average operator,” he said.

Store closures are inevitable where the companies overlap, particularly in California, Arizona, Dallas and other markets in the West.

“Cerberus has had a long time to develop their plan and should breeze through FTC hearings,” he said. “Just like the last big Cerberus acquisition of Albertsons, we saw stores sold or closed by the bushel.”

- See more at: http://www.thepacker.com/fruit-vegetable-news/Albertsons-Safeway-deal-ad...

The $9.4 billion deal between Safeway and Albertsons owner Cerberus Capital Management is a step closer after no other bidders emerged for the Pleasanton, Calif.-based chain.

The deal would make the combined chain the second largest in the U.S., with 2,400 total stores.

Click here to read more at The Packer.

Issues: Grocery
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Pages

Subscribe to Transport Workers Solidarity Committee aggregator