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USA: Payroll fraud and the shift to contingent employment - robs workers and governments

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 04/07/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The American Prospect
Categories: Labor News

Albertsons, Safeway deal advances

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Mon, 04/07/2014 - 14:10
Pamela RiemenschneiderThe PackerApril 7, 2014View the original piece

The $9.4 billion deal between Safeway and Albertsons owner Cerberus Capital Management is a step closer after no other bidders emerged for the Pleasanton, Calif.-based chain.

The deal would make the combined chain the second largest in the U.S., with 2,400 total stores.

Cincinnati-based Kroger Co. has 2,600, but it could be Kroger Co. that benefits from this deal, especially in markets where Safeway and Albertsons overlap the most, said Pewaukee, Wis.-based retail analyst David Livingston.

“Competitors like Kroger and WinCo could not be happier,” he said. “Kroger will probably be the biggest winner in this whole deal. No one shopped Safeway or Albertsons because of price, quality or service, but more that they were an acceptable alternative for convenience shopping. Kroger will pick up that business from disgruntled customers with all the overlap.”

Safeway and Albertsons, particularly in California where they had the most overlap, were underperformers in their market, he said, typically 20% or more below market average in sales per square foot.

“I expect Safeway sales to decline about 15%, which is normal when a below average operator takes over another below average operator,” he said.

Store closures are inevitable where the companies overlap, particularly in California, Arizona, Dallas and other markets in the West.

“Cerberus has had a long time to develop their plan and should breeze through FTC hearings,” he said. “Just like the last big Cerberus acquisition of Albertsons, we saw stores sold or closed by the bushel.”

- See more at: http://www.thepacker.com/fruit-vegetable-news/Albertsons-Safeway-deal-ad...

The $9.4 billion deal between Safeway and Albertsons owner Cerberus Capital Management is a step closer after no other bidders emerged for the Pleasanton, Calif.-based chain.

The deal would make the combined chain the second largest in the U.S., with 2,400 total stores.

Cincinnati-based Kroger Co. has 2,600, but it could be Kroger Co. that benefits from this deal, especially in markets where Safeway and Albertsons overlap the most, said Pewaukee, Wis.-based retail analyst David Livingston.

“Competitors like Kroger and WinCo could not be happier,” he said. “Kroger will probably be the biggest winner in this whole deal. No one shopped Safeway or Albertsons because of price, quality or service, but more that they were an acceptable alternative for convenience shopping. Kroger will pick up that business from disgruntled customers with all the overlap.”

Safeway and Albertsons, particularly in California where they had the most overlap, were underperformers in their market, he said, typically 20% or more below market average in sales per square foot.

“I expect Safeway sales to decline about 15%, which is normal when a below average operator takes over another below average operator,” he said.

Store closures are inevitable where the companies overlap, particularly in California, Arizona, Dallas and other markets in the West.

“Cerberus has had a long time to develop their plan and should breeze through FTC hearings,” he said. “Just like the last big Cerberus acquisition of Albertsons, we saw stores sold or closed by the bushel.”

- See more at: http://www.thepacker.com/fruit-vegetable-news/Albertsons-Safeway-deal-ad...

The $9.4 billion deal between Safeway and Albertsons owner Cerberus Capital Management is a step closer after no other bidders emerged for the Pleasanton, Calif.-based chain.

The deal would make the combined chain the second largest in the U.S., with 2,400 total stores.

Click here to read more at The Packer.

Issues: Grocery
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Licensing Requirments And Work

IBU - Mon, 04/07/2014 - 11:07
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Categories: Unions

ITF tells Chevron to ‘get head out of the sand’ over Australian project delays

ITF - Mon, 04/07/2014 - 07:20
A global campaign to build awareness over the real reasons for delays and cost overruns at Chevron’s Gorgon LNG project in Australia has been launched by the International Transport Workers’ Federation and the Maritime Union of Australia (MUA).
Categories: Union Federations

Bus drivers in Spring Grove get rid of IBT 776 union, maybe

Current News - Sun, 04/06/2014 - 18:51

Bus drivers in Spring Grove get rid of IBT 776 union, maybe
By GREG GROSS
505-5433/@ydcrime
http://www.yorkdispatch.com/breaking/ci_25454381/bus-drivers-spring-grov...
UPDATED: 03/30/2014 10:12:05 PM EDT

A section of school bus drivers in Spring Grove earlier this month opted to break away from the union that has represented them for about four years.
But a union official questioned the validity of a petition to decertify the union. The petition is said to contain the signatures of the majority of Durham School Services drivers within the district, but Bradley Hockenberry, business agent with Teamsters Local 776, which represents the drivers, said he hasn't seen it.
"Do I think they had the numbers for the petition? I don't believe so," he said.
Because the petition hasn't been released by Durham, the company Spring Grove contracts for bus services, or by the group of workers, Hockenberry said he can't verify the signatures. He added that as far as he knew, the petition hasn't been filed with the National Labor Relations Board.
Anthony Reidel, spokesman for the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, which is representing drivers that circulated the petition, said the petition hasn't been filed with the board but was given to Durham.
The union had been in talks with Durham to renegotiate the drivers' contract, which is set to expire.
Decertification: Carina Noble, spokeswoman for Durham, said the company received the petition earlier this month and verified its signatures.
The company then withdrew recognition of the union and ended contract negotiations, she said.
However, unfair labor practice allegations before the National Labor Relations Board could mean the union is still active, Hockenberry said.
The allegations include perks for anti-union drivers and discrimination against union supporters, he said.
A labor relations board spokesman said he cannot discuss pending cases.
"So the company is not recognizing something that is recognized by the federal government," Hockenberry said. "For us, it's business as usual."
'Done deal': But Reidel said the decertification is final.
According to the foundation, which "believes union affiliation should be completely voluntary," one of the ways to decertify a union is to get the majority of workers to sign a petition stating they don't want union representation.
"Since a majority of the employees signed the petition and the employer withdrew recognition, it's a done deal," Reidel said.
A group of drivers attempted to decertify the union in June 2012, but the unfair labor practice allegations filed by the union blocked that effort, Reidel said.
Contract extension: In February, the union authorized a strike when contract negotiations broke down. The strike was averted when Durham and union officials reached a contract extension agreement, but the extension is slated to end Tuesday.
When asked if there were any plans to strike, Hockenberry said he can't comment.
But with the end of the extension looming, Lisa Smith, spokeswoman for Spring Grove Area School District, said the district has plans in place to provide transportation to 3,500 students who ride buses daily if a strike does happen.
"We're just waiting to see," she said.
Proposals: The district is currently shopping around for transportation services.
During a school board meeting earlier this month, administrators said they received proposals from Durham and five other companies. The board is expected to review the proposals in April.
If a new company is contracted by the district, it could recognize the current union, not recognize it, or allow drivers to hold a vote on whether to organize, Hockenberry said.
But if the union has been decertified, workers will have to wait a year to organize again.
Durham also provides services to four other districts in York County, but none of those bus lots are part of a union, Hockenberry said.
The effort to decertify the union in Spring Grove has not been pretty. It has pitted drivers against drivers, some of whom have been friends for decades, he said.
"It's an ugly situation down there," Hockenberry said.
— Reach Greg Gross at ggross@yorkdispatch.com.

Tags: IBT 776
Categories: Labor News

Korea (South): Union leader Kim Jungwoo is free

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 04/06/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL Global Union
Categories: Labor News

Turkey: Georg Fischer consistently spurns union rights in Turkey

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 04/06/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL Global Union
Categories: Labor News

Qatar: World Cup: Football chiefs 'must act on worker conditions'

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 04/06/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: BBC
Categories: Labor News

Harbor Dental workers vote to join ILWU family

ILWU - Sun, 04/06/2014 - 12:22

On January 30, workers at Harbor Dental and Associates in Harbor City, CA voted overwhelmingly to be represented by ILWU Local 26. The new ILWU Local 26 Bargaining Unit consists of dental hygienists, dental assistants and receptionists. They work at the Harbor Dental facility located in a Harbor City.

This facility has been the preferred dental service provider for many Longshore families for decades. They will work with ILWU Local 26 President Luisa Gratz to get a first contract.

Categories: Unions

NYC IBT 804 Pres Tim Sylvester and Chicago Teachers Union Pres Karen Lewis At 2014 Labor Notes Convention

Current News - Sat, 04/05/2014 - 04:14

NYC IBT 804 Pres Tim Sylvester and Chicago Teachers Union Pres Karen Lewis At 2014 Labor Notes Convention
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvgvXMPh--Q&feature=youtu.be
Karen Lewis, president of the Chicago Teachers Union CTU and Tim Sylvester were two of the opening speakers at the 2014 Labor Notes convention. This was recorded on 4/4/2014
Production of Labor Video Project www.laborvideo.org

Tags: CTUIBT 804solidarityupsunion busting
Categories: Labor News

UPS refuses to back down from firing 250 IBT 804 union workers for walkout that violated labor contract

Current News - Sat, 04/05/2014 - 04:12

UPS refuses to back down from firing 250 IBT 804 union workers for walkout that violated labor contract

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/ups-refuses-back-firing-250-workers-...
UPS said the union that represents the drivers knew it was violating its labor contract with the company by calling for a 90-minute walkout Feb. 26 -- and did it anyway. The company fired 20 workers and will axe the remaining 230 when new drivers are trained.
BY GINGER ADAMS OTIS NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Published: Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 6:51 PM Updated: Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 6:51 PM

ANTHONY DELMUNDO/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
UPS driver Domenick Dedomenico, 40, was out for nearly a year because of a work-related hit-and-run that almost killed him. He showed up to work Wednesday, the day after he told his story to the Daily News, and was greeted with a termination notice.

UPS is sticking to its decision to stamp 250 unionized drivers “Return to Sender.”
The Atlanta-based company said the union that represents the drivers at a Maspeth depot knew it was violating its labor contract with the company by calling for a 90-minute walkout Feb. 26 — and did it anyway.
The company fired 20 workers Monday night and said it won’t back down from its plan to fire the remaining 230 as soon as new drivers are trained.
“They are being removed from payroll due to their participation in the walkout. The company is taking justifiable action to address the local union's and the employees' misconduct,” said Steve Gaut, a UPS spokesman.
The Feb. 26 walkout — sparked by the dismissal of a longtime union activist, Jairo Reyes — had serious consequences for the company’s bottom line, the spokesman noted.
The company maintains that under its agreement with the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 804, it has the right to fire employees who take part in an illegal job action.
“UPS takes our service commitments to our customers very seriously. We deliver important packages that include everything from business critical goods to live-saving medicines,” he said.
“We simply cannot allow employee misconduct that jeopardizes our ability to reliably serve our customers and maintain order in our delivery operations,” he said.
But UPS’s hardline position hasn’t won favor with city politicians, who want the company to back down.
UPS has a $43 million contract with city and state agencies and participates in a city program that saves it millions annually by reducing parking ticket fines.
UPS driver Domenick Dedomenico, 40, delivers some packages at 71-01 Kissena Blvd. in Queens on Tuesday. He is among 250 workers who will be terminated.

City Controller Scott Stringer, who oversees city contracts, said he will be at a press conference Thursday along with Public Advocate Letitia James to urge UPS to drop the strong-arm tactics.
“Nobody should lose their job simply for standing up for their fellow workers, especially at a time when so many New Yorkers are struggling to make ends meet,” he said.
It may be too late to help Domenick DeDomenico, however.
The 40-year-old driver has been struggling to keep up with the UPS pace since he returned to his job in January. He was out for nearly a year due to a work-related hit-and-run that almost killed him.
He showed up to work Wednesday, the day after he told his story to the Daily News, and was greeted with a termination notice. DeDomenico was already on the UPS fire list because he participated in the Feb. 26 walkout, but the company is also trying to dismiss him because of his slower performance, according to his union.
“They’re just going after him, they’re trying to fire him,” said Tim Sylvester, president of Local 804.
But his union contract protects him from immediate dismissal on his performance.
“He has to stay on the job until an arbitrator hears his case,” said Sylvester. “If not for that, he’d be out on the street.”
gotis@nydailynews.com

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/ups-refuses-back-firing-250-workers-...

Tags: upsIBT 804
Categories: Labor News

Federal judge throws out 2 lawsuits brought by Terminal 6 operator, Port of Portland against ILWU and Pacific Maritime Association

Current News - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 23:04

Federal judge throws out 2 lawsuits brought by Terminal 6 operator, Port of Portland against ILWU and Pacific Maritime Association

The judge's opinion noted the union’s stoppages and slowdowns stemmed from an ongoing dispute over whether the ILWU should perform “reefer work” – the plugging, unplugging, maintaining and repairing refrigerated containers. (Beth Nakamura / The Oregonian)

http://www.oregonlive.com/playbooks-profits/index.ssf/2014/04/federal_ju...

By Allan Brettman | abrettman@oregonian.com
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on April 04, 2014 at 5:57 PM

A federal judge overseeing several cases in an ongoing labor dispute at the Port of Portland's Terminal 6 has thrown out a pair of lawsuits brought by the Port and the terminal's operator.
U.S. Dist. Court Judge Michael Simon dismissed an antitrust claim against the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association.
Simon also dismissed the Port's claim that the union and the association had intentionally interfered with the Port's contractual relationships.
However, the judge did not dismiss ICTSI Oregon Inc.'s claim against the association alleging "breach of fiduciary responsibility."
The judge's rulings, issued last week, stemmed from June 2012 lawsuits the ILWU and maritime association filed against ICTSI seeking court enforcement of the parties' collective bargaining agreement. ICTSI countersued the association and union, alleging federal antitrust violations.
Leal Sundet, a longshoreman who resides in Mulino and who serves as ILWU's west coast Committeeman, praised the ruling in news release.
"ICTSI's attack on the decades old collective bargaining relationship between the ILWU and its own employer association, PMA, demonstrates ICTSI's arrogance and complete disregard for the rules of engagement here in the United States," Sundet said.
ICTSI Oregon Inc., which has operated the Port's Terminal 6 container yard since February 2011 under a 25-year lease, is a subsidiary of International Container Services Inc., which is based in The Philippines.
"The Port respectfully disagrees with Judge Simon's recent rulings regarding some of the legal theories asserted by ICTSI Oregon, Inc. and the Port," spokesman Josh Thomas said in a written statement.
"The main claims against the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and its locals remain. The Port and ICTSI Oregon, Inc. are pursuing statutory damage claims against the ILWU asserting the union's illegal boycott and slowdowns at Terminal 6 that began in June 2012.
"Judge Simon has put those damage claims on hold until a final ruling by the National Labor Relations Board on pending unfair labor practice charges. An NLRB administrative law judge issued a decision last August finding the ILWU guilty of committing unfair labor practices and that decision is now on appeal to the full National Labor Relations Board."
While the nearly 50-page opinion digs deeply into legal nuance, rejection of the antitrust claim also clearly described union actions on the waterfront.
"The alleged work stoppages, slowdowns and filing of grievances by ILWU are traditional union activity, done for the purpose of trying to preserve jobs for ILWU workers," the ruling says, concluding the activities are exempt from federal antitrust law.
The opinion noted the union's stoppages and slowdowns stemmed from an ongoing dispute over whether the ILWU should perform "reefer work" – the plugging, unplugging, maintaining and repairing refrigerated containers. Gov. John Kitzhaber last December declared the ILWU should do that work and not the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.
The judge, in rejecting the antitrust claim, noted that Pacific Maritime Association "has more than 70 members who are competitors with one another, and thus does not fall within the classical definition of a 'monopoly' under federal antitrust law." Those members include ICTSI.
In a victory for ICTSI, the judge rules the maritime association "acted in bad faith or unfairly represented" the Terminal 6 operator when neither ICTSI nor the Port were invited to a May 24, 2012 nighttime meeting.
At that meeting, the Coast Labor Relations Committee, comprised of representatives of ILWU and PMA, agreed reefer work at Terminal 6 should be performed by ILWU-represented workers.
"PMA is ICTSI's agent with respect to the administration and management of the (coast labor relations committee) and if PMA is not going to present ICTSI's position, basic notions of fairness and due process require that PMA notify ICTSI of that fact and that ICTSI be given the opportunity to present its own position."
Separately from the court ruling, an independent review requested by Kitzhaber is underway to assess operating conditions and maintenance practices at the container terminal. The review is expected to be completed by the end of April.
-- Allan Brettman

Categories: Labor News

Kazakhstan: Zhanaozen Solidarity campaign brings results

Labourstart.org News - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IUF
Categories: Labor News

Cambodia: Court Denies Bail to Two Activists Detained in Strike Crackdown

Labourstart.org News - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Radio Free Asia
Categories: Labor News

Reg Theriault, Local 10 pensioner and author passes away at age 89

ILWU - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 11:57

On March 1st, hundreds of well-wishers gathered at the Bayview Boat Club on the San Francisco waterfront to offer a final toast to Local 10 pensioner, Reg Theriault, who passed away on February 15 at the age of 89. In addition to being a longshoreman, Theriault was an accomplished author of several books on work and the working class. His most successful book was, How to Tell When You are Tired: A Brief Examination of Work. It was widely praised and won acclaim from labor writer Studs Terkel who called it “a classic.”

Theriault saw work as a basic human condition. His writing gave voice to men and women who perform manual labor. “Most of the people across the face of the earth are doing work, much of it hard work, most of the days of their lives,” wrote Theriault in How to Tell When You are Tired. “By the time most kids are big enough or old enough or educated enough to get their first job, they are already conditioned…to pass beyond liking or disliking work to accepting it as inevitable.”

His other books included, The Unmaking of the American Working Class which was recently translated into Korean and Longshoring on the San Francisco Waterfront. Many books on work and workers have been written by academics. Theriault was a working class intellectual whose perspective was informed by a lifetime of labor. He came from a family of “fruit tramps”—roving, migrant farm workers who sorted and packed fruit for shipment. After a finishing a job, his family might drive hundreds of miles overnight for a job at the next orchard or farm.

Theriault proudly served as a paratrooper during the Second World War and was witness to the Japanese surrender aboard the USS Missouri. After the war, he attended Cal for a few years before dropping out and eventually became a longshoreman in 1959. Theriault served as Vice President of Local 10, caucus delegate and member of the negotiating committee.

He lived in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco for over 40 years. In the late 40’s to the mid-1950s he rubbed shoulders with the era’s radical writers, beatniks and free-thinkers such as Lawrence Ferlinghetti who gathered at City Lights Bookstore, Speck’s, Gino & Carlo’s and Vesuvio’s where Theriault worked as a bartender. He enjoyed diving for Abalone while camping on the Mendocino coast and learned to snow ski with his children when he was 50.

Through his books and as an officer at Local 10, Theriault spent his life fighting for safer and better working conditions, increased benefits for fellow workers and promoting the dignity and value of labor.

He is survived by his three sons, Thomas, Marcus and Raymond and three grandchildren. He was proud of all of his sons who became union members with strong work ethics.

Categories: Unions

Bob Crow: Militant British union leader

ILWU - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 11:51

Thousands of working-class families lined the streets of London’s East End neighborhood on March 24 to honor the passing of Britain’s most militant labor leader of his generation: Bob Crow, who died suddenly at age 52 after a suspected heart attack on March 11. For a dozen years, Crow headed the Rail, Maritime and Transport Union (RMT), where he led many strikes and made no apologies for being an avowed socialist and fighter for the working class.

Like the ILWU, the RMT and Bob Crow celebrated the power of solidarity at home and abroad. He regularly attended ILWU events, including the 2012 Convention in San Diego. International Vice President (Mainland) Ray Familathe attended the funeral on behalf of the ILWU.

“Bob brought so much passion and intelligence to every fight,” said Familathe. “There haven’t been many like him with his talent and commitment, which is why his loss is so stunning and sad.”

The hour-long procession from the East End to City of London Cemetery was observed by local union members, pensioners and supporters from around the world who clapped as the horse-drawn hearse carrying Crow’s casket passed, moving some to throw roses and shed tears while others sang socialist songs.

Alfonso Bahena, from Rio de Janeiro in Brazil, said Mr. Crow’s legacy went far beyond Britain. “Bob Crow spoke at our Congress in Mexico City in 2010 and he was one of the most important people,” said Bahena who represented the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF). “He helped make a lot of policy for the railway workers in Brazil and South America.”

Crow’s loyalty extended to other groups in England that found him willing to support their causes, including coal miners, pensioners, and activists at the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

As the leader of the RMT, he headed many strikes including a recent walk-out by London Underground workers. His tough stance frequently provoked controversy and drew sharp criticism from politicians who resented Crow’s loyalty among workers.

Crow was a passionate supporter of the Millwall Football Club, a working-class team founded in London’s East End near the docks, with a slogan fitting for Crow as well: “No one likes us – and we don’t care.”

“Some politicians called him the most hated man in Britain,” said one woman waiting for the procession.

“But today it looks like he was the most loved.” A memorial honoring Crow’s life and values is slated for London’s May Day celebration.

Categories: Unions

Canadian National Railway Hypocritical about Competition from the U.S.

Railroaded's Blog - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 10:42

It’s mind-boggling lately to listen to Montreal-based Canadian National Railway CEO Claude Mongeau ranting and raving about the proposed new Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act. This is the legislation introduced last week by the federal government to level the playing field between Canada’s 2 rail giants, CN and CP, and Canadian grain farmers whose crops have been piling up at grain elevators because CN and CP have been making more money hauling crude oil, other petroleum products and other dangerous goods.

One of the many elements of the new legislation that upsets Mongeau has to do with extending interswitching limits. Under current legislation, a shipper who is served by only one railway is entitled to transfer its shipments to another railway at a regulated rate if the shipper’s facility is located within a 30-kilometre radius of where the 2 railways connect. The new legislation would extend that limit to 160 kilometres in an effort to increase competition and give shippers access to additional services from other rail companies. Mongeau has said, “This action could hit Canada’s railways by opening their business to unfair poaching by U.S. railways without any reciprocity. Besides causing financial harm to CN, it could drain traffic away from Canadian ports.” (Calgary Herald)

Wait a minute…is this really what the head of CN said? Isn’t CN characterized by the private sector and stock analysts as one of the shining examples of that good old private sector mantra that the “private sector always does it better than the public sector”? And isn’t “competition is good for the marketplace” part of that mantra? After all, it’s competition that helps ensure customers aren’t held hostage by private sector monopolies. For Mongeau to demonize competition from U.S. railways as “poaching”, appears hypocritical. And besides, why shouldn’t U.S.-based Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway (BNSF) have an opportunity to offer a competitive (and perhaps superior) service to some Canadian grain farmers and shippers, especially if that means Canadian grain makes it to market faster and grain farmers get a better price (Edmonton Journal)? Canadian National Railway certainly has done its fair share of moving into the U.S. rail market, including buying out or taking over Illinois Central Corporation; Wisconsin Central; Great Lakes Transportation LLC; and Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Railway. “What’s good for the goose is good for the gander”, isn’t it? It should be noted that many Americans are upset about these takeovers by CN because they claim that CN is not as good a corporate neighbour as the companies they took over.

To further add to the discussion and in case readers have forgotten, Canadian National Railway isn’t as Canadian as one might think. After Canadians spent billions of dollars (in taxes) building the public Canadian National Railway into the largest railway that successfully serviced shippers and passengers across our country, the federal Liberals sold CN Rail to American investors in 1995 for a paltry sum of about $2.2 billion. U.S. financial experts saw this sell off as “The Mother of All Deals” and a huge windfall for the private sector. It was characterized as a “gift” to foreign investors. What do you think now about Mongeau’s rants about that nasty U.S. rail industry potentially “poaching” business in Canada? (See this link for more information on the 1995 privatization of CN.)


Filed under: Canadian National Railway, Claude Mongeau, CN privatization, monopoly
Categories: Labor News

ITF shares women’s leadership learnings at maritime women event

ITF - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 09:08
The ITF was glad to support the World Maritime University’s maritime women: global leadership conference in Sweden this week, which attracted 265 participants from 74 countries.
Categories: Union Federations

4/8 Hong Kong Dock Workers Visit SF

Current News - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 08:48

4/8 Hong Kong Dock Workers Visit SF
Posted by SFLC on March 26, 2014
http://sflaborcouncil.org/2014/03/26/hong-kong-dock-workers-visit-sf/
Title: Hong Kong Dock Workers Visit SF
Location: Unite Here 2 ~ 209 Golden Gate Ave, SF
Link out: Click here
Description: In the spring of 2013, a 40 day strike by 500 dockworkers at the Hong Kong Port aroused massive support in Hong Kong society and throughout the world. The target was one of the world’s richest and most powerful men – oligarch Li Kai-shing. The Hong Kong dockworkers, suffering years of frozen wages and inhumane conditions, divided by a subcontracting system meant to deflect labor unity, with no legal access to collective bargaining, in heart of the global capital’s leading city… struggled and prevailed, giving us a clear view of the power of workers against not merely one boss, but a system that is generating inequality everywhere it spreads. Their tenacity, militancy and ultimate victory provides a moment of inspiration for citizens and workers universally.
Speakers:
• Stephan Chan is a rank & file dockworker, employed as a sub-contracted checker in the Kwai Tung terminal. He helped to organize the Union of Hong Kong Dockers (UHKD) in 2005 and served as its first chairperson. He remains one of the core leaders of the union and played a vital role during the April 2013 strike.
• Loy Wong is an organizing secretary of Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions (HKCTU), with more than 12 years of experience in the trade union. He leads the organizing and support work for unions in the transportation and logistics sector, including the Union of Hong Kong
The San Francisco Event is endorsed by:
Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions, Labor Notes, SF Progressive Workers Alliance, Chinese Progressive Association, SF Jobs with Justice, Inlandboatmen’s Union SF Region-ILWU, UNITE HERE Local 2, Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance (APALA), Empire-Logistics/Supply Chain Group, San Francisco Labor Council
Start Time: 7:00 PM
Date: 2014-04-08

Tags: Hong Kong dock workers
Categories: Labor News

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