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Wobs “instrumental” in getting worker’s job back

IWW - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 21:49

By 6eoff - Boston IWW, January 25, 2016

Pictured are MISU’s John P (recently reinstated), Evan and John M, as well as Genevieve, Geoff, Max and Jon from the Boston IWW.

IWW members returned to aid our friends and fellow workers in the Museum Independent Security Union on 1/23/16. Despite freezing temperatures, our hearts were warmed by a message from John M of MISU, who conveyed his belief that IWW support was “instrumental” in getting unfairly-fired MISU member John P re-hired with no discipline and with back pay. John P was fired by Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts merely for fulfilling his responsibilities as a parent. The outcry that followed (which Boston wobs are proud have helped with) compelled the museum to take John back. The MFA has been forcing working parents out of their jobs and taking a hard line in contract negotiations with MISU, and the battle is not over yet. Please join the Boston IWW and MISU for pickets at the Museum of Fine Arts, Saturdays from 12-2 pm.

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Categories: Unions

Wobbles 2016-1

IWW - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 21:42

Compiled by x344543 - January 26, 2016

The following news items may be of interest to revolutionary industrial workers:

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Categories: Unions

WINE RACK FIRING UNFAIR! - MUST NEGOTIATE WITH THE IWW OR FACE BOYCOTT

IWW - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 21:26

By John Hollingsworth - Ottawa-Outaouais IWW, January 23, 2016

OTTAWA—The Industrial Workers of the World are picketing Wine Rack to defend a member unfairly fired on September 6, 2015.

Our member engaged in his legally-protected right to organize and was publicly engaged in a card-signing campaign by another union in efforts to certify a bargaining unit for Wine Rack locations in Ottawa, Ontario.

Wine Rack is owned by parent company Constellation Brands, a US-based multinational corporation with two billion dollars of profit in 2013. Front-line employees of Wine Rack are paid minimum wage and given only conditional yearly increases lower than the rate of inflation, compounding the difficulties posed by a part-time and unpredictable schedule for workers.

According to the Labour Relations Act, all workers have the right to form, select, and administer a union without interference from the employer. In response to our member’s organizing efforts, Wine Rack manufactured a spurious reason to terminate his employment without following their established disciplinary processes.

The IWW will continue to picket Wine Rack to demand fair treatment for our member until our demand for our member’s reinstatement on the job with back pay is met. All employees deserve to be able to organize without reprisal.

The IWW is calling on Ottawans to not cross our picket line and to respect a boycott of Wine Rack locations until management meets with our union to negotiate.

This is yet another instance of arbitrary firings and disrespect for the Labour Relations Act happening here in Ottawa. Workers can win these fights when they unite and take action. The IWW is a member-run union for all workers and is dedicated to organizing on the job.

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Categories: Unions

On Voting

IWW - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 21:16

By FW W.H. Glazer - Twin Cities IWW, January 20, 2016

Introduction

Every four years, Americans are subjected to a painfully long election cycle. It is January of a presidential election year, and that means that we can anticipate another ten months of mainstream media coverage that manages to simultaneously overwhelm us with its volume and leave us with no novel or useful information (did you know, for example, that Dr. Ben Carson was a rageful and violent nerd growing up in Detroit? Or that Donald Trump is a shameless blowhard whose racist, classist, and sexist rhetoric appeals to a sizeable group of racists, classists, and sexists?). My boss loves to play CNN in the office as background noise, but my proximity to the television means that I know a lot more about Martin O’Malley and Carly Fiorina than I ever needed to.

Inherent in the decision to enact non-stop coverage is an assumption that all of this election stuff really matters, that who you support and ultimately vote for can have a tangible effect on the lives of millions of people. We are taught from a young age that our right to vote is a tremendously precious one, and further that failure to participate in the election process is a failure of civic duty. We are Americans, god dammit, and it is our responsibility to uphold justice and liberty and democracy through our voting process.

From a pragmatic standpoint, there is actually some truth to this idea. It is, from a purely practical point of view, smart to vote for the lesser of two evils. Hillary Clinton is less likely to impose anti-Muslim immigration reforms than is Donald Trump. Bernie Sanders is considerably less scary and objectionable than are the cackling hyenas who comprise the Republican field.

 

In the IWW, though, we can’t only think in terms of pragmatism and practicality. We are a revolutionary anti-capitalist union, and it can be convincingly argued that active participation in electoral politics is not only counterproductive for our organizational goals, but counter-revolutionary. After all, no major party candidate will ever advocate for the dissolution of our capitalist economy and the establishment of a worker run society. Voting third party in a presidential race may be more morally justifiable, but barring tremendous social and political upheaval, a third party candidate will never take the White House.

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Categories: Unions

Workers Power Against Police Brutality and Racist Terror

IWW - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 21:03

By the Life Long Wobbly - January 18, 2016

The Chicago Teachers Step Up – What does it mean?

The decision of the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) to participate in the Black Friday protests against police brutality is an important step forward, advancing both the struggle against the Chicago police department, and allowing the CTU to flex its muscles before the end of its contract. Chicago Teachers voted overwhelmingly to support a strike in their recent strike authorization vote, and if they can win another strike as they did in 2012, it would be an incredibly important victory for the working class around the country. It would show that education workers can fight and win, especially if they have united with the broader working class around issues such as institutional racism.

The simmering rage against Chicago’s blatantly racist, terrorist, secret prison-operating police department provides an important backdrop. US anti-labor law illegitimately limits what workers can strike over; if the teachers go on strike, and demand the removal of police from school campuses, or defunding of the police force, that would make their strike “illegal” in the eyes of the state. Chicago teachers have an important choice. Even if the teachers go on strike and don’t say a word about the police, the CPD is intimately tied to Rahm Emanuel’s austerity regime, and a teachers’ strike could strengthen and build on the movement against police brutality and terror. However, if the teachers do explicitly include anti-police demands in their strike, and stick by them even when threatened with injunction, they could really inspire the rest of the working class in Chicago to mobilize and support them. A victory in that case would also show that workers can successfully take on the system of anti-labor laws in this country, particularly those which declare certain kinds of strikes “illegal”.

Could teachers and other education workers strike to remove police from schools? Nothing could stop them from putting this into their demands. If a teachers union prioritized “cops off campus”, and waged a strike on the level of Chicago in 2012 or Seattle earlier this year, this would be a massive step forward. This would be particularly powerful to the degree that it spread beyond the teachers to include other education workers. Of course, any industrial action for “cops off campus” would meet bitter resistance from the city administration, at the same time that the national media, the Democratic Party, and – most importantly – the national unions would stop at nothing to sabotage this action, and force or cajole the workers into moderating their demands.

This is why militant education workers would have to prepare for this struggle, beginning by consciously identifying with the victims of police brutality, against the police rather than with them. An initiative to strike for “cops off campus” might need years before education workers actually have the strength and organization to pull it off – but the situation in the US over the last several years has also been very fluid, and things could develop much quicker than we might expect.

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Categories: Unions

Greece: Ferries suspended, motorways blocked as Greeks protest pensions reform

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Reuters
Categories: Labor News

Argentina: Government forces halt to LATAM Airlines workers' strike

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Reuters
Categories: Labor News

Taxi Drivers and Air Traffic Controllers Go on Strike in France

Current News - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 13:52

Taxi Drivers and Air Traffic Controllers Go on Strike in France
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/27/business/international/france-strike.h...
By AURELIEN BREEDENJAN. 26, 2016

Taxi drivers set fire to tires on the highway that circles Paris on Tuesday, protesting ride-booking services like Uber.CreditThomas Samson/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

PARIS — Taxi drivers and air traffic controllers in France went on separate but simultaneous strikes on Tuesday, blocking traffic in major cities and disrupting flights at several airports.

The strikes were part of a wider day of protests in the public sector, including hospitals and schools, to call attention to staff reductions, low salaries and education overhauls. More than 100 demonstrations were planned around the country, and CGT, one of the unions that organized the strike, said that 130,000 to 150,000 people participated nationwide.

The police in Paris said that about 2,000 taxis had blocked or delayed traffic around Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports, as well as Porte Maillot, a major intersection in western Paris, and near the Ministry of Economy and Finance.

Some taxi drivers set fire to tires and tried to block the highway that circles the French capital, but the police pushed the demonstrators back with tear gas.

Twenty-four people were arrested, including the driver of an airport shuttle who had tried to force his way through a taxi roadblock near Orly, injuring two people, the French news media reported.

Similar Paris protests in June turned violent, with taxi drivers overturning cars and clashing with the police.

Hundreds of taxi drivers also blocked traffic around airports and train stations in Lille and Toulouse on Tuesday, and they paralyzed traffic in central Marseille.

Taxi unions called the strike to protest ride-booking companies like Uber, which allow people to summon drivers through a smartphone app. Taxi drivers argue that ride-booking companies do not respect certain regulations — like a ban on cruising for fares, which only taxis can legally do — and they say that drivers for ride-booking services have an unfair advantage because they do not have to pay for expensive taxi licenses.

Uber is not the only company to organize ride-booking services in France, but it has become one of the most popular and has become a lightning rod for opposition to such services. The company has faced several legal challenges in the country, and two of its executives are scheduled to go on trial next month on criminal charges of organizing illegal taxi services through the company’s low-cost UberPop service.

UberPop, which enabled drivers without a professional license to pick up paying passengers, has been ruled illegal in France, and it has been discontinued there by Uber.

Prime Minister Manuel Valls held an emergency meeting with taxi union representatives, the interior minister and representatives from the Transportation Ministry on Tuesday.

Mr. Valls’s office said in a statement after the meeting that the government would increase enforcement of the 2014 law that regulates the activity of ride-booking companies, to “put an end to unfair behavior and guarantee the conditions of loyal competition.”

The statement said that Mr. Valls was ready to consult industry and government representatives “on the economic equilibrium of the individual transportation sector and on the potential regulatory evolutions that might follow.”

The consultations will begin in February and will last about three months, the statement said, adding that a “qualified person” would be appointed in the coming days to lead the process.

The statement also said that the government would provide support to individual drivers, but it did not provide any details. Some taxi unions have asked that drivers receive financial compensation from the state for their loss of business and the drop in the value of taxi licenses.

Ahmed Senbel, president of the National Federation of Independent Taxis, said after the meeting that he felt Mr. Valls was fully aware of the problem, but he warned that the announcements might not placate the taxi drivers.

“We’ve been containing it for seven years, but today we can’t contain it anymore,” Mr. Senbel said. Mr. Valls said earlier that the right to demonstrate should be respected but that violence was “unacceptable.”

One in five flights was canceled at the two main Paris airports, and other flights were delayed as air traffic controllers protested job cuts and changes to how their salaries are calculated. Public transportation was not disrupted.

Correction: January 26, 2016
Because of an editing error, an earlier version of this article misstated the number of taxis blocking traffic around Paris airports. It was 2,000, not 2,000,500.

Tags: French Taxi Drivers StrikeAir Traffic Controllers Strike
Categories: Labor News

Taxi Drivers and Air Traffic Controllers Go on Strike in France

Current News - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 13:51

Taxi Drivers and Air Traffic Controllers Go on Strike in France
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/27/business/international/france-strike.h...
By AURELIEN BREEDENJAN. 26, 2016

Taxi drivers set fire to tires on the highway that circles Paris on Tuesday, protesting ride-booking services like Uber.CreditThomas Samson/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

PARIS — Taxi drivers and air traffic controllers in France went on separate but simultaneous strikes on Tuesday, blocking traffic in major cities and disrupting flights at several airports.

The strikes were part of a wider day of protests in the public sector, including hospitals and schools, to call attention to staff reductions, low salaries and education overhauls. More than 100 demonstrations were planned around the country, and CGT, one of the unions that organized the strike, said that 130,000 to 150,000 people participated nationwide.

The police in Paris said that about 2,000 taxis had blocked or delayed traffic around Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports, as well as Porte Maillot, a major intersection in western Paris, and near the Ministry of Economy and Finance.

Some taxi drivers set fire to tires and tried to block the highway that circles the French capital, but the police pushed the demonstrators back with tear gas.

Twenty-four people were arrested, including the driver of an airport shuttle who had tried to force his way through a taxi roadblock near Orly, injuring two people, the French news media reported.

Similar Paris protests in June turned violent, with taxi drivers overturning cars and clashing with the police.

Hundreds of taxi drivers also blocked traffic around airports and train stations in Lille and Toulouse on Tuesday, and they paralyzed traffic in central Marseille.

Taxi unions called the strike to protest ride-booking companies like Uber, which allow people to summon drivers through a smartphone app. Taxi drivers argue that ride-booking companies do not respect certain regulations — like a ban on cruising for fares, which only taxis can legally do — and they say that drivers for ride-booking services have an unfair advantage because they do not have to pay for expensive taxi licenses.

Uber is not the only company to organize ride-booking services in France, but it has become one of the most popular and has become a lightning rod for opposition to such services. The company has faced several legal challenges in the country, and two of its executives are scheduled to go on trial next month on criminal charges of organizing illegal taxi services through the company’s low-cost UberPop service.

UberPop, which enabled drivers without a professional license to pick up paying passengers, has been ruled illegal in France, and it has been discontinued there by Uber.

Prime Minister Manuel Valls held an emergency meeting with taxi union representatives, the interior minister and representatives from the Transportation Ministry on Tuesday.

Mr. Valls’s office said in a statement after the meeting that the government would increase enforcement of the 2014 law that regulates the activity of ride-booking companies, to “put an end to unfair behavior and guarantee the conditions of loyal competition.”

The statement said that Mr. Valls was ready to consult industry and government representatives “on the economic equilibrium of the individual transportation sector and on the potential regulatory evolutions that might follow.”

The consultations will begin in February and will last about three months, the statement said, adding that a “qualified person” would be appointed in the coming days to lead the process.

The statement also said that the government would provide support to individual drivers, but it did not provide any details. Some taxi unions have asked that drivers receive financial compensation from the state for their loss of business and the drop in the value of taxi licenses.

Ahmed Senbel, president of the National Federation of Independent Taxis, said after the meeting that he felt Mr. Valls was fully aware of the problem, but he warned that the announcements might not placate the taxi drivers.

“We’ve been containing it for seven years, but today we can’t contain it anymore,” Mr. Senbel said. Mr. Valls said earlier that the right to demonstrate should be respected but that violence was “unacceptable.”

One in five flights was canceled at the two main Paris airports, and other flights were delayed as air traffic controllers protested job cuts and changes to how their salaries are calculated. Public transportation was not disrupted.

Correction: January 26, 2016
Because of an editing error, an earlier version of this article misstated the number of taxis blocking traffic around Paris airports. It was 2,000, not 2,000,500.

Tags: French Taxi Drivers StrikeAir Traffic Controllers Strike
Categories: Labor News

Taxi Drivers and Air Traffic Controllers Go on Strike in France

Current News - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 13:51

Taxi Drivers and Air Traffic Controllers Go on Strike in France
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/27/business/international/france-strike.h...
By AURELIEN BREEDENJAN. 26, 2016

Taxi drivers set fire to tires on the highway that circles Paris on Tuesday, protesting ride-booking services like Uber.CreditThomas Samson/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

PARIS — Taxi drivers and air traffic controllers in France went on separate but simultaneous strikes on Tuesday, blocking traffic in major cities and disrupting flights at several airports.

The strikes were part of a wider day of protests in the public sector, including hospitals and schools, to call attention to staff reductions, low salaries and education overhauls. More than 100 demonstrations were planned around the country, and CGT, one of the unions that organized the strike, said that 130,000 to 150,000 people participated nationwide.

The police in Paris said that about 2,000 taxis had blocked or delayed traffic around Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports, as well as Porte Maillot, a major intersection in western Paris, and near the Ministry of Economy and Finance.

Some taxi drivers set fire to tires and tried to block the highway that circles the French capital, but the police pushed the demonstrators back with tear gas.

Twenty-four people were arrested, including the driver of an airport shuttle who had tried to force his way through a taxi roadblock near Orly, injuring two people, the French news media reported.

Similar Paris protests in June turned violent, with taxi drivers overturning cars and clashing with the police.

Hundreds of taxi drivers also blocked traffic around airports and train stations in Lille and Toulouse on Tuesday, and they paralyzed traffic in central Marseille.

Taxi unions called the strike to protest ride-booking companies like Uber, which allow people to summon drivers through a smartphone app. Taxi drivers argue that ride-booking companies do not respect certain regulations — like a ban on cruising for fares, which only taxis can legally do — and they say that drivers for ride-booking services have an unfair advantage because they do not have to pay for expensive taxi licenses.

Uber is not the only company to organize ride-booking services in France, but it has become one of the most popular and has become a lightning rod for opposition to such services. The company has faced several legal challenges in the country, and two of its executives are scheduled to go on trial next month on criminal charges of organizing illegal taxi services through the company’s low-cost UberPop service.

UberPop, which enabled drivers without a professional license to pick up paying passengers, has been ruled illegal in France, and it has been discontinued there by Uber.

Prime Minister Manuel Valls held an emergency meeting with taxi union representatives, the interior minister and representatives from the Transportation Ministry on Tuesday.

Mr. Valls’s office said in a statement after the meeting that the government would increase enforcement of the 2014 law that regulates the activity of ride-booking companies, to “put an end to unfair behavior and guarantee the conditions of loyal competition.”

The statement said that Mr. Valls was ready to consult industry and government representatives “on the economic equilibrium of the individual transportation sector and on the potential regulatory evolutions that might follow.”

The consultations will begin in February and will last about three months, the statement said, adding that a “qualified person” would be appointed in the coming days to lead the process.

The statement also said that the government would provide support to individual drivers, but it did not provide any details. Some taxi unions have asked that drivers receive financial compensation from the state for their loss of business and the drop in the value of taxi licenses.

Ahmed Senbel, president of the National Federation of Independent Taxis, said after the meeting that he felt Mr. Valls was fully aware of the problem, but he warned that the announcements might not placate the taxi drivers.

“We’ve been containing it for seven years, but today we can’t contain it anymore,” Mr. Senbel said. Mr. Valls said earlier that the right to demonstrate should be respected but that violence was “unacceptable.”

One in five flights was canceled at the two main Paris airports, and other flights were delayed as air traffic controllers protested job cuts and changes to how their salaries are calculated. Public transportation was not disrupted.

Correction: January 26, 2016
Because of an editing error, an earlier version of this article misstated the number of taxis blocking traffic around Paris airports. It was 2,000, not 2,000,500.

Tags: French Taxi Drivers StrikeAir Traffic Controllers Strike
Categories: Labor News

Taxi Drivers and Air Traffic Controllers Go on Strike in France

Current News - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 13:51

Taxi Drivers and Air Traffic Controllers Go on Strike in France
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/27/business/international/france-strike.h...
By AURELIEN BREEDENJAN. 26, 2016

Taxi drivers set fire to tires on the highway that circles Paris on Tuesday, protesting ride-booking services like Uber.CreditThomas Samson/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

PARIS — Taxi drivers and air traffic controllers in France went on separate but simultaneous strikes on Tuesday, blocking traffic in major cities and disrupting flights at several airports.

The strikes were part of a wider day of protests in the public sector, including hospitals and schools, to call attention to staff reductions, low salaries and education overhauls. More than 100 demonstrations were planned around the country, and CGT, one of the unions that organized the strike, said that 130,000 to 150,000 people participated nationwide.

The police in Paris said that about 2,000 taxis had blocked or delayed traffic around Charles de Gaulle and Orly airports, as well as Porte Maillot, a major intersection in western Paris, and near the Ministry of Economy and Finance.

Some taxi drivers set fire to tires and tried to block the highway that circles the French capital, but the police pushed the demonstrators back with tear gas.

Twenty-four people were arrested, including the driver of an airport shuttle who had tried to force his way through a taxi roadblock near Orly, injuring two people, the French news media reported.

Similar Paris protests in June turned violent, with taxi drivers overturning cars and clashing with the police.

Hundreds of taxi drivers also blocked traffic around airports and train stations in Lille and Toulouse on Tuesday, and they paralyzed traffic in central Marseille.

Taxi unions called the strike to protest ride-booking companies like Uber, which allow people to summon drivers through a smartphone app. Taxi drivers argue that ride-booking companies do not respect certain regulations — like a ban on cruising for fares, which only taxis can legally do — and they say that drivers for ride-booking services have an unfair advantage because they do not have to pay for expensive taxi licenses.

Uber is not the only company to organize ride-booking services in France, but it has become one of the most popular and has become a lightning rod for opposition to such services. The company has faced several legal challenges in the country, and two of its executives are scheduled to go on trial next month on criminal charges of organizing illegal taxi services through the company’s low-cost UberPop service.

UberPop, which enabled drivers without a professional license to pick up paying passengers, has been ruled illegal in France, and it has been discontinued there by Uber.

Prime Minister Manuel Valls held an emergency meeting with taxi union representatives, the interior minister and representatives from the Transportation Ministry on Tuesday.

Mr. Valls’s office said in a statement after the meeting that the government would increase enforcement of the 2014 law that regulates the activity of ride-booking companies, to “put an end to unfair behavior and guarantee the conditions of loyal competition.”

The statement said that Mr. Valls was ready to consult industry and government representatives “on the economic equilibrium of the individual transportation sector and on the potential regulatory evolutions that might follow.”

The consultations will begin in February and will last about three months, the statement said, adding that a “qualified person” would be appointed in the coming days to lead the process.

The statement also said that the government would provide support to individual drivers, but it did not provide any details. Some taxi unions have asked that drivers receive financial compensation from the state for their loss of business and the drop in the value of taxi licenses.

Ahmed Senbel, president of the National Federation of Independent Taxis, said after the meeting that he felt Mr. Valls was fully aware of the problem, but he warned that the announcements might not placate the taxi drivers.

“We’ve been containing it for seven years, but today we can’t contain it anymore,” Mr. Senbel said. Mr. Valls said earlier that the right to demonstrate should be respected but that violence was “unacceptable.”

One in five flights was canceled at the two main Paris airports, and other flights were delayed as air traffic controllers protested job cuts and changes to how their salaries are calculated. Public transportation was not disrupted.

Correction: January 26, 2016
Because of an editing error, an earlier version of this article misstated the number of taxis blocking traffic around Paris airports. It was 2,000, not 2,000,500.

Tags: French Taxi Drivers StrikeAir Traffic Controllers Strike
Categories: Labor News

Taxi drivers take to the streets in day of French strikes

Current News - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 00:11

Taxi drivers take to the streets in day of French strikes
http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/4a8dd502-c3ff-11e5-808f-8231cd71622e.html...
January 26, 2016 8:04 am
Taxi drivers take to the streets in day of French strikes
Adam Thomson in Paris

A striking taxi driver stands in the road and waves down vehicles who approach Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport
France was braced for mass strikes Tuesday as taxi drivers, air traffic controllers, civil servants and teachers demanded more purchasing power, job creation and an end to disruptive competition to traditional industries.
Hundreds of taxi drivers took to the streets of Paris, burning car tyres and blocking routes to the capital’s principal airports in a protest that was expected to spread chaos throughout the capital.
A protest by air traffic controllers prompted France’s Civil Aviation Authority to ask airlines to cancel 20 per cent of their flights in France. BFM TV reported that low-cost airline EasyJet had already cancelled at least 35 flights either arriving or taking off from France. It said that Air France had also cancelled some of its short- and medium-haul flights.
Meanwhile, many of the country’s 5.6m civil servants were expected to stage dozens of strikes and demonstrations around France in protest at what they claim has been a consistent erosion of jobs and pay in recent years.
According to the CGT union, one of the country’s largest, civil servants have lost between 8 per cent and 10 per cent of their purchasing power since 2010. It also says that some 150,000 jobs have been eliminated since 2007.
The strikes stand to add further problems to President François Hollande and his Socialist government as the French head of state battles with stubbornly low economic growth and record-high unemployment. Mr Hollande has promised not to run for re-election in 2017 if he does not manage to reverse the upward trend in unemployment in recent years.
Against the challenging economic environment, the far-right National Front party has made unprecedented gains in recent local elections, and has now established itself as a force to be reckoned with in the run-up to the 2017 presidential contest.
On Tuesday, hundreds of taxi drivers blocked the road at Paris’s Porte Maillot, one of the capital’s principal entry points. By 8.30am, they had already succeeded in blocking one direction of the eight-lane highway. Television images showed the strikers lighting fireworks and dragging metal barriers in front of commuter cars desperate to pass.
Waving flags and burning tyres, the taxi drivers were protesting about the rise of disruptive competition like Uber, the US ride-sharing application, and Heetch, a French ride-sharing app that has become popular among young people.
Taxi drivers complain that the competition has led to a 30 per cent reduction in their revenue in the last six months, and demand that the government take action to stem what they insist is unfair competition.
Among other things, they argue that minicab drivers working with services such as Uber do not have to pay the elevated prices for a regular licence — these have reached as high as €240,000 — and therefore compete under different conditions.
In June last year, police in riot gear used tear gas to break up a protest by taxi drivers, who had all but stopped transport to and from the capital’s airports.
People trying to reach Charles de Gaulle and Orly international airports were caught in the disturbance, causing many to miss their flights. Aéroports de Paris, the airports operator, warned passengers via its website to take public transport as the only means of reaching the terminals.
Singer Courtney Love was one of the many victims of the strike action. After her car was assailed by picketers. Ms Love took to Twitter to urge Mr Hollande, in coarse language, to get to the airport, asking: “Is it legal for your people to attack visitors?”

Tags: French taxi driver strikeMass strike
Categories: Labor News

Taxi drivers take to the streets in day of French strikes

Current News - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 00:11

Taxi drivers take to the streets in day of French strikes
http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/4a8dd502-c3ff-11e5-808f-8231cd71622e.html...
January 26, 2016 8:04 am
Taxi drivers take to the streets in day of French strikes
Adam Thomson in Paris

A striking taxi driver stands in the road and waves down vehicles who approach Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport
France was braced for mass strikes Tuesday as taxi drivers, air traffic controllers, civil servants and teachers demanded more purchasing power, job creation and an end to disruptive competition to traditional industries.
Hundreds of taxi drivers took to the streets of Paris, burning car tyres and blocking routes to the capital’s principal airports in a protest that was expected to spread chaos throughout the capital.
A protest by air traffic controllers prompted France’s Civil Aviation Authority to ask airlines to cancel 20 per cent of their flights in France. BFM TV reported that low-cost airline EasyJet had already cancelled at least 35 flights either arriving or taking off from France. It said that Air France had also cancelled some of its short- and medium-haul flights.
Meanwhile, many of the country’s 5.6m civil servants were expected to stage dozens of strikes and demonstrations around France in protest at what they claim has been a consistent erosion of jobs and pay in recent years.
According to the CGT union, one of the country’s largest, civil servants have lost between 8 per cent and 10 per cent of their purchasing power since 2010. It also says that some 150,000 jobs have been eliminated since 2007.
The strikes stand to add further problems to President François Hollande and his Socialist government as the French head of state battles with stubbornly low economic growth and record-high unemployment. Mr Hollande has promised not to run for re-election in 2017 if he does not manage to reverse the upward trend in unemployment in recent years.
Against the challenging economic environment, the far-right National Front party has made unprecedented gains in recent local elections, and has now established itself as a force to be reckoned with in the run-up to the 2017 presidential contest.
On Tuesday, hundreds of taxi drivers blocked the road at Paris’s Porte Maillot, one of the capital’s principal entry points. By 8.30am, they had already succeeded in blocking one direction of the eight-lane highway. Television images showed the strikers lighting fireworks and dragging metal barriers in front of commuter cars desperate to pass.
Waving flags and burning tyres, the taxi drivers were protesting about the rise of disruptive competition like Uber, the US ride-sharing application, and Heetch, a French ride-sharing app that has become popular among young people.
Taxi drivers complain that the competition has led to a 30 per cent reduction in their revenue in the last six months, and demand that the government take action to stem what they insist is unfair competition.
Among other things, they argue that minicab drivers working with services such as Uber do not have to pay the elevated prices for a regular licence — these have reached as high as €240,000 — and therefore compete under different conditions.
In June last year, police in riot gear used tear gas to break up a protest by taxi drivers, who had all but stopped transport to and from the capital’s airports.
People trying to reach Charles de Gaulle and Orly international airports were caught in the disturbance, causing many to miss their flights. Aéroports de Paris, the airports operator, warned passengers via its website to take public transport as the only means of reaching the terminals.
Singer Courtney Love was one of the many victims of the strike action. After her car was assailed by picketers. Ms Love took to Twitter to urge Mr Hollande, in coarse language, to get to the airport, asking: “Is it legal for your people to attack visitors?”

Tags: French taxi driver strikeMass strike
Categories: Labor News

Stop S.F. commuter shuttles until we know their effect

Current News - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 19:33

Stop S.F. commuter shuttles until we know their effect
http://www.sfchronicle.com/opinion/openforum/article/Stop-S-F-commuter-s...
By Susan Vaughan and Bob Planthold
January 22, 2016 Updated: January 23, 2016 3:09pm

<920x1240.jpg>Photo: Paul Chinn, The ChronicleProtesters, angered by the high number of Ellis Act evictions on tenants, block a Google bus at 18th and Dolores streets in San Francisco in April 2014. Some people fear the availability of the shuttles is driving up housing prices.
Mayor Ed Lee is rolling out another taxpayer giveaway, this time to Silicon Valley technology companies. Lee wants to permanently share an unlimited number of our public bus stops with an unlimited number of private shuttles that ferry employees for free from San Francisco to their jobs.

But on Tuesday, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors will hear an appeal of this plan to replace the 18-month pilot program with a permanent one. The pilot program ends Jan. 31.

The appeal is based on:

• the absence of an environmental impact report and the required mitigations that result from such reports.

• the illegality of the program.

COMMUTER BUSES

• Proposed plan would tighten rules on Google bus and shuttles

State law, with good reason, explicitly forbids any vehicle except public buses and cabs (and sometimes school buses), from operating at our public bus stops. The law outlaws big, fat private buses from blocking access for senior and disabled riders to public buses, outlaws slowing down Muni buses and trams, and preserves the ability of public transit — which is accessible to all — to expand as we take more and more steps to reduce congestion and greenhouse gas emissions.

Assemblyman Travis Allen, R-Huntington Beach, recently tried to amend that state law for the tech firms. An army of organizations, including San Francisco Democratic clubs, disability advocates, the Muni operators’ union TWU Local 250A, United Educators of San Francisco, Unite Here Local 2, and, at the state level, SEIU and AFSCME, sent Allen a message: Oh no you don’t. He pulled the bill. He introduced a new bill to the same end this month.

The 18-month pilot program analysis documents shuttle interference with travel and bicycle lanes 35 percent of the time, and a gallery of photos documents interference with Muni.

Just as alarming, evidence indicates that the availability of the shuttles — in November 2015 there were 479, equivalent to more than half of the Muni rubber-tire fleet — drives up housing prices, fueling the demographic turmoil hitting San Francisco and the Bay Area.

Now imagine an unlimited increase in private shuttles and public bus stops incorporated into the shuttle program.

Apple could employ as many as 27,900 additional employees at its two new campuses in Silicon Valley. Other Silicon Valley companies are also expanding. These companies offer as a perk to their employees living in San Francisco free transportation to and from their jobs. Meanwhile, the shuttle companies pay a revenue-neutral fee of $3.67 per stop per day to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. Tech companies get tax write-offs for providing free transportation to employees.

And yet, no environmental impact report has been done on this private transportation system with the potential for unlimited growth, unlimited interference with Muni, unlimited demographic disruption and unknown air quality impacts. (An air quality analysis done as part of an ending 18-month pilot program failed to evaluate projected air quality if the program expands, as expected.)

The tech companies could build workforce housing so as not to disrupt the rest of the Bay Area. But without an environmental impact report, they don’t have to do anything.

We purchase the tech companies’ products gleefully. Now let’s demand that they be better corporate citizens. Please write to the Board of Supervisors and demand they support the appeal: board.of.supervisors@sfgov.org.

Susan Vaughan is the chair of the Sierra Club San Francisco group. Bob Planthold is a disability advocate. They have filed the challenge to the permanent plan.

Tags: privatizationpublic services
Categories: Labor News

Stop S.F. commuter shuttles until we know their effect

Current News - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 19:33

Stop S.F. commuter shuttles until we know their effect
http://www.sfchronicle.com/opinion/openforum/article/Stop-S-F-commuter-s...
By Susan Vaughan and Bob Planthold
January 22, 2016 Updated: January 23, 2016 3:09pm

<920x1240.jpg>Photo: Paul Chinn, The ChronicleProtesters, angered by the high number of Ellis Act evictions on tenants, block a Google bus at 18th and Dolores streets in San Francisco in April 2014. Some people fear the availability of the shuttles is driving up housing prices.
Mayor Ed Lee is rolling out another taxpayer giveaway, this time to Silicon Valley technology companies. Lee wants to permanently share an unlimited number of our public bus stops with an unlimited number of private shuttles that ferry employees for free from San Francisco to their jobs.

But on Tuesday, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors will hear an appeal of this plan to replace the 18-month pilot program with a permanent one. The pilot program ends Jan. 31.

The appeal is based on:

• the absence of an environmental impact report and the required mitigations that result from such reports.

• the illegality of the program.

COMMUTER BUSES

• Proposed plan would tighten rules on Google bus and shuttles

State law, with good reason, explicitly forbids any vehicle except public buses and cabs (and sometimes school buses), from operating at our public bus stops. The law outlaws big, fat private buses from blocking access for senior and disabled riders to public buses, outlaws slowing down Muni buses and trams, and preserves the ability of public transit — which is accessible to all — to expand as we take more and more steps to reduce congestion and greenhouse gas emissions.

Assemblyman Travis Allen, R-Huntington Beach, recently tried to amend that state law for the tech firms. An army of organizations, including San Francisco Democratic clubs, disability advocates, the Muni operators’ union TWU Local 250A, United Educators of San Francisco, Unite Here Local 2, and, at the state level, SEIU and AFSCME, sent Allen a message: Oh no you don’t. He pulled the bill. He introduced a new bill to the same end this month.

The 18-month pilot program analysis documents shuttle interference with travel and bicycle lanes 35 percent of the time, and a gallery of photos documents interference with Muni.

Just as alarming, evidence indicates that the availability of the shuttles — in November 2015 there were 479, equivalent to more than half of the Muni rubber-tire fleet — drives up housing prices, fueling the demographic turmoil hitting San Francisco and the Bay Area.

Now imagine an unlimited increase in private shuttles and public bus stops incorporated into the shuttle program.

Apple could employ as many as 27,900 additional employees at its two new campuses in Silicon Valley. Other Silicon Valley companies are also expanding. These companies offer as a perk to their employees living in San Francisco free transportation to and from their jobs. Meanwhile, the shuttle companies pay a revenue-neutral fee of $3.67 per stop per day to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. Tech companies get tax write-offs for providing free transportation to employees.

And yet, no environmental impact report has been done on this private transportation system with the potential for unlimited growth, unlimited interference with Muni, unlimited demographic disruption and unknown air quality impacts. (An air quality analysis done as part of an ending 18-month pilot program failed to evaluate projected air quality if the program expands, as expected.)

The tech companies could build workforce housing so as not to disrupt the rest of the Bay Area. But without an environmental impact report, they don’t have to do anything.

We purchase the tech companies’ products gleefully. Now let’s demand that they be better corporate citizens. Please write to the Board of Supervisors and demand they support the appeal: board.of.supervisors@sfgov.org.

Susan Vaughan is the chair of the Sierra Club San Francisco group. Bob Planthold is a disability advocate. They have filed the challenge to the permanent plan.

Tags: privatizationpublic services
Categories: Labor News

France: 'Black Tuesday' as France grapples with taxi, aviation strikes

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Yahoo
Categories: Labor News

Port of Oakland sees upside in losing giant tenant-ILWU Jobs Threatened “The Ports America decision will have a real impact on many port workers, and those kind of good-paying jobs that support working families are hard to replace,” said Melvin Mackay, pr

Current News - Sat, 01/23/2016 - 14:07

Port of Oakland sees upside in losing giant tenant-ILWU Jobs Threatened “The Ports America decision will have a real impact on many port workers, and those kind of good-paying jobs that support working families are hard to replace,” said Melvin Mackay, president of International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local 10, which represents more than 1,000 dock workers.

http://www.sfchronicle.com/business/article/Port-of-Oakland-sees-upside-...
By Carolyn SaidJanuary 22, 2016 Updated:
January 23, 2016 11:18am

Photo: Michael Macor, The ChroniclePorts America, a major operator of shipping terminals at the Port of Oakland, has abruptly ended its contract.
To hear Port of Oakland officials tell it, losing terminals operator Ports America — a major tenant — is a blessing in disguise that will create a leaner, meaner seaport. But some maritime experts say the fallout could hurt the port, a vital economic engine that supports tens of thousands of jobs related to overseas cargo.

“We see this long term as a very positive thing,” said Chris Lytle, port executive director, in an annual State of the Port speech on Thursday. Lytle said the same amount of cargo should flow through Oakland despite Ports America abruptly ditching a 50-year lease for the Oakland Outer Harbor Terminal with 44 years to go. The port expected to receive $35.7 million from Ports America for fiscal year 2015-16 — a quarter of its maritime income.

“We are going to do absolutely everything in our power to make sure there are no disruptions to cargo in any way, shape or form,” Lytle said, saying the port had already found a home for 90 percent of the goods handled by Ports America, which plans to cease terminal operations by March 31. “We don’t want any vessel diversions.”

The port’s four other terminal operators have plenty of excess capacity to take up the slack, he said, and in fact need the additional work for their own profitability. Lytle said that loading and unloading work would expand to nights and weekends to handle the increase. He plans to ask port commissioners to fund transition costs, such as performance incentives to make sure the migrated cargo is handled swiftly.

Competitive edge

The port is eyeing new uses for the 210 acres Ports America is relinquishing that could make it more competitive, Lytle said. The seaport now exclusively focuses on container ships. It could attract revenue if it retooled to handle other cargo, such as automobiles or loose cargo such as steel girders.

One port commissioner floated the idea of the Oakland A’s or Raiders building a stadium at the terminal property. “This could be our own chance to have a ballpark on the waterfront,” said Commissioner Bryan Parker. Nearby Howard Terminal had been considered as a possible stadium site, but A’s owner Lew Wolff rejected it as too far from BART and too dogged by environmental issues.

But some experts are skeptical that the loss will create more efficiencies.

Photo: Michael Macor, The ChronicleTrucks bring their loads into a Ports America terminal at the outer harbor of the Port of Oakland.
“Customers fear that congestion will come back to the port,” said Kevin Bulger, chief operating officer of Apex Maritime Co. in Burlingame. The third-largest ocean freight forwarder for cargo from Asia to the United States, Apex moves significant volumes through the Port of Oakland.

While Bulger doesn’t expect significant delays like the industry experienced after last year’s labor dispute, any delays could be a problem. “If it gets too jammed, customers will divert cargo to other ports,” he said. “The overall volume of trade won’t be affected, but where it flows could be.”

For instance, agricultural exporters might pay to truck a perishable commodity like lettuce to the ports of Los Angeles or Long Beach if congestion returns to Oakland.

Longshore workers operate out of a hiring-hall system rather than being employees of terminal operators. Theoretically, if the same amount of cargo continues to flow through Oakland, their incomes would stay the same. But quietly, union officials worry that the port’s rosy projections may not be realistic — meaning Ports America’s move could result in less work.

‘A real impact’

“The Ports America decision will have a real impact on many port workers, and those kind of good-paying jobs that support working families are hard to replace,” said Melvin Mackay, president of International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local 10, which represents more than 1,000 dock workers.

Ports America, the nation’s largest terminal operator and stevedore, said it left Oakland to concentrate on operations in other ports, such as Los Angeles, Long Beach and Tacoma, Wash. Experts said that decision reflects shifts in the shipping industry that could erode Oakland’s business.

“We’re seeing consolidation take place in the industry,” said John McLaurin, president of the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association, a trade group for ocean carriers and terminal operators on the West Coast. “Times are difficult, rates are down. All West Coast ports face tremendous competition from other gateways.”

Still, McLaurin said, the outlook could be upbeat. “One door closes, another one opens,” he said. “This presents an opportunity for Oakland to see what they can do differently with the terminal.”

Ports America recently formed joint ventures with steamship lines, said Peter Hall, a professor at Vancouver’s Simon Fraser University who studies ports and logistics. He thinks its move may show that those carriers don’t want to be tied to the Bay Area port.

“This might signal that Oakland is becoming more a discretionary port that steamships visit when times are good, but that carriers’ long-term commitment is less firm,” he said.

Michael Nacht, a professor of public policy at the Goldman School at UC Berkeley and a former assistant secretary of defense for global strategic affairs, said Ports America’s move could rattle other port customers and tenants, even while Oakland continues to struggle with structural issues, including fewer rail connections than other ports, environmental concerns and recent labor strife.

“This is another sign of the narrowing market and lessening interest of others in using the port,” he said. “Oakland has to come up with innovative ways to compensate: better technology, new markets, more aggressive marketing.”

Complicating matters is that the Panama Canal is due to be dramatically expanded any day now, allowing much-larger ships to use it as a route from Asia to the East Coast — possibly skipping a call at Oakland altogether.

Panama Canal

Currently, the Panama Canal can handle ships carrying 5,000 shipping containers. After being widened, it will accommodate ones with up to 13,000 containers.

“If you have a ship (from Asia) that previously couldn’t get through the Panama Canal and so would have visited three or four ports on the West Coast, now it might just stop at one West Coast port and then go through the canal,” Hall said. “If you’re only going to stop at one California port, it ain’t Oakland. It will be L.A. or Long Beach. Even it’s it two, it won’t be Oakland, either.”

But Oakland has been working hard to stay competitive with the bigger rivals to the south, preparing for the new age of megaships.

Oakland spent millions to dredge berths and channels to accommodate bigger ships. The Benjamin Franklin, a quarter-mile-long and holding 18,000 shipping containers, docked in Oakland at year end — at the Ports America terminal.

Carolyn Said is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. E-mail: csaid@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @csaid

Tags: ILWU Local 10port of OaklandPorts America
Categories: Labor News

Boston Globe Workers Protest for Delivery of Labor Rights For Newspaper Delivery Workers

Current News - Sat, 01/23/2016 - 10:55

Boston Globe Workers Protest for Delivery of Labor Rights
http://www.beaconbroadside.com/broadside/2016/01/boston-globe-workers-pr...
By Aviva Chomsky

Boston Globe delivery workers protest
Click here to sign the petition demanding better working conditions for the Boston Globe delivery workers.

If you live anywhere near the Boston area, you’ve probably heard or read something about the Boston Globe’s recent delivery debacle. Since the newspaper contracted with a new delivery company starting December 28, the entire delivery system collapsed, and subscribers have been puzzled and furious that their daily newspaper has vanished with little explanation and little hope for restoration any time soon.

In my book Undocumented, I included a section on newspaper delivery. I criticized the way workers were classified as independent contractors, meaning that they could receive less than minimum wage and be excluded from workers’ compensation and unemployment benefits. I pointed out that they work 365 days a year, starting between one and four in the morning, could not miss a day of work unless they arranged for their own replacement, and had to drive hundreds of miles a week, paying for their own gas and car maintenance. Finally, I noticed that regardless of the severity of a snow emergency or whether the streets had even been plowed, workers were required to show up for their routes. “It’s a job,” I wrote, “made for an undocumented immigrant.” Indeed, in the Boston area and elsewhere in the United States, immigrants make up a large portion of the newspaper delivery labor force.

I never imagined that a few years later I would be sitting in a room with a half dozen newspaper delivery workers who were demanding a return to the conditions I had described—because the new Boston Globedelivery company, ACI Media Group of Long Beach California, had significantly worsened their working situation. In Lynn, Massachusetts, workers found significant labor and community support for their demands as members of the Lynn Worker Center, the North Shore Labor Council, the New Lynn Coalition, IUE-CWA Local 201, the Lynn City Council and the Lynn School Committee vowed to support their struggle.

old system, workers (classified as Independent Contractors) for PCF (Publishers Circulation Fulfillment) drove to a distribution center in Lynn where they folded and bagged the Globe, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and various supplements. From there they fanned out around the North Shore, following established delivery routes and distributing the correct paper or papers to each subscriber by seven in the morning. Until about five years ago, the company offered bonuses of $500 to workers who managed to finish the winter season with a minimum number of subscriber complaints. After a 2008 lawsuit, it implemented a system of accident insurance for workers who were injured on the job.

When ACI came in to take over the Globe delivery, the old intensive routes were broken up. The accident insurance disappeared. Now that workers have only one paper to deliver, the routes are significantly longer, which means more driving and more gas. Many workers lost their jobs, and those who were kept on by PCF are also faced with longer routes to deliver the same number of papers, because of the Globe’s decision. ACI also lowered the pay rate per paper delivered (which under PCF varied from sixteen to twenty cents for the daily paper and thirty to fifty for the Sunday paper, depending on the route, with extra for inserts) down to twelve cents per unit. Moreover, ACI consolidated the distribution system, so Lynn and other North Shore workers now have to drive to Woburn to collect their papers. At the old distribution center in Lynn, they folded and bagged their papers inside the facility, with plenty of light, tables, and access to bathrooms. In Woburn, they are forced to do it outdoors in the icy darkness, or awkwardly inside their cars.

Thousands of Globe subscribers are justifiably outraged that they have not had a paper delivered since December 28, that the paper’s customer service system has been as impossible to access as the paper itself, and that the management’s public response has been either celebratory or tepid. I have also been supremely frustrated with the Globe’s and other media coverage of the debacle. Reporters puzzled over the most basic questions, apparently unable to find or ask a worker. When Globe reporters and staff mobilized to deliver the paper themselves on the first Sunday after the crisis began, local and national media responded as if they were heroes for spending a few hours carrying out a task that poor and immigrant workers do invisibly, daily. Finally, many days into the story, a couple of news articles acknowledged what should have been the central story from the beginning: that this was a labor issue. If ACI literally can’t find workers willing to cover their routes, wouldn’t looking at working conditions be a logical place to start investigating a story?

For information regarding protests the workers are organizing and what you can do to support them, check back here, or call the Lynn Worker Center executive (857-277-4072) or the North Shore Labor Council (781-595-2538). You can click here to sign the petition demanding better working conditions for them.

Tags: Boston Globe Driversdelivery workers
Categories: Labor News

Japan MLIT (Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism) is largely to blame: Causes and background of the bus accident in Nagano

Current News - Fri, 01/22/2016 - 21:03

Japan MLIT (Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism) is largely to blame: Causes and background of the bus accident in Nagano
http://labornetjp.blogspot.com/2016/01/mlit-ministry-of-land-infrastruct...
Saturday, January 23, 2016
MLIT (Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism) is largely to blame: Causes and background of the bus accident in Nagano

The bus accident that occurred on the Usui Bypass, Nagano Prefecture killed twelve passengers, all university students, and two drivers. This is the most serious bus accident since the one that happened in January 1985 and claimed twenty five lives. The losses of many youths’ lives are tremendous to Japanese society. As the media have reported, both the travel agent, Keyth Tour, which planned the ski tour, and the bus operator, E.S.P., had organized and managed their tours in a very sloppy manner. Keyth Tour had already had negative reputations on the Internet even before the accident. Not only buses but also services of hotels arranged by the travel agent were criticized as being of poor quality – “no bath towel or toothbrush in a room”, “It’s a dormitory rather than a hotel”, and “It’s funny rather than frustrating”. The ski tour is typically cheap and nasty. (KUROGANE Ko, Safety Issues Research Group)

「大甘行政処分」国交省の責任は大きい~長野バス事故の原因とその背景

長野県・碓氷バイパスで起きたスキーツアーバス事故は、若者を中心に14人が死亡する惨事となった。自然災害などバス事業者の責任でない事故を除けば、1985年1月の犀川スキーバス事故(死者25人)以来の悲劇だ。未来ある若者の犠牲が日本社会に与えた損失は計り知れないほど大きい。ツアーを企画した旅行会社「キースツアー」と運行を請け負ったバス会社「イーエスピー」社のずさんな管理体制については、メディアで報道されているとおりだろう。キースツアーに関していえば、事故前から利用者のインターネット上での評価もさんざんだ。バス以外にも、同社が手配したホテルについて「部屋にバスタオルや歯ブラシすらない」「ホテルというより合宿所」「怒りを通り越し、もはやネタとしか思えない」などという手厳しい評価が並ぶ。「安かろう悪かろう」の典型例と言ってよい。(安全問題研究会・黒鉄好)

Tags: Japan bus drivers
Categories: Labor News

Turkey: Workers Killed and Arbitrary Detained by Turkish Security Forces

Labourstart.org News - Fri, 01/22/2016 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITUC
Categories: Labor News

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