Feed aggregator

Swazi union leader finally free

ITF - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 07:47
Basil Thwala, legal advisor to the Swaziland Transport & Allied Workers’ Union (STAWU), was released from prison this weekend.
Categories: Union Federations

China: Worker protests in China surge after Lunar New Year

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: China Labour Bulletin
Categories: Labor News

Swaziland: Police abduct trade unionists leading democracy fight

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Swazi Media Commentary
Categories: Labor News

Bulletin To Defend 4 Boston USW 8751 Bus Union Officers Fired By Veolia

Current News - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 11:41

Bulletin To Defend 4 Boston Bus Union Officers Fired By Veolia

Text of Union Bulletin to members:

Calling All Members / Witnesses To Testify About Veolia’s Violations and Union-Busting,
and In Support of the Union’s Case Against the Unjust Firing of Our 4 Union Officers

ALL OUT to the STEP 2
Termination Hearing!

Monday, April 14th

10:00 AM - on
(come immediately after the AM runs)

Veolia’s Main Office, behind the
Freeport yard
35 Freeport Way, Dorchester

Many hundreds of drivers, monitors and dispatchers signed a "Mass Affidavit" for the Union's legal team, headed by Attorney Al Gordon, bearing witness to the facts of Veolia's illegal actions - before, during and after the company's lockout on Oct. 8, 2013. Veolia - in its arrogant disregard for the truth and ongoing attempt to break our Union through numerous Unfair Labor Practices – refused to allow your testimony during ts “investigation” and is proceeding with its prosecution of the Local's 4 elected leaders. This Monday is another opportunity for you to put the truth on record and expose Veolia's lies.

Your eye-witness testimony will also assist Boston City Councilor Charles Yancey who, along with Councilors Tito Jackson and Ayanna Pressley, has filed another "HEARING ORDER REGARDING VEOLIA TRANSPORTATION'S LABOR PRACTICES IN THE CITY OF BOSTON", which will be scheduled soon.

Was there an "illegal wildcat strike" on Oct. 8, 2013, planned, instigated and organized by your 4 fired elected officers, as Veolia alleges? Of course not. Drivers’ eyewitness testimony at previous Step 2 hearings has exposed the truth that we all reported to work, and followed the Local Union leadership in demanding an immediate meeting about numerous grievances with top company and BPS officials, who were all present in the yards early that morning. In fact, evidence now shows that Veolia, in conspiracy with former Mayor Menino and BPS, shut down operations, instituting an illegal “Lock out”. Veolia refused to discuss a meeting with the Union, never ordered a single driver onto a bus - including city-wides and standbys - then called in police to force us off the property and locked the gates. Veolia/Menino/BPS orchestrated this union busting frame-up and “wild cat strike” hoax with the aim of breaking our union’s ability to fight to defend our members and the community against their vicious austerity, massive cutback attack on Equal, Quality Education, safe transportation and our jobs which we now face. We say “NO!”

Your testimony about what really happened will help put an end to Veolia's frame-up of our fired leaders and strengthen our campaign to make the company and BPS honor every hard-fought term and condition of our contract.

Tags: USW 8751school bus driversVeolia
Categories: Labor News

2014 May Events: From Marikana, South Africa To Oakland, CA: The Struggle For Workers Power

Current News - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 08:24

2014 May Events: From Marikana, South Africa To Oakland, CA: The Struggle For Workers Power

The fall of apartheid in South Africa in 1994 was a watershed victory. It culminated decades of struggle by the Black and Colored South African masses, a struggle supported by millions in the U.S. and around the world. The victory brought to power the Tripartite government of the African National Congress (ANC), the South African Communist Party (SACP), and the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU).

Now, two decades later, the ANC-led Tripartite government represents big business’s interests -- especially the interests of U.S. and European-based banks and corporations. This has led the government to brutally attack workers who fight back against austerity. Indeed, in 2012, at the Marikana mine, this government massacred 34 striking miners at the behest of the mine owners.

Black poverty has worsened. Inequality has worsened. Trade union officials collaborate with employers against workers, youth, and unemployed. Does this sound familiar? Isn’t the situation similar in the US, with union of- ficials not fighting employer and government attacks on workers, like the machinists at Boeing?

But in South Africa, there’s an exciting new development: for the first time since the fall of Apartheid, there’s a serious challenge to the Tripartite government’s rule, and it comes from the largest and most militant union in Africa. The National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (NUMSA) has broken with the COSATU leadership and called for South Africans not to support the ANC in this year’s elections. It is currently building a workers’ party and united front to lead the struggle against the capitalist onslaught of deregulation, privatization, and strike breaking.

We are privileged to present Brother Mphumzi Maqungo, the national treasurer of NUMSA and past chair of NUMSA’s autoworker shop steward network, to discuss these developments.

Thursday, May 1, 7:00 pm
ILWU Hall, Henry Schmidt Room
400 N. Point St./Mason, San Francisco
Streamed live on
www.ilmnetwork.org

Friday, May 2, 12 Noon at UC Berkeley,
McCone Hall (Room 575)

Saturday, May 3, 2 pm.
Black Repertory Theater; 3201 Adeline,
Berkeley (one block south of Ashby BART)

For updates or to get involved in building for these events, contact the May Day Committee in Solidarity with South African Workers at: twsc@transportworkers.org. Reach us directly at (510)325-8664 or (415)282-1908
www.transportworkers.org

Message for National Union Metalworkers of South Africa (2:38) by Mumia Abu-Jamal
http://www.prisonradio.org/media/audio/mumia/message-national-union-meta...
4/8/14
7PM ILWU Local 10, SF, May 1 2014
Mphumzi Maqungo, the Treasurer of the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (NUMSA), the largest union in that country, will be here in the Bay Area for May Day speeches. His Bay Area tour is being organized by the May Day Committee in Solidarity with South African Workers. Brother Maqungo will speak at ILWU Local 10 on May Day.
01:0202:38

Tags: NUMSAsolidaritySACPworkers powercapitalismworkers party
Categories: Labor News

2014 May Events: From Marikana, South Africa To Oakland, CA: The Struggle For Workers Power

Current News - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 08:24

2014 May Events: From Marikana, South Africa To Oakland, CA: The Struggle For Workers Power

The fall of apartheid in South Africa in 1994 was a watershed victory. It culminated decades of struggle by the Black and Colored South African masses, a struggle supported by millions in the U.S. and around the world. The victory brought to power the Tripartite government of the African National Congress (ANC), the South African Communist Party (SACP), and the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU).

Now, two decades later, the ANC-led Tripartite government represents big business’s interests -- especially the interests of U.S. and European-based banks and corporations. This has led the government to brutally attack workers who fight back against austerity. Indeed, in 2012, at the Marikana mine, this government massacred 34 striking miners at the behest of the mine owners.

Black poverty has worsened. Inequality has worsened. Trade union officials collaborate with employers against workers, youth, and unemployed. Does this sound familiar? Isn’t the situation similar in the US, with union of- ficials not fighting employer and government attacks on workers, like the machinists at Boeing?

But in South Africa, there’s an exciting new development: for the first time since the fall of Apartheid, there’s a serious challenge to the Tripartite government’s rule, and it comes from the largest and most militant union in Africa. The National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (NUMSA) has broken with the COSATU leadership and called for South Africans not to support the ANC in this year’s elections. It is currently building a workers’ party and united front to lead the struggle against the capitalist onslaught of deregulation, privatization, and strike breaking.

We are privileged to present Brother Mphumzi Maqungo, the national treasurer of NUMSA and past chair of NUMSA’s autoworker shop steward network, to discuss these developments.

Thursday, May 1, 7:00 pm
ILWU Hall, Henry Schmidt Room
400 N. Point St./Mason, San Francisco
Streamed live on
www.ilmnetwork.org

Friday, May 2, 12 Noon at UC Berkeley,
McCone Hall (Room 575)

Saturday, May 3, 2 pm.
Black Repertory Theater; 3201 Adeline,
Berkeley (one block south of Ashby BART)

For updates or to get involved in building for these events, contact the May Day Committee in Solidarity with South African Workers at: twsc@transportworkers.org. Reach us directly at (510)325-8664 or (415)282-1908
www.transportworkers.org

Message for National Union Metalworkers of South Africa (2:38) by Mumia Abu-Jamal
http://www.prisonradio.org/media/audio/mumia/message-national-union-meta...
4/8/14
7PM ILWU Local 10, SF, May 1 2014
Mphumzi Maqungo, the Treasurer of the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (NUMSA), the largest union in that country, will be here in the Bay Area for May Day speeches. His Bay Area tour is being organized by the May Day Committee in Solidarity with South African Workers. Brother Maqungo will speak at ILWU Local 10 on May Day.
01:0202:38

Tags: NUMSAsolidaritySACPworkers powercapitalismworkers party
Categories: Labor News

From Marikana, South African To Oakland, CA: The Struggle For Workers Power

Current News - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 07:56

From Marikana, South African To Oakland, CA: The Struggle For Workers Power

The fall of apartheid in South Africa in 1994 was a watershed victory. It culminated decades of struggle by the Black and Colored South African masses, a struggle supported by millions in the U.S. and around the world. The victory brought to power the Tripartite government of the African National Congress (ANC), the South African Communist Party (SACP), and the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU).

Now, two decades later, the ANC-led Tripartite government represents big business’s interests -- especially the interests of U.S. and European-based banks and corporations. This has led the government to brutally attack workers who fight back against austerity. Indeed, in 2012, at the Marikana mine, this government massacred 34 striking miners at the behest of the mine owners.

Black poverty has worsened. Inequality has worsened. Trade union officials collaborate with employers against workers, youth, and unemployed. Does this sound familiar? Isn’t the situation similar in the US, with union of- ficials not fighting employer and government attacks on workers, like the machinists at Boeing?

But in South Africa, there’s an exciting new development: for the first time since the fall of Apartheid, there’s a serious challenge to the Tripartite government’s rule, and it comes from the largest and most militant union in Africa. The National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa (NUMSA) has broken with the COSATU leadership and called for South Africans not to support the ANC in this year’s elections. It is currently building a workers’ party and united front to lead the struggle against the capitalist onslaught of deregulation, privatization, and strike breaking.

We are privileged to present Brother Mphumzi Maqungo, the national treasurer of NUMSA and past chair of NUMSA’s autoworker shop steward network, to discuss these developments.

Thursday, May 1, 7:00 pm
ILWU Hall, Henry Schmidt Room
400 N. Point St./Mason, San Francisco

Friday, May 2, 12 Noon at UC Berkeley,
McCone Hall (Room 575)

Saturday, May 3, 2 pm.
Black Repertory Theater; 3201 Adeline,
Berkeley (one block south of Ashby BART)

For updates or to get involved in building for these events, contact the May Day Committee in Solidarity with South African Workers at: twsc@transportworkers.org. Reach us directly at (510)325-8664 or (415)282-1908
www.transportworkers.org

Tags: Marikanaworkers powersolidarity SACP
Categories: Labor News

ATU Pres Larry Hanley On The Attack On Public Transit, Transit Workers And The ATU

Current News - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 09:40

Amalgamated Transit Union ATU Pres Larry Hanley On The Attack On Public Transit, Transit Workers And The ATU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNLH6-4QAcA&feature=
Larry Hanley, president of the Amalgamated Transit Union ATU spoke in
Chicago on April 6, 2014 at the Labor Notes conference on the attack
on public transit, transit workers and public services.
Production of Labor Video Project www.laborvideo.org

Tags: atuprivatizationtransit workers
Categories: Labor News

4/24 Postal Workers Staples National Day Of Action Against Privatization- Bay Area Protests April 24, 2014

Current News - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 09:28

Postal Workers Staples National Day Of Action Against Privatization- Bay Area Protests April 24, 2014
http://sflaborcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/04-24-14APWUDay-of-...
www.stopstaples.com

Postal Workers Staples National Day Of Action Against Privatization- Bay Area Protests April 24, 2014-Corrupt Blum-Feinstein Connection
http://sflaborcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/04-24-14APWUDay-of-...
www.stopstaples.com

BAY AREA EVENTS:

SAN FRANCISCO
Time: 10:00 AM
Address: 1700 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94109
SAN LEANDRO
Time: 1:00 PM
Address: 15555 East 14th Street #200, San Leandro, CA 94578
CAMPBELL
Time: 3:30 PM
Address: 500 East Hamilton Avenue, Campbell, CA 95008

APWU Pres Mark Dimondstein Calls For Defense Of The People's Post Office
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_06Asbv49fU&feature=
On April 4, 2014, Mark Dimondstein president of the American Postal Workers Union spoke in Chicago at the Labor Notes convention on how to defend the People's Post Office. He also discussed the union's new effort to establish a public postal bank system for millions of poor and working people who do not have access to the commercial banks.
For more information on APWU go to www.apwu.org
Production of Labor Video Project www.laborvideo.org

Staples’ selling postal products without USPS workers stirs fears of privatization
http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/federal_government/staples-sellin...
The Federal Diary
Joe Davidson
Staples’ selling postal products without USPS workers stirs fears of privatization

By Joe Davidson, Thursday, January 16, 5:59 PM E-mail the writers
With its steep financial challenges, the U.S. Postal Service desperately needs to find innovative solutions, including new ways to deliver services to the public.

A pilot project with Staples stores around the nation does that.

But feeling ignored in this equation are postal workers left watching as their jobs go to private employers who can pay their employees less, even as postal employment plummets.

The largest postal employee union and a U.S. senator say the pilot also is a step toward privatization of the USPS, an assertion the postmaster general vehemently denies.

Here’s the story:

The Staples pilot project, called the Retail Partner Expansion Program, began in October. Eighty-two stores nationwide, though none in the D.C. area, have sections resembling mini-post offices. They sell a variety of products and services, including stamps, Priority Mail, Priority Mail Express and package handling. Staples doesn’t offer registered mail, money orders, stamped envelopes or post office boxes.

“Our goal,” Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said in an interview, “is to provide universal access to products and services, and if we can do that through agreements with companies like Staples . . . we need to do that. . . . It gives us an opportunity to grow the business.”

That’s cool, as far as the American Postal Workers Union is concerned, but why not have postal employees work those counters in Staples? “I can’t dictate to Staples what their hiring policies should be,” said Donahoe, who is chief executive of the Postal Service.

But can’t USPS say it wants a postal employee to sell postal products at a postal counter in Staples? “It would never be my intention to do that,” he said. “That’s their business. . . .That’s their call.”

It’s the wrong call, APWU President Mark Dimondstein said.

“This is a direct assault on our jobs and on public postal services,” he said in a statement. “The APWU supports the expansion of postal services. But we are adamantly opposed to USPS plans to replace good-paying union jobs with non-union low-wage jobs held by workers who have no accountability for the safety and security of the mail.”

Carrie McElwee, a Staples spokeswoman, would not discuss the pay or union status of the company’s workforce.

Dimondstein also fears that the Staples experiment foreshadows a privatization of the U.S. Postal Service. He is concerned about maintaining “the infrastructure of the Postal Service that belongs to the people of this country.”

The APWU is willing to go along with the Staples project if it uses postal employees, “but we also have to be very careful that the private companies don’t become the Postal Service, because those private companies can be here today and [not] be here tomorrow,” Dimondstein said by phone. “We don’t want private companies making decisions about what’s best for the public good and the public service when their bottom line is simply profit.”

Donahoe said the Staples project is good for the public and for postal employees, too.

“My goal is to grow the business,” he said. “If we grow the business, that benefits 490,000 career employees and another 100,000-plus non-career. It’s good for everybody.”

The number of postal workers has fallen by about 44 percent since 2000, Donahoe said. TheBureau of Labor Statistics has projected these declines in the postal workforce between 2012 and 2022: postal mail sorters, processors and processing-machine operators, 30 percent; mail carriers, 27 percent; and mail superintendents, 24 percent. Postal finances are improving, but the Postal Service lost $5 billion in fiscal 2013.

Donahoe said privatization “would be a crazy idea. I think the Postal Service as structured is a great service provider. . . . Why would we ever put anything like that at risk?”

Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.), chairman of the federal workforce subcommittee, doesn’t think USPS provides great service, and he also warns against privatization. Tester said he doesn’t object to postal products being sold in stores, but he was critical of Donahoe for seeking to shut postal facilities, which Tester said would delay deliveries.

Delivery standards are a personal issue with Tester, an issue he wants addressed in postal reform legislation that has bounced around Capitol Hill for years.

“I’ve been late for house payments” because of poor delivery resulting from the closing of processing centers, he said in an office interview. He said his wife mails payments a week earlier than previously.

“What I see this postmaster general doing is shutting down post offices, then saying let Staples do it,” Tester said. “Well, guess what: I don’t have a Staples.” Tester farms wheat outside Big Sandy, Mont., which has 600 residents.

Donahoe “can say whatever he wants,” Tester said, “but I think he wants to privatize. And I think there’s plenty of people in Congress who agree with that. I don’t.”

Previous columns by Joe Davidson are available at wapo.st/JoeDavidson.

Corrupt Blum-Feinstein Privatization Scheme To Profit In Sell Off Of US Post Offices
http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/inspector-general-criticizes-usps...
Inspector general criticizes USPS relationship with real estate representative CBRE

By Lisa Rein, Published: February 20 E-mail the writer
The U.S. Postal Service is putting itself at financial risk by allowing an outside real estate firm to negotiate sales and leases of postal property on behalf of the mail agency and prospective buyers and renters at the same time, a watchdog warned this week.

The practice, called “dual agency representation,” has the potential to create conflicts of interest for CBRE, with the result that the real estate company might not maximize revenue for the financially ailing Postal Service.

“CBRE conflicts of interest could lead to financial loss to the Postal Service and decrease public trust in the Postal Service’s brand,” USPS Inspector General David C. Williams said Wednesday in a “management alert” that strongly recommends that the arrangement be scrapped.

The Postal Service and the firm have been targeted by critics for the selling off of historic post office buildings, at what preservationists say have been relatively low prices and without adequate public notice or effort to adhere to federal preservation guidelines.

The chairman of CBRE’s board of directors is Richard C. Blum, who is married to Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), a fact that has heightened scrutiny of the relationship between the Postal Service and the real estate firm. Wednesday’s report did not address the historic buildings or Blum.

In the report, the inspector general urged postal officials to switch to arm’s length transactions, in which CBRE would represent only the agency. The change, the report said, would ensure that contract terms do not give too much financial control to buyers or to sellers.

“We do not believe allowing the arrangement is in the Postal Service’s best interest,” Michael A. Magalski, deputy assistant inspector general for support operations, wrote to postal officials.

“When representing the Postal Service, it is important for CBRE to be focused on maximizing revenue when negotiating sales and leases of Postal Service properties and reducing costs when negotiating leases of properties for the Postal Service to occupy,” Magalski wrote. “This focus is compromised when it is also representing the interests of the buyer, lessee, or lessor.”

Postal officials told Magalski that they do not plan to stop the practice of dual representation, arguing that it gives them wider exposure to potential buyers or renters and ensures healthy competition. Such arrangements also are allowed under CBRE’s contract with the General Services Administration, postal officials said.

“The Postal Service appreciates the time and effort that the [Office of Inspector General] invested in preparing the Management Alert, however, it does not agree with the OIG in this instance,” Sue Brennan, a Postal Service spokeswoman, said in a statement. Postal officials believe that “following their recommendation is not in the best interests of the Postal Service.”

She said the agency “has put in place reporting and consent requirements to minimize any risks associated with conflict of interest.”

But the inspector general said “no consensus exists as to the benefits associated with a dual agency arrangement.”

In a statement, CBRE said the company “undertakes to maximize the value of each asset disposition” for the Postal Service, whose properties have “consistently” been sold at or above the appraised value provided by a third party.

“All properties are sold on an arm’s length basis after broad exposure to the market,” the company said.

Wednesday’s report is the latest in a string of controversies involving the Postal Service’s contract with CBRE, a $7 billion Fortune 500 company the agency made its exclusive real estate agent in 2011. The Postal Service leases about 24,000 post offices and other properties and owns about 9,000 more.

The company said that Blum, as its “non-executive” chairman, plays no role in day-to-day operations and was unaware of the contract with the Postal Service when it was awarded. His investment firm owns 41 / 2 percent of CBRE’s outstanding shares.

Feinstein’s office has said the senator does not discuss her husband’s business decisions with him — and that Congress has no role in choosing which companies do business with the Postal Service.

Williams is also conducting a detailed audit of postal real estate transactions handled by CBRE, “given the multiple roles CBRE plays for the Postal Service and within the real estate industry,” the report said.

Opponents of the sales of historic post office buildings got nonbinding language in the recent federal budget that supports blocking further sales until the Office of Inspector General completes its probe of the agency’s process for transferring ownership of its buildings.

The contract with CBRE requires the firm to notify postal officials of any actual or potential conflicts of interest within five days of a request for or ordering of contract work.

The company has submitted 10 “dual agency” disclosure letters detailing transactions in which it represented both the Postal Service and potential buyers or renters, the inspector general said. It represented both parties in three of those transactions before the contract with the Postal Service was changed in June 2012 to allow for dual representation.

Tags: APWUStaplesprivatization
Categories: Labor News

Argentina Buenos Aires Subway Worker Joaquin Garcia Castellanos On Transit Worker Issues

Current News - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 23:38

Argentina Buenos Aires Subway Worker Joaquin Garcia Castellanos On Transit Worker Issues
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VoGET-Aw0A0&feature=
Buenos Aries Subway worker and unionist Joaquin Garcia Castellanos
talks about the the fight for the 6 hour day and the struggles of
Argentinian transit workers. He is the secretary for international
relations of the Asociación gremial de trabajadores del Subterráneo y
Premetro (AGTSyP). The interview was done on April 6 2014 in Chicago
during the Labor Notes Convention.
They can be contacted at www.metrodelegados.com.ar
Production of the Labor Video Project www.laborvideo.org

Tags: Asociación gremial de trabajadores del Subterráneo y Premetro (AGTSyP)
Categories: Labor News

BART hires union busting consultant to potentially avert strikes "interest based bargaining"

Current News - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 19:42

BART hires union busting consultant to potentially avert strikes "interest based bargaining"
http://www.timesunion.com/news/article/BART-hires-consultant-to-potentia...
Published 1:46 pm, Friday, April 11, 2014

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The Bay Area Rapid Transit agency has hired a labor consultant to help figure out how to prevent problems that led to two strikes and a contentious contract dispute.
The BART board of directors voted on Thursday to hire Rhonda Hilyer of the Seattle-based Agreement Dynamics Inc. to re-examine how the agency negotiates contracts and the checks and balances used to prevent errors.
Hilyer will work with a BART board ad hoc committee that will recommend strategies to improve labor negotiations. The consultant will be paid $225,000.
BART's two largest unions staged two-four day strikes last year. The parties reached a tentative agreement in October before BART objected to a provision about an expensive family medical leave benefit they say had been mistakenly put into the deal.
A final deal was reached in December and ratified in January.

Categories: Labor News

Swaziland: Increased attacks against workers in Swaziland

Labourstart.org News - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITUC
Categories: Labor News

Big Brown Waves White Flag

Current News - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 14:12

Big Brown Waves White Flag
http://labornotes.org/2014/04/big-brown-waves-white-flag-0

April 10, 2014 / Jane Slaughter
611 34

When the fired UPS drivers retraced their routes, they found customers ready to pose in supportive photos and talk onvideo about what their driver meant to them. UPS "underestimated once again how popular our drivers are with their customers," said Teamsters Local 804 President Tim Sylvester. Photo: Local 804.

In the wake of a relentless grassroots labor-community solidarity campaign, UPS waved the white flag and agreed to rehire all 250 New York City drivers the company fired last month. The campaign united drivers, elected officials, and even UPS customers.

UPS issued termination notices to 250 drivers in March for a 90-minute work stoppage they had carried out on February 26.

Jairo Reyes, a 24-year driver, had been fired for starting work too early, and was walked off the job. This violated the Teamsters’ contract, which called for a 72-hour waiting period and a hearing before a worker could be walked off.

Drivers gathered in the parking lot to show their displeasure. “Our contract had been violated so many times,” Reyes told Labor Notes. “This was the straw that broke the camel’s back.”

Reyes will also return to work, under the terms of the agreement struck between UPS and Teamsters Local 804 yesterday.

UPS had previously vowed never to back down. The company refused to negotiate with Local 804 and told the press it would boot all 250 drivers as soon as replacements were trained.

At first management seemed to make good on that threat. The first 20 workers were fired on March 31, at the end of their last work day of the month so that they and their families would lose their April health care coverage.

Four days later, UPS fired 16 more drivers as their local president prepared to take the stage to speak at the Labor Notes Conference.

But just five days after that, UPS executives from company headquarters in Atlanta were at the table and striking an agreement with the union to return all 250 drivers to work.

What Made Brown Back Down?

Immediately after the walkout, Local 804 leaders met with the company to try to settle the dispute. Managers shut down the talks after minutes and said they were issuing termination notices to all 250 drivers.

So Local 804 launched a grassroots campaign to mobilize public support. First, the union mobilized its own ranks. Stewards and union activists passed out bulletins and petitions to show Teamster solidarity.

But the outreach quickly spread to the public in the form of an online petition launched by the Working Families Party (WFP), a grassroots political party of affiliated unions and community groups, including Teamsters Joint Council 16 in New York.

Local 804 members rallied on March 21 in front of the UPS hub in Maspeth, Queens, and delivered more than 105,000 petition signatures to the company. New York City Public Advocate Letitia James and city council members joined the rally. So did Assembly member Michael Simanowitz.

No labor radical, Simanowitz is a moderate Democrat who represents an Orthodox Jewish section of Queens. But he is also a UPS customer. His UPS driver, Domenick “Dedom” Dedomenico, was one of the 250 fired Teamsters—one with a special back story.

Dedom was run over while delivering Christmas packages for UPS. He spent 10 days in a coma and another 13 months recovering from a traumatic brain injury.

When Dedom returned to UPS, he was met with a barrage of warning letters and suspensions for “failing to meet his previous demonstrated performance.”

A supervisor assigned to monitor Dedom for a day reported that customers were slowing him down to welcome him back on the job, and breaking into tears.

Management responded by suspending Dedom and telling him to pick up the pace. Brown’s ultimatum? Deliver one more package per hour or lose your job. Then Dedom became one of the 250 who were issued termination notices.

“He spent a week in a coma, and how does this company repay him when he comes back to work? They fire him because he stood up for his brothers,” said Simanowitz. “This is not over. Dedom is not fired. If he is then I’ll personally lay down in front of that driveway.”

Letitia James grabbed the microphone from Simanowitz and told the rallying Teamsters that UPS had a $43 million contract up for renewal with New York State and, “if UPS does not do right by the workers in this city, then the city will not do right by UPS.”

A hot campaign got a lot hotter. Elected officials began scrutinizing UPS’s financial dealings with the city and state, including a sweetheart deal through the Department of Finance’s stipulated-fine program that cuts UPS’s parking tickets by $15 to $20 million a year.

UPS responded by firing 20 drivers, chosen at random.

Local 804 kicked its campaign up a notch. The union reached out to the press, and the firing of the 250 workers and Dedom, the driver who survived a coma only to be canned by UPS, became tabloid fodder.

Local 804 also reached out to other unions while the Working Families Party galvanized support from elected officials.

On April 3, fired drivers and other Local 804 Teamsters held a press conference on the steps of City Hall with other Teamsters, nurses, bus and train operators from Transport Workers Local 100, members of the Communications Workers and Service Employees 32-BJ, Laborers, and others.

Drivers told their story flanked by more than a dozen elected officials, including Letitia James and City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

"I do not understand who at that company put forward a business plan to take away a generation of good will between UPS and the City of New York," Stringer said. “But this is not gonna end this way.”

UPS axed 16 more drivers the following day.

Who Speaks for UPS Customers?

With political pressure and bad PR on the rise, UPS tried to justify the firings as the only responsible business decision.

“We simply cannot allow employee misconduct that jeopardizes our ability to reliably serve our customers,” UPS told the press.

One executive told the Daily News that UPS was firing 250 drivers because “we believe we owe it to our customers.”

The union decided to put the question directly to those customers.

Fired drivers launched a customer outreach campaign. They retraced their routes, passed out leaflets, and talked with customers. Customers posed for photos with the fired drivers with signs that said, "What Can Brown Do for Me? Not This" and "Rehire This Guy."

Steve Curcio was one of the original 20 firees who reached out to customers on his mixed commercial and residential route. “We were going out to customers on the route and asking their honest opinions and reactions to why we were missing,” he said. “Everyone misses their guy, this guy is here every single day. They don't want their business being disrupted.”

Supporters nationwide flooded the corporation with phone calls and bombed the UPS Facebook page.

Customer Lois Toscano from Little Neck called the Local 804 hall to see what she could do. She said her UPS driver—whose name she didn’t know—had once saved her family’s life. As she and her three children drowsily watched TV, Armin Kaeser rang the bell and said, “Mrs. Toscano, I smell gas.”

“At Christmas,” Toscano told the Daily News, “when presents are being delivered, [Kaeser] rings the doorbell first to make sure the kids aren’t around before he hauls everything up to the door.”

Local 804 made a video of customers speaking their minds to UPS. The testimonials were unscripted and heartfelt and shredded the company’s argument that UPS owed the firings to its customers.

“What can Brown do for me? They can give me my driver back,” said Alex Silaco of Tiles Unlimited.

“I know what you mean to my company,” another customer said, “It would be a shame if UPS makes the mistake of letting the drivers go that are important for their customer base.”

Local 804 President Tim Sylvester said the tipping point for the campaign was “customers’ involvement. Management underestimated once again how popular our drivers are with their customers, just like in 1997 [when Teamsters struck for two weeks for full-time jobs].”

Teamsters Secretary-Treasurer Ken Hall, the union’s chief negotiator with UPS, had not issued a single public comment or statement of support since February 26—a fact not lost on Local 804 members or union activists at UPS nationwide.

But the day before negotiations with UPS, Hall flew to New York and visited with drivers in Maspeth to offer support to the 250 drivers.

The next day, Local 804 leaders, international union officials, and UPS executives met and hammered out the agreement.

All 250 terminations were reduced to 10-day suspensions. Local 804 will also issue a statement to members outlining the proper union procedures for a walkout.

A Teakettle on a Flame

“The buildup of frustration causes people to do things they wouldn't normally do,” Sylvester said. “You can only put a teakettle on a flame for so long before the lid comes off.”

New York drivers were fed up with long hours, increasing production standards, and constant technological surveillance, Sylvester said. Every UPS truck is equipped with more than 200 sensors that monitor drivers' every move, and drivers are expected to follow 72 pages of “methods,” such as hold the keys in your right hand as you approach your vehicle, start the truck and buckle your seat belt in one motion.

Labor Notes asked Curcio if he was surprised his union would do so much. “I expected at least what they did,” he said. “Something of this magnitude, so severe, that touched so many people—something had to be done.”

- See more at: http://labornotes.org/2014/04/big-brown-waves-white-flag-0#sthash.G2734v...

Tags: IBT 804upsretaliatory firings
Categories: Labor News

Hong Kong Dockers Strike & Struggles: Report By Stephan Chan and Wong Yu Loy

Current News - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 08:21

Hong Kong Dockers Strike & Struggles: Report By Stephan Chan and Wong Yu Loy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fck2nERAXc
Hong Kong dockers are on the move after a 40 day strike in 2013.
This is a presentation by Hong Kong trade unionists Stephan
Chan and Wong Yu Loy on how their union was formed and
the lessons of their strike against Li Ka-shing' s Hutchison Port
Holdings Trust. He is the richest man in Hong Kong and owns
over 50 docks in China and around the world.
This presentation was made in San Francisco on April 8, 2014.
For more information on the Hong Kong dockers go to:
www.hkctu.org.hk
Production of Labor Video Project www.laborvideo.org

Tags: Hong Kong Dockerssolididarity
Categories: Labor News

Big win for Chilean cabin crew

ITF - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 08:04
Cabin crew at Chilean aviation company LAN Express won the right to significantly improved working conditions this week.
Categories: Union Federations

URGENT PHONE/E-MAIL BLAST! Help the Citizens Co-op Workers Union!

IWW - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 08:02

At this time the Citizens Co-op Workers Union is asking all supportive Co-op Members and Concerned Community Members to call and email management to express your feelings, comments and questions about the unfair labor practices and termination of 5 union workers. We want your voices heard and for you to hear the explanations for their actions!

read more

Categories: Unions

Drivers Win $2.2 Million in Calif. Contractor Status Case

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 07:12
Rip WatsonTransport TopicsApril 11, 2014View the original piece

A California state agency has ruled that seven drivers for Pacer International Inc. who challenged their status as independent contractors can collect $2.21 million.

The Department of Labor Standards Enforcement ruled the drivers were company employees, rather than independent contractors. Pacer, which recently became part of XPO Logistics, has filed a notice of appeal.

The case is the latest development in an ongoing battle over the status of truck drivers, who are independent contractors from the carriers’ standpoint.

Don Minchey, the hearing officer in the case, wrote “the plaintiffs are convincing in their arguments.”

Drivers’ independent contractor status is being challenged by union organizers, in Southern California and other locations, who are seeking employee status so that organizing campaigns can advance.

“We are aware of the rulings by the administrative hearing officer in the seven claims,” an XPO spokesman told Transport Topics. “These cases are ongoing and we have appealed the rulings to California Superior Court. We intend to vigorously oppose these claims, which we believe are without merit.”

Issues: Freight
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Big Brown Waves White Flag

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 07:09
Jane SlaughterLabor NotesApril 11, 2014View the original piece

In the wake of a relentless grassroots labor-community solidarity campaign, UPS waved the white flag and agreed to rehire all 250 New York City drivers the company fired last month. The campaign united drivers, elected officials, and even UPS customers.

UPS issued termination notices to 250 drivers in March for a 90-minute work stoppage they had carried out on February 26.

Jairo Reyes, a 24-year driver, had been fired for starting work too early, and was walked off the job. This violated the Teamsters’ contract, which called for a 72-hour waiting period and a hearing before a worker could be walked off.

Drivers gathered in the parking lot to show their displeasure. “Our contract had been violated so many times,” Reyes told Labor Notes. “This was the straw that broke the camel’s back.”

Reyes will also return to work, under the terms of the agreement struck between UPS andTeamsters Local 804 yesterday.

UPS had previously vowed never to back down. The company refused to negotiate with Local 804 and told the press it would boot all 250 drivers as soon as replacements were trained.

At first management seemed to make good on that threat. The first 20 workers were fired on March 31, at the end of their last work day of the month so that they and their families would lose their April health care coverage.

Four days later, UPS fired 16 more drivers as their local president prepared to take the stage to speak at the Labor Notes Conference.

But just five days after that, UPS executives from company headquarters in Atlanta were at the table and striking an agreement with the union to return all 250 drivers to work.

What Made Brown Back Down?

Immediately after the walkout, Local 804 leaders met with the company to try to settle the dispute. Managers shut down the talks after minutes and said they were issuing termination notices to all 250 drivers.

So Local 804 launched a grassroots campaign to mobilize public support. First, the union mobilized its own ranks. Stewards and union activists passed out bulletins and petitions to show Teamster solidarity.

But the outreach quickly spread to the public in the form of an online petition launched by the Working Families Party (WFP), a grassroots political party of affiliated unions and community groups, including Teamsters Joint Council 16 in New York.

Local 804 members rallied on March 21 in front of the UPS hub in Maspeth, Queens, and delivered more than 105,000 petition signatures to the company. New York City Public Advocate Letitia James and city council members joined the rally. So did Assembly member Michael Simanowitz.

No labor radical, Simanowitz is a moderate Democrat who represents an Orthodox Jewish section of Queens. But he is also a UPS customer. His UPS driver, Domenick “Dedom” Dedomenico, was one of the 250 fired Teamsters—one with a special back story.

Dedom was run over while delivering Christmas packages for UPS. He spent 10 days in a coma and another 13 months recovering from a traumatic brain injury.

When Dedom returned to UPS, he was met with a barrage of warning letters and suspensions for “failing to meet his previous demonstrated performance.”

A supervisor assigned to monitor Dedom for a day reported that customers were slowing him down to welcome him back on the job, and breaking into tears.

Management responded by suspending Dedom and telling him to pick up the pace. Brown’s ultimatum? Deliver one more package per hour or lose your job. Then Dedom became one of the 250 who were issued termination notices.

“He spent a week in a coma, and how does this company repay him when he comes back to work? They fire him because he stood up for his brothers,” said Simanowitz. “This is not over. Dedom is not fired. If he is then I’ll personally lay down in front of that driveway.”

Letitia James grabbed the microphone from Simanowitz and told the rallying Teamsters that UPS had a $43 million contract up for renewal with New York State and, “if UPS does not do right by the workers in this city, then the city will not do right by UPS.”

A hot campaign got a lot hotter. Elected officials began scrutinizing UPS’s financial dealings with the city and state, including a sweetheart deal through the Department of Finance’s stipulated-fine program that cuts UPS’s parking tickets by $15 to $20 million a year.

UPS responded by firing 20 drivers, chosen at random.

Local 804 kicked its campaign up a notch. The union reached out to the press, and the firing of the 250 workers and Dedom, the driver who survived a coma only to be canned by UPS, became tabloid fodder.

Local 804 also reached out to other unions while the Working Families Party galvanized support from elected officials.

On April 3, fired drivers and other Local 804 Teamsters held a press conference on the steps of City Hall with other Teamsters, nurses, bus and train operators from Transport Workers Local 100, members of the Communications Workers and Service Employees 32-BJ, Laborers, and others.

Drivers told their story flanked by more than a dozen elected officials, including Letitia James and City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

"I do not understand who at that company put forward a business plan to take away a generation of good will between UPS and the City of New York," Stringer said. “But this is not gonna end this way.”

UPS axed 16 more drivers the following day.

Who Speaks for UPS Customers?

With political pressure and bad PR on the rise, UPS tried to justify the firings as the only responsible business decision.

“We simply cannot allow employee misconduct that jeopardizes our ability to reliably serve our customers,” UPS told the press.

One executive told the Daily News that UPS was firing 250 drivers because “we believe we owe it to our customers.”

The union decided to put the question directly to those customers.

Fired drivers launched a customer outreach campaign. They retraced their routes, passed out leaflets, and talked with customers. Customers posed for photos with the fired drivers with signs that said, "What Can Brown Do for Me? Not This" and "Rehire This Guy."

Steve Curcio was one of the original 20 firees who reached out to customers on his mixed commercial and residential route. “We were going out to customers on the route and asking their honest opinions and reactions to why we were missing,” he said. “Everyone misses their guy, this guy is here every single day. They don't want their business being disrupted.”

Supporters nationwide flooded the corporation with phone calls and bombed the UPS Facebook page.

Customer Lois Toscano from Little Neck called the Local 804 hall to see what she could do. She said her UPS driver—whose name she didn’t know—had once saved her family’s life. As she and her three children drowsily watched TV, Armin Kaeser rang the bell and said, “Mrs. Toscano, I smell gas.”

“At Christmas,” Toscano told the Daily News, “when presents are being delivered, [Kaeser] rings the doorbell first to make sure the kids aren’t around before he hauls everything up to the door.”

Local 804 made a video of customers speaking their minds to UPS. The testimonials were unscripted and heartfelt and shredded the company’s argument that UPS owed the firings to its customers.

“What can Brown do for me? They can give me my driver back,” said Alex Silaco of Tiles Unlimited.

“I know what you mean to my company,” another customer said, “It would be a shame if UPS makes the mistake of letting the drivers go that are important for their customer base.”

Local 804 President Tim Sylvester said the tipping point for the campaign was “customers’ involvement. Management underestimated once again how popular our drivers are with their customers, just like in 1997 [when Teamsters struck for two weeks for full-time jobs].”

Teamsters Secretary-Treasurer Ken Hall, the union’s chief negotiator with UPS, had not issued a single public comment or statement of support since February 26—a fact not lost on Local 804 members or union activists at UPS nationwide.

But the day before negotiations with UPS, Hall flew to New York and visited with drivers in Maspeth to offer support to the 250 drivers.

The next day, Local 804 leaders, international union officials, and UPS executives met and hammered out the agreement.

All 250 terminations were reduced to 10-day suspensions. Local 804 will also issue a statement to members outlining the proper union procedures for a walkout.

A Teakettle on a Flame

“The buildup of frustration causes people to do things they wouldn't normally do,” Sylvester said. “You can only put a teakettle on a flame for so long before the lid comes off.”

New York drivers were fed up with long hours, increasing production standards, and constant technological surveillance, Sylvester said. Every UPS truck is equipped with more than 200 sensors that monitor drivers' every move, and drivers are expected to follow 72 pages of “methods,” such as hold the keys in your right hand as you approach your vehicle, start the truck and buckle your seat belt in one motion.

Labor Notes asked Curcio if he was surprised his union would do so much. “I expected at least what they did,” he said. “Something of this magnitude, so severe, that touched so many people—something had to be done.”

Issues: UPSNY-NJ TDU
Categories: Labor News, Unions

ITF backs workers in Europe

ITF - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 02:26
ITF and ETF representatives and affiliates demonstrated alongside thousands of workers in Brussels to demand decent jobs for Europe last week.
Categories: Union Federations

Pages

Subscribe to Transport Workers Solidarity Committee aggregator