Feed aggregator

Israel: UN Ceasefire Call Must Be Respected

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITUC
Categories: Labor News

LA Mayor Garcetti Helps Broker Trucker Picketing Cooling Period-ILWU Tops Extended Contract To Limit Solidarity

Current News - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 16:05

LA Mayor Garcetti Helps Broker Trucker Picketing Cooling Period-ILWU Tops Extended Contract To Limit Solidarity
http://www.gazettes.com/news/update-garcetti-helps-broker-trucker-picket...
By Jonathan Van Dyke
Staff Writer | Posted 4 hours ago

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti brokered a pause on Saturday regarding truck driver labor unrest at the Port of Long Beach and Port of Los Angeles. Some truckers had been picketing three companies at the Port of Long Beach for the entire week.

“Following the city’s meetings with both sides, the Teamsters have agreed to pull down their pickets and enter a cooling off period to allow the Harbor Commission time to investigate the serious allegations regarding worker safety, poor working conditions and unfair labor practices,” Garcetti said in a statement. “Business at the port is back to normal and the city will facilitate a dialog among the parties in the weeks ahead.”

On Monday, July 7, truckers, with the guidance of Teamsters-led Justice for Port Drivers, began to picket at three Port of Long Beach container terminals: ITS on Pier G, Long Beach Container Terminal on Pier F and Total Terminal International on Pier T. Many other labor groups and passionate community members joined them.

“Teamsters are providing support, but it’s all (coming from) the truck drivers,” said Barb Maynard, spokesperson for Justice for Port Drivers.

The picketing continued through Friday, before Garcetti stepped in. The truckers are specifically aligned against trucking companies Green Fleet Systems, Total Transportation Services and Pacific Nine Transportation.

On Thursday, July 10, many other drivers met at The Grand Long Beach to voice their displeasure with the Teamsters and the picketers. Harbor Trucking Association members were at the meeting, but said it was taking place at the behest of the truckers.

“The majority of Green Fleet employees do not want the union,” said Blanca Machado, driver for Green Fleet.

“If we don’t want the union, then we don’t have to have the union,” added Amado Zamora, also a Green Fleet driver. “Our company gives us what a union is supposedly going to offer us.”

According to the Green Fleet truckers there, about two-thirds of employee-drivers do not want to unionize. Several drivers for Pacific Nine Transportation, which contracts only with owner/operators, also were present, and echoed the anti-union sentiments.

Still many continued to picket through Friday, with representative claiming bad practices were occurring against the truckers.

“These strikes are about retaliation and labor practices,” Maynard said, noting picketers believed that all three companies were violating federal labor laws.

For a moment on Tuesday, July 8, it looked as though the picketers might be joined by the largest labor union at the Port of Long Beach and Port of Los Angeles, the ILWU, which has about 10,000 employees at the two ports.

That morning, just before 10 a.m., some longshore workers left their posts at one terminal to honor the picket lines, but by 11 a.m. a labor arbitrator ordered the workers back, Port of Long Beach Spokesman Lee Peterson said. Negotiations between the ILWU and Pacific Merchants Association remain ongoing, as that union’s six-year contract was up at the beginning of July.

Overall, the ILWU is negotiating for 20,000 longshore workers up and down the West Coast at 29 ports. Should, at some point, the negotiations get contentious and break off, a walk off would be crippling to the ports, officials say.

“Without the longshore workers, the terminals can’t operate,” Peterson said. “All facets of cargo movement and container movement are done by ILWU workers.”

On Thursday, trucking company officials said there was minimal disruption from the picketers.

“We’re obviously concerned about any disruption in service at the ports,” Harbor Trucking Association Executive Director Alex Cherin said. “Our organization supports both independent contractor and employee models. It’s frustrating for the drivers on a day-to-day basis getting in and out of the port, but overall it has had pretty minimal impact.”

Jonathan Van Dyke can be reached at jvandyke@gazettes.com.

Tags: Justice for Port Drivers
Categories: Labor News

IBT Picks Roadway labor relations man for YRC Board

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 13:39
Austin AlonzoKansas City Business JournalJuly 14, 2014View the original piece

Late Friday, the Overland Park-based less-than-truckload carrier (Nasdaq: YRCW) and the International Brotherhood of Teamsters announced that the union-nominated and the company-approvedDavidson will join YRC's nine-member board.

Davidson will fill the seat Harry Wilsonvacated in March. Wilson, the chairman and CEO of New York-based MAEVA Group LLC, resigned from the board after seeing the company through a financial restructuring in early 2014. Between February 2013 and March 2014, YRC paid MAEVA $12.5 million for its services.

Click here to read more at The Kansas City Business Journal.

Issues: Freight
Categories: Labor News, Unions

LIRR unions: Future workers' fate hinges on contract

Current News - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 13:09

LIRR unions: Future workers' fate hinges on contract
http://www.newsday.com/long-island/lirr-unions-future-workers-fate-hinge...
Originally published: July 13, 2014 6:37 PM
Updated: July 13, 2014 10:55 PM
By ALFONSO A. CASTILLO alfonso.castillo@newsday.com

An LIRR conductor checks on a commuter at Jamaica station July 8, 2014. (Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

For the LIRR unions, it is about the future.
With both the MTA and the unions agreeing to raises totaling 17 percent and first-time employee health care contributions, the key point of contention in the impasse involves the fate of the so-called "unborn" -- LIRR workers hired after a new contract is ratified.
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority wants new workers to contribute to their health care costs at twice the rate of current workers, pay 4 percent of pension costs permanently instead of just for their first 10 years as most current employees do, and take twice as long to achieve top pay -- up to 12 years in some cases.
RESOURCES: 10 ways to prep | 6 key answers | MTA's advice
LIVE: Latest LIRR alerts and commuting conditions
TELL US: Would a strike impact you? | Will there be a strike?
But Arthur Maratea, national vice president of the Transportation Communications Union, said he's received more than 200 emails from members urging their leadership, "Do not give up the new hires."
"It's going to split the workforce," said Maratea, who recalled joining the LIRR in 1988 -- just after the agency had shut down a pension system for workers hired before then. The MTA reinstated the pension about 10 years ago.
"Our members have told us, and that's who pays our salaries and that's who we represent . . . they're not going to give up the new guys," he said.
More than just creating rifts among colleagues, union officials said compromising the wages and benefits of future job holders would, in turn, compromise the quality of candidates applying for those jobs.
"Do you want to have somebody throw a switch and have . . . a head-on collision because you decided you were going to lower the qualifications?" said Anthony Simon, general chairman of the Sheet Metal, Air, Rail and Transportation Union. "You don't want to start reaching for the bottom for a job this dangerous."
Accepting concessions for future workers, MTA officials have said, is a common bargaining practice and would help the agency afford the deal over the long run. MTA chairman Thomas Prendergast last week disputed the unions' contention that the agency is "creating two classes of employees."
"At the end of the day, they will have the same pension benefits . . . They will have the same health care benefits . . . But we're asking [new] employees to pay more," Prendergast said. "I pay more than my parents did for health care."
Simon signaled that the union was willing to bend a little when it came to future workers, without sacrificing the quality of LIRR jobs or the workers who fill them. "You can maintain the future of new employees if you go by what we know can be done," he said.
Because, by the MTA's admission, both sides' proposals would cost the agency about $40 million annually in the first few years of the contract, Simon said the MTA should accept the unions' demands and "live to fight another day." Any agreement would be retroactive to 2010, when workers' last contract lapsed, so the unions and the MTA could be back at the table in just 18 months. Complicating talks, union leaders say, is how the MTA has treated the federally mandated contract resolution process. The agency has rejected the recommendations of two Presidential Emergency Boards.
The MTA has said the two rulings were no more than nonbinding recommendations, but Maratea pointed out that even when the MTA lost a binding arbitration ruling against subway workers in 2009, it refused to pay and took the union to court, where it lost again.
"This is our industry. Those are the rules. The MTA just does not want to play by the rules," Maratea said. "The process must be preserved."
MTA spokesman Adam Lisberg called the union's sentiments "the height of hypocrisy" and noted that when a Presidential Emergency Board in 1994 ruled in management's favor, the unions "told the president to stay out of it."

Tags: LIRR UnionsMATConcession Bargaining
Categories: Labor News

2nd Baldwin community meeting on transit a success!

Pittsburghers for Public Transit - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 12:59

50 Baldwin residents came to the community meeting on Wed July 9th to participate in the campaign to restore transit service in the neighborhood. Residents discussed 2 possible routes, and they developed plans for next steps. 
One committee is developing a petition campaign. Another is planning to staff a table at Baldwin Community Day on Aug 2nd to get more residents involved in the campaign. A third committee is planning a "walk for transit." Each committee is meeting within the next two weeks.
If you would like to get involved, please contact: info@pittsburghforpublictransit.org or call 412-216-9659.
The next large community meeting is Tues, Aug 5th at 7 pm, at the Baldwin Borough Building auditorium, 3344 Churchview Ave.
Categories: Labor News

ITF helps people of Gaza

ITF - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 08:25
With the death toll rising daily in Gaza the ITF today called for an immediate ceasefire and launched an urgent humanitarian appeal for those affected.
Categories: Union Federations

Another Canadian National Railway Derailment in Alberta

Railroaded's Blog - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 07:10

The fifth reported Canadian National Railway derailment in 6 weeks in Alberta occurred July 12 north of Three Hills, about 60 kilometres northeast of Calgary (CBC News). 15 cars derailed, causing disruptions to transportation services in the area. Most of the cars carried general consumer merchandise, while 2 carried chemicals for household and industrial use. Alberta Emergency Alert indicated a local road was closed for an undisclosed length of time.

Other reported CN derailments in Alberta during the past 6 weeks include:

1. July 4: 6 cars carrying crude oil, methanol, lumber and gravel derailed and flipped over near Whitecourt.

2. June 27: 11 grain cars derailed near Chisholm.

3. June 11: 20 cars carrying dangerous goods residue, grain and lumber derailed near Faust.

4. May 30: About 50,000 litres of molten sulphur spilled from 3 of 7 derailed cars north of Lac La Biche.

See CN Railway Derailments, Other Accidents and Incidents for hundreds of additional CN derailments in North America.

The number of main-track and non-main-track derailments in Canada has recently been reported to be increasing significantly since the Lac-Mégantic oil train disaster that killed 47 people last July.


Filed under: Canadian National Railway, Derailment
Categories: Labor News

Israel: L’appel au cessez-le-feu de l’ONU doit être respecté

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 07/13/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: CSI
Categories: Labor News

Dangerous Goods Rail Accidents Rising Following Lac-Megantic Oil Train Disaster

Railroaded's Blog - Sun, 07/13/2014 - 11:58

There were more railway accidents in Canada involving dangerous goods in 2014 than during the same time period last year; in fact, dangerous goods accidents increased by over 21%.

CTV News recently reported, “According to the Transportation Safety Board of Canada, there were 74 instances of railway accidents involving dangerous goods from January to May 2014, compared to 61 from January to May 2013. During those same time periods, non-main-track derailments (involving dangerous goods) increased from 38 to 49″, a 29% increase.

The number of main-track derailments from January to May involving dangerous goods increased by 20% from 2013 to 2014. The number of non-main-track collisions involving dangerous goods during the same time period increased by over 15% from 2013 to 2014.

The total number of non-main-track derailments from January to May involving 1 or 2 cars increased from 177 in 2013 to 224 in 2014, a 27% increase. The number of non-main-track derailments involving 3+ cars increased by over 14% from 2013 to 2014.

The total number of main-track derailments from January to May involving 1 or 2 cars increased by over 9% from 2013 to 2014, and the number of main-track derailments involving 3+ cars increased by over 15% from 2013 to 2014.

The number of rail accidents that involved fires/explosions from January to May increased by a whopping 86% from 2013 to 2014.

The number of train incidents from January to May increased by 7% from 2013 to 2014, and the number of dangerous goods leaker incidents increased by over 19% from 2013 to 2014.

It is important to note that the above statistics represent only those data reported to the TSB by Canadian railways. There has been a history of under-reporting in this regard.

Although Transport Canada has made, or will be making, some changes to regulations in an attempt to improve rail safety, municipalities and rail safety experts are calling for more meaningful changes to address the ever-increasing transport of dangerous goods, including crude oil, by rail. Transport Action Canada President Harry Gow recently said the Lac-Mégantic oil train disaster was a wake-up call for the federal government (CTV News). The Transportation Safety Board had been recommending for decades that Transport Canada tighten up its rail safety rules, appoint more inspectors and generally do more work to improve safety. Unfortunately, during the past few decades, Transport Canada had all but relinquished its rail safety oversight responsibilities to the rail industry, permitting industry to monitor itself and to provide incomplete reporting to government.

Gow said some of the changes that would improve rail safety are not possible; for example, installing bypasses away from populated areas would be too expensive of an undertaking, and as Roger Annis recently wrote in Truthout, “It would cost vast sums to upgrade tracks and wagons, route trains around the largest or most vulnerable population centres, lower train speeds, and so on. The railways and oil shippers are having none of it.” Annis considers oil train safety an oxymoron, and suggests transporting crude oil by rail cannot be made safe. If this indeed is the case, and in light of the Lac-Mégantic oil train disaster a year ago, our federal and provincial governments will eventually be forced to make a decision about what is more important…continuation of the out-of-control pace of oil extraction and transport by rail…or people’s lives.


Filed under: Derailment, shipping oil by rail, Transport Canada, Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Categories: Labor News

Truckers at 2 Calif. ports OK cooling off period

Current News - Sat, 07/12/2014 - 22:18

Truckers at 2 Calif. ports OK cooling off period
http://www.sfgate.com/news/us/article/Truckers-at-2-Calif-ports-OK-cooli...
Updated 2:59 pm, Saturday, July 12, 2014

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Truck drivers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach agreed Saturday to a cooling-off period following five days of striking that briefly shut the massive ports.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said he requested the cooling-off period, and the truckers agreed Saturday to pull down pickets while the city's harbor commission investigates their allegations of poor working conditions and unfair labor practices.

"The city will facilitate a dialogue among the parties in the weeks ahead," he said in a statement.

The drivers agreed to resume work Monday after three trucking companies agreed to accept all drivers back to work without retaliation and without being forced to sign away all future rights in new truck leases, said Barb Maynard, a spokeswoman for a campaign to organize truckers.

On Monday, 120 drivers began striking against Green Fleet Systems, Total Transportation Services Inc. and Pacific 9 Transportation Inc. They said the companies have prevented them from unionizing and improperly classified them as contractors — rather than full-time employees — to minimize wages and benefits. They say that their paychecks often register below minimum wage once the cost of renting and maintaining a truck is factored in, and they have filed lawsuits and complaints with state and federal labor agencies to change their status.

The companies counter that pay is good and those picketing do not represent the majority of drivers.

Cargo moved normally, but on Tuesday nearly 1,000 dockworkers at four of the ports' 14 terminals left their posts in solidarity with the truckers. The walkout briefly disrupted the movement of international cargo before an arbitrator ruled the job action was not permissible and ordered dockworkers to resume loading and unloading ships.

The action came as the union representing dockworkers at 29 West Coast ports negotiate a new contract.

The ports are the primary West Coast gateway for hundreds of billions of dollars of annual trade with Asia.

The three trucking companies have about 400 trucks registered at the Port of Los Angeles — about 10 percent of those that operate on a regular day, port spokesmanPhillip Sanfield said.

Tags: port truckers
Categories: Labor News

Truckers at 2 Calif. ports OK cooling off period

Current News - Sat, 07/12/2014 - 22:18

Truckers at 2 Calif. ports OK cooling off period
http://www.sfgate.com/news/us/article/Truckers-at-2-Calif-ports-OK-cooli...
Updated 2:59 pm, Saturday, July 12, 2014

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Truck drivers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach agreed Saturday to a cooling-off period following five days of striking that briefly shut the massive ports.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said he requested the cooling-off period, and the truckers agreed Saturday to pull down pickets while the city's harbor commission investigates their allegations of poor working conditions and unfair labor practices.

"The city will facilitate a dialogue among the parties in the weeks ahead," he said in a statement.

The drivers agreed to resume work Monday after three trucking companies agreed to accept all drivers back to work without retaliation and without being forced to sign away all future rights in new truck leases, said Barb Maynard, a spokeswoman for a campaign to organize truckers.

On Monday, 120 drivers began striking against Green Fleet Systems, Total Transportation Services Inc. and Pacific 9 Transportation Inc. They said the companies have prevented them from unionizing and improperly classified them as contractors — rather than full-time employees — to minimize wages and benefits. They say that their paychecks often register below minimum wage once the cost of renting and maintaining a truck is factored in, and they have filed lawsuits and complaints with state and federal labor agencies to change their status.

The companies counter that pay is good and those picketing do not represent the majority of drivers.

Cargo moved normally, but on Tuesday nearly 1,000 dockworkers at four of the ports' 14 terminals left their posts in solidarity with the truckers. The walkout briefly disrupted the movement of international cargo before an arbitrator ruled the job action was not permissible and ordered dockworkers to resume loading and unloading ships.

The action came as the union representing dockworkers at 29 West Coast ports negotiate a new contract.

The ports are the primary West Coast gateway for hundreds of billions of dollars of annual trade with Asia.

The three trucking companies have about 400 trucks registered at the Port of Los Angeles — about 10 percent of those that operate on a regular day, port spokesmanPhillip Sanfield said.

Tags: port truckers
Categories: Labor News

Nigeria: Unions, Government and Employers Strike Deal Over HIV and AIDS

Labourstart.org News - Sat, 07/12/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: CLC
Categories: Labor News

Cambodia: Will Adidas garment workers share in its World Cup profit?

Labourstart.org News - Sat, 07/12/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Guardian
Categories: Labor News

City will lock out Canadian Guelph Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) Local 1189 transit workers, suspend services

Current News - Sat, 07/12/2014 - 08:22

City will lock out Canadian Guelph Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) Local 1189 transit workers, suspend services
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener-waterloo/city-will-lock-out-guel...
CBC News Posted: Jul 11, 2014 9:36 PM ET Last Updated: Jul 12, 2014 12:17 AM ET

The City of Guelph and Guelph Transit have decided to lock out their employees and suspend services after transit workers voted 186 to 12 against the city's final offer on Friday night.

At 12:01 on Monday morning, buses will stop running and workers will be locked out until the labour dispute between the city and members of the Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) Local 1189 is resolved.

In an update, the city says it "believes it has exhausted all traditional negotiation options" and that "this is the only course of action that can lead to a fair contract that balances competitive compensation for employees, fair rates for transit customers and long-term affordability for Guelph taxpayers."

Guelph transit workers have been without a collective agreement for over a year and, although bargaining with the city began in October 2013, negotiations came to a standstill after 22 sessions.

After bringing in a provincially appointed conciliator, the city requested a no board report, which put it in a legal lock-out position and the union in a legal strike position.

On June 26, the city presented its transit workers with a final offer, which included wage increases and no change to employee health and medical benefits. As of July 1, 2013, employees would receive a wage increase of 1.7 per cent; in 2014, an increase of 1.6 per cent; in 2015, 1.6 per cent; and in 2016, 1.5 per cent.

Although the city called its offer "fair and equitable," 94 per cent of the votes cast between 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. on Friday were opposed to it.

"This round of bargaining was not about the wage increase. It's about our working conditions. It's about being treated with respect," said ATU Local 1189 president Andrew Cleary, although he wouldn't elaborate on why the city's deal was not enough for the union.

Cleary wants to return to the bargaining table, but there are no scheduled negotiation dates at the present time.

Tags: ATU 1180City of Guelph and Guelph Transitbus drivers
Categories: Labor News

PMA and ILWU Provide Update on Contract Talks

ILWU - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 17:06

SAN FRANCISCO (July 11, 2014) – The International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) and the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) today issued the following statement:

The parties have resumed negotiations following a three-day break during which the ILWU was engaged in an unrelated negotiation in the Pacific Northwest. We plan on negotiating into the weekend. Although there is currently no contract in place, both parties have pledged to keep cargo moving.

The PMA and ILWU are negotiating a new contract covering nearly 20,000 longshore workers at 29 West Coast ports.

Download a PDF of the press release here.

Categories: Unions

Lyft and Uber Rebrand Illegal Cab Industry, at Workers’ Expense

Current News - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 13:14

Lyft and Uber Rebrand Illegal Cab Industry, at Workers’ Expense
http://labornotes.org/blogs/2014/07/video-lyft-and-uber-rebrand-illegal-...

July 10, 2014 / Labor Notes Staffenlarge or shrink textlogin or register to comment
19 69

“It’s not just the slick app, I think it’s the money behind the app,” said Julia Kann, explaining how Uber’s wealthy backers are getting away with their trendy, high-tech repackaging of unlicensed taxi cabs. Video: The Zero Hour with RJ Eskow.

Pink mustached-cars are rolling into New York City—like it or not.

Despite the city’s taxi commission ruling rideshare app Lyft illegal, the start-up plans to flood the taxi market in Brooklyn and Queens tomorrow.

Days earlier, Transport for London ignored the complaints of thousands of taxi drivers and granted permission for another rideshare company, Uber, to roll into that city, though legal challenges continue.

“It’s not just the slick app, I think it’s the money behind the app,” says Julia Kann.

In an interview with The Zero Hour, she explained how Uber’s wealthy backers are getting away with their trendy, high-tech repackaging of unlicensed taxi cabs.

“A lot of folks call this the ‘share economy,’ which sounds very communitarian and progressive, but really it’s a libertarian ideal,” she said.

Taxi drivers in the U.S. and Europe are standing up to the apps, staging gridlock actions that snare up traffic for hours to draw attention to the problem.

Why are they so angry? Kann writes:

These companies pride themselves on “disrupting” the taxi industry. Or to put it another way, “it’s making a full-time job into precarious labor,” said San Francisco Cab Drivers Association President Barry Korengold. And drivers say Uber and its ilk are pushing dangerous deregulation…

“Drivers used to be employees, [but] bosses destroyed that and made them independent contractors,” says the National Taxi Workers Alliance’s Biju Matthews. “Now they’re destroying that and trying to make them sub-independent contractors.”

Under the guise of a progressive-minded “sharing economy,” rich companies like Uber, Airbnb, and Taskrabbit are dissecting work into smaller, discrete tasks—a way to evade regulations that once protected workers, and to saddle workers with costs and risks that employers once covered.
To read more on how drivers are responding to the tech “disruption,” click here.

- See more at: http://labornotes.org/blogs/2014/07/video-lyft-and-uber-rebrand-illegal-...

Tags: taxi workers
Categories: Labor News

Ad campaign warns of threat of inexperienced tug operators

ILWU - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 11:08

Ads by Masters, Mates & Pilots and the Inlandboatmen’s Union ‘allege safety, environmental risks brought on by lockout by grain companies,’ reports the Columbian:

“Two maritime unions said Monday they’ve launched a radio ad campaign to focus attention on what they say are safety and environmental risks to the Columbia and Willamette rivers brought on by a lockout of union dockworkers by two grain companies.

The ads, paid for by the International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots and the Inlandboatmen’s Union, say United Grain Corp. at the Port of Vancouver and Columbia Grain in Portland are “using inexperienced crews to move cargo” on the Columbia and Willamette rivers.

United Grain and Columbia Grain “have called in a fly-by-night tug and towboat operator using questionable equipment and tugboat personnel with no prior experience on the Columbia and Willamette rivers,” Alan Cote, president of the Inlandboatmen’s Union, said in a news release. “Unqualified boat operators jeopardize the safety of commerce on our rivers and invite an environmental disaster.”

The maritime unions say they’re joined by environmentalists in running the ad campaign, which also urges listeners to sign an online petition, www.SaveNWrivers.com.”

Listen to the radio spot here.

 

 

Categories: Unions

Unions fight back over public sector pay

ITF - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 07:25
The UK saw its biggest strike this century yesterday, Thursday 10 July, as public sector workers joined together to demand better conditions.
Categories: Union Federations

IAM Delta lands in London

ITF - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 05:30
Activists from the IAM (International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers) brought their campaign for rights for Delta Air Lines workers to London, England this week.
Categories: Union Federations

Coca Cola holds captive audience meeting in GA to stop Teamsters, workers record it and expose union busters

Current News - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 17:22

Coca Cola holds captive audience meeting in GA to stop Teamsters, workers record it and expose union busters
https://soundcloud.com/organizega/coca-cola-capitve-audience-anti-union-...
Recorded on July 9, 2014 in Atlanta, GA at the South Metro distribution center in College Park. Here Coca Cola's Director of Labor Relations Brian LaVelle and his assistant force workers to attend a mandatory (mis)'information session' about the Teamsters union. Listen when workers push back and demand to know how much the union busters get paid for running such meetings. Powerful audio here. Go behind closed doors at Coke's anti-union meetings.

Tags: Coketeamsters
Categories: Labor News

Pages

Subscribe to Transport Workers Solidarity Committee aggregator