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Greece: Cleaners swept out of work after Tsipras U-turn

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: CNBC
Categories: Labor News

Iran: Mobilisation continues to release Iran teacher unionist

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Education International
Categories: Labor News

CONTRACT NOW! CWA AFT SFO Flight Attendants, UAL Teamsters and Other Workers Demand A Contract

Current News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 16:18

CONTRACT NOW! CWA AFT SFO Flight Attendants, UAL Teamsters and Other Workers Demand A Contract
http://youtu.be/QfzYj3IVHkk
On July 16, 2015, an international day of action at airports throughout the world to get a contract for the 24,000 UAL AFA flight attendants. They have been without a contract for longer than 3 years and hundreds marched and rallied in San Francisco.
Production of Labor Video Project
www.laborvideo.org

Tags: CWA AFAContractUALIBTsolidarity
Categories: Labor News

What would the “Promises Act” mean for Central States Teamsters?

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 07:52

July 16, 2015: The Keep Our Pension Promises Act, introduced in the US Senate and House would keep promises made to over 200,000 Teamster retirees as well as to working Teamsters who retire in the future.

That’s why Teamsters and retiree committees are mobilizing – along with other unions, the AARP, and pension advocates – to back it.

Read the Pension Rights Center’s summary on how the Promises Act Would Save the Central States Fund.

The Pension Rights Center also has an explanation of how the Pension Promises Act would work.

The IBT has endorsed the bill, which is a good first step. But Hoffa is not yet putting Teamster political muscle behind it. We call on all Teamster leaders – and the Teamster trustees of the Central States Fund, to support our retirees, our future, and keep our pension funds strong and viable.

Issues: Pension and Benefits
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Uber Could Have to Pay an Additional $209 Million to Reclassify Its Drivers in California

Current News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 06:56

Uber Could Have to Pay an Additional $209 Million to Reclassify Its Drivers in California
http://recode.net/2015/07/14/uber-could-have-to-pay-an-additional-209-mi...

By Carmel DeAmicis

July 14, 2015, 3:00 AM PDT

Uber says many of its drivers prefer being contract workers to full-fledged employees, a blunt response to a raging debate among on-demand startups. Of course, that answer suits Uber very well, since its business is founded on that very idea — to say nothing of its purported $40 billion value.

And that’s why it’s currently fighting a lawsuit that would otherwise force it to reclassify its California drivers as employees.

So what would it cost the company if it lost its suit? Uber declined to comment*, but Re/code built a rough model with the help of ZenPayroll, the startup that automates paycheck systems for small- and medium-sized businesses. We calculated that Uber could pay an additional $208.7 million a year if it had to reclassify its California drivers.

It breaks down to about $89.1 million for payroll taxes for 45,000 drivers working 20 hours a week in the state, and roughly $119.6 million per year in workers’ compensation insurance. Altogether, it’s $4,637 per employee in California.

That doesn’t include the cost of gas or vehicle repair, which Uber would be legally required to cover under California Labor Code Section 2802.

We narrowed the parameters to just California, since that’s where a big chunk of its drivers work and because each state has different tax codes. Since Uber doesn’t publicly release how many drivers it has in California, we used some available data to make estimates and worked with SherpaShare, a third-party application that helps ride-share drivers track their work (see below for our methodology).

That additional $209 million in annual costs needs to compare against Uber’s revenue, which isn’t public. The most recent reported numbers put Uber’s sales at a $10 billion run rate through this year, and since it pays drivers 80 percent of the fare, Uber’s net annual run rate would be about $2 billion.

Looking just at California (which is likely still its largest driver base in the U.S.), the added cost of making drivers employees would account for a little over 10 percent of Uber’s net revenue, not a small portion. But it’s not insurmountable, especially given Uber’s rapid growth.

The company, led by CEO Travis Kalanick, is fighting driver classification lawsuits state by state, and thanks to the fragmentation of the legal system there’s unlikely to be a nationally binding precedent unless a group of drivers successfully file and win a class action suit for the entire country.

What makes Uber special in the eyes of investors is its lower costs. It’s basically a piece of software connecting drivers to riders, which, for now, means it doesn’t have to pay those drivers’ health care, payroll taxes or workers’ compensation insurance.

If Uber does have to reclassify, it wouldn’t just be hit by additional taxes — it could suffer major penalties for all the drivers it had mis-classified up until now. FedEx, perhaps the closest parallel, had to pay a $228 million settlement when it lost a class action suit about the way it classified its California drivers.

To do a deeper dive into the numbers, here’s how we calculated Uber’s payroll costs.

Number of drivers
To estimate the number of drivers Uber has in California, we cobbled together a few sources. In May, Uber publicly said it has around 20,000 drivers in the San Francisco Bay Area. Uber’s Los Angeles General Manager told driver analytics tool SherpaShare in February that Uber’s L.A. market has 10,000 active drivers. SherpaShare estimates 15,000 or so others scattered around the rest of the state in places like San Diego and Santa Barbara. That brings us to roughly 45,000 active drivers in California.

Number of hours
We don’t have the average number of hours drivers work each week for Uber. It varies from person to person and there’s a high rate of turnover. For the sake of the model, we estimated that each driver in California was driving 20 hours a week.

We estimated that drivers in California make roughly $21.29 per hour by averaging the $17.07 per hour that L.A. drivers make and the $25.51 per hour that S.F. drivers make — those numbers came from a study commissioned by Uber.

ZenPayroll calculation
Cost of 45,000 employees working 20 hours a week at $21.29 per hour

Gross Wages: $996,372,000.00

Social Security (6.2 percent): $61,775,064.00

Medicare (1.45 percent): $14,447,394.00

California Unemployment* (3.4 percent): $10,710,000.00

California Employment Training Tax** (.1 percent): $315,000.00

Federal Unemployment** (.6 percent): $1,890,000.00

Total Employer Taxes per year: $89,137,458.00

* The new employer rate in CA for unemployment is 3.4 percent and is used for a period of two to three years. It’s worth noting it can change over time based on the turnover rates of a particular company.

** The percentage wage base limit for California and Federal Unemployment is calculated based on a capped salary of $7000 per employee per year. These calculations assume zero annual turnover for all 45,000 employees. High turnover can drastically increase these taxes by millions of dollars.

Workers’ compensation
Workers’ compensation insurance rates change depending on local regions and depend on the deals companies strike with brokers. AP Intego Insurance Group estimated the annual cost for a transportation company like Uber in California would be approximately 12 percent of each driver’s salary.

Expenses and benefits
Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, Uber wouldn’t be required to pay for drivers’ health care — it would just need to negotiate a group rate, and drivers would cover their own premiums. For the sake of simplicity, we left out other variable costs like vacation accrual, overtime pay and expenses (like gas and car repair). You can imagine the latter would be a huge cost for Uber.

*Update: Uber declined to comment on Re/code’s analysis and instead offered this statement: “As employees, drivers would lose the flexibility and control they value most; instead they would drive set shifts, earn a fixed hourly wage, and lose the ability to drive with other ridesharing platforms.” The company also added that 73 percent of its “partners” prefer being their own boss instead of having a job with benefits and a salary.

Tags: UberDrivers
Categories: Labor News

The SFMTA should lower the taxicab medallion transfer price "What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck."

Current News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 06:11

The SFMTA should lower the taxicab medallion transfer price "What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck."
http://www.sfexaminer.com/the-sfmta-should-lower-the-taxicab-medallion-t...
By Peter Kirby on July 15, 2015 7:26 pm
Career taxicab drivers are now being forced to buy taxicab medallions, rather than earning and receiving them for a one-time nominal fee. In recent years, the value of a medallion has dropped like a stone while the medallion price set by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency has remained the same. Medallion transfers (purchases) have slowed to a trickle. For these reasons, the SFMTA should be responsive to market conditions and lower the medallion transfer price.

When I put my name on the taxicab medallion waiting list in 1998, I agreed to a deal whereby when my name got to the top of the list, I would be granted a taxicab medallion for a one-time fee of maybe a couple of thousand dollars. Once granted, I would take that medallion to the taxicab company of my choice and from there on out receive checks in the amount of about $2,300 per month for as long as I held the medallion. This was to be on top of whatever I made driving the cab. When I retired from the industry, the medallion was to go back to The City. That was a profit-sharing program, which provides for a middle class. That lets working-class people buy houses, raise kids and put them through college. It was a situation that provided working-class people with a secure financial future.

Then came the SFMTA’s medallion sales programs. Without being given an opt-out, the SFMTA changed the terms of my agreement without my consent. No longer could I earn a medallion for a one-time fee. Now I am forced to buy a medallion for $250,000 with a minimum down payment of $12,500 and about a 5 percent interest rate to pay off the rest over 30 years. Sure, I get to sell it when I’m done with it, but I need money now and, under the former deal, I could save for my future. As it stands now, I can forget about raising kids properly or buying a house.

Not only that, but in the meantime The City has allowed Uber and the other Transportation Network Companies to suck most of the profits out of the taxicab industry. Now that it’s time for me to get my medallion, there are hardly any profits to share.

Taxicab companies have had to drastically lower the amount of monthly medallion holder payments. In many cases, the monthly checks made out to medallion holders have fallen below the monthly amounts those medallion holders must pay to pay off their medallion.

What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck. As long as the TNCs are allowed to operate, they will continue to devalue taxicab medallions. Although the SFMTA does not report any medallion loan defaults yet, these are sure to happen as long as Uber is allowed to operate and continue sucking the profits out of our industry. One can see how this might give potential medallion purchasers pause.

While the value of a medallion has fallen precipitously, the price has remained at $250,000 since the medallion sales programs started in 2010. The number of taxicab medallion transfers have slowed almost to a standstill. Market conditions demand the SFMTA go about lowering the medallion transfer price. It would be a good turn for taxicab drivers and the SFMTA.
On Tuesday, I will address the SFMTA board at its regular meeting and ask Director of Transportation Ed Reiskin to initiate the process of lowering the medallion transfer price. I will be suggesting a price between $125,000 and $150,000. If you agree, please show up and voice your support. Thank you.

Peter A. Kirby is a cab driver in San Francisco.

Tags: UberMTA
Categories: Labor News

The SFMTA should lower the taxicab medallion transfer price "What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck."

Current News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 06:11

The SFMTA should lower the taxicab medallion transfer price "What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck."
http://www.sfexaminer.com/the-sfmta-should-lower-the-taxicab-medallion-t...
By Peter Kirby on July 15, 2015 7:26 pm
Career taxicab drivers are now being forced to buy taxicab medallions, rather than earning and receiving them for a one-time nominal fee. In recent years, the value of a medallion has dropped like a stone while the medallion price set by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency has remained the same. Medallion transfers (purchases) have slowed to a trickle. For these reasons, the SFMTA should be responsive to market conditions and lower the medallion transfer price.

When I put my name on the taxicab medallion waiting list in 1998, I agreed to a deal whereby when my name got to the top of the list, I would be granted a taxicab medallion for a one-time fee of maybe a couple of thousand dollars. Once granted, I would take that medallion to the taxicab company of my choice and from there on out receive checks in the amount of about $2,300 per month for as long as I held the medallion. This was to be on top of whatever I made driving the cab. When I retired from the industry, the medallion was to go back to The City. That was a profit-sharing program, which provides for a middle class. That lets working-class people buy houses, raise kids and put them through college. It was a situation that provided working-class people with a secure financial future.

Then came the SFMTA’s medallion sales programs. Without being given an opt-out, the SFMTA changed the terms of my agreement without my consent. No longer could I earn a medallion for a one-time fee. Now I am forced to buy a medallion for $250,000 with a minimum down payment of $12,500 and about a 5 percent interest rate to pay off the rest over 30 years. Sure, I get to sell it when I’m done with it, but I need money now and, under the former deal, I could save for my future. As it stands now, I can forget about raising kids properly or buying a house.

Not only that, but in the meantime The City has allowed Uber and the other Transportation Network Companies to suck most of the profits out of the taxicab industry. Now that it’s time for me to get my medallion, there are hardly any profits to share.

Taxicab companies have had to drastically lower the amount of monthly medallion holder payments. In many cases, the monthly checks made out to medallion holders have fallen below the monthly amounts those medallion holders must pay to pay off their medallion.

What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck. As long as the TNCs are allowed to operate, they will continue to devalue taxicab medallions. Although the SFMTA does not report any medallion loan defaults yet, these are sure to happen as long as Uber is allowed to operate and continue sucking the profits out of our industry. One can see how this might give potential medallion purchasers pause.

While the value of a medallion has fallen precipitously, the price has remained at $250,000 since the medallion sales programs started in 2010. The number of taxicab medallion transfers have slowed almost to a standstill. Market conditions demand the SFMTA go about lowering the medallion transfer price. It would be a good turn for taxicab drivers and the SFMTA.
On Tuesday, I will address the SFMTA board at its regular meeting and ask Director of Transportation Ed Reiskin to initiate the process of lowering the medallion transfer price. I will be suggesting a price between $125,000 and $150,000. If you agree, please show up and voice your support. Thank you.

Peter A. Kirby is a cab driver in San Francisco.

Tags: UberMTA
Categories: Labor News

Global: Congratulations Amazon – 20 years of precarious work and low wages – shame on you!

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 07/15/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: UNI Global Union
Categories: Labor News

China: Video explains struggle of Artigas workers with English subtitle

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 07/15/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Global Solidarity action
Categories: Labor News

Movement to Save Pension Grows

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Wed, 07/15/2015 - 14:10

July 15, 2015: The movement to head off pension cuts and protect Teamster pensions continues to grow, even as the Central States Fund plans to announce their intention to slash earned pensions.

The latest committee to form is the Missouri - Kansas City Committee to Protect Pensions, which is building support for the Keep Our Pension Promises Act. Over 100 retirees and Teamsters packed their first meeting on July 6.

Here is a partial list of upcoming meetings where you can get informed and involved. If you are in another area, contact us and we will tell you what’s being organized in your area. Committees have formed in most states in the Central and Southern areas, and all have Facebook pages.

All the various pension committees are contacting and visiting the staffs of Senators and Congressional Representatives, as well as demanding that the Central States Fund delay their plan to try to cut pensions.  All committees are open to working Teamsters, as well as retirees and spouses.

A plan is in the works for a Rally and Lobby Day in Washington DC. Details should be announced soon. To stay informed, get in touch.

Teamster President James Hoffa has come out in favor of the Promises Act, but so far has done little to put Teamster muscle behind it, and has not used his influence to get the Central States Trustees to shift course and support the Promises Act.

Issues: Pension and Benefits
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Teamsters United Volunteers in Action

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Wed, 07/15/2015 - 11:36

July 15, 2015: With the August 15 deadline closing in, Teamster volunteers are picking up the pace in the drive to collect 50,000 signatures to accredit Tim Sylvester and the Teamsters United Slate.

Once the petition drive is completed, Tim Sylvester and Teamsters United will be certified by the Election Supervisor as official accredited candidates against Hoffa-Hall.

The petition drive is an all-volunteer effort. Members are downloading petitions and leaflets from the Teamsters United website and collecting signatures Teamster-to-Teamster.

“We’ve collected over 3,000 petitions so far in Chicago Local 705 and we’re just gearing up,” said Dave Bernt. “Members want new direction in our International Union and they’re eager to sign.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Southern California, Teamster petitioners are reaching out in grocery, waste, UPS and freight. “The petition drive is a great way to educate members about the election and build the campaign,” said _______________.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“We’ve got 1,600 signatures so far in Local 177,” said Mark Timlin. “My focus has been reaching out to UPSers who Voted No in New Jersey and Philadelphia. We Voted No and got hit with concessions. Now it’s time to vote out Hoffa-Hall and that starts with this petition drive.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The petition drive is building momentum from coast-to-coast. If you’ve got completed petitions, send them in and keep going. Petitions should be returned to:

Teamsters United Campaign
315 Flatbush Avenue
Box 501
Brooklyn, NY 11217

For information on election rules and how to participate in the petition drive, contact TDU or phone us at 313-842-2600.

Campaign supporters on the move in Nashville.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Petitioning in Cerritos, CA., Local 396.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Labor News, Unions

Appeals Court Backs Kansas Ruling That FedEx Ground Drivers Are Employees

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Wed, 07/15/2015 - 09:27
Rip WatsonTransport TopicsJuly 15, 2015View the original piece

In the latest of a series of recent worker-status rulings, a federal appeals court upheld a Kansas Supreme Court decision last year that classified about 500 FedEx Ground drivers as employees rather than independent contractors under that state’s law. The decision by the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals followed a month after FedEx agreed to settle another worker status, in which the company maintained that workers were independent contractors. In the California case, FedEx agreed to pay $228 million to more than 2,000 drivers. Last week, a federal judge in Massachusetts ruled that drivers at Xpressman, a courier service, were contractors rather than employees.

Click here to read more.

Categories: Labor News, Unions

The Lessons of ILWU Local 10's May Day 2015 Action Against Racist Killings

Current News - Tue, 07/14/2015 - 23:51

The Lessons of ILWU Local 10's May Day 2015 Action Against Racist Killings
http://youtu.be/uC9hxY0cHZ4
On May 1, 2015 over 2,000 trade unionist, workers and community activists marched from the Port of Oakland which was shutdown by the ILWU Local 10 to Oakland City Hall.
On July 8, 2015 a meeting was held by ILWU Local 10 to discuss the lessons of this action and the continuing racist attacks in the bay area and nationally.
Stacey Rodgers who is on the ILWU Local 10 executive board and was organizer of the May 1 action chaired the meeting.
Production of Labor Video Project www.laborvideo.org

Tags: ILWU Local 2May DayPolice Murders
Categories: Labor News

FedEx Loses Appeal in Case on Classification of Kansas Drivers

Current News - Tue, 07/14/2015 - 21:51

FedEx Loses Appeal in Case on Classification of Kansas Drivers
http://www.wsj.com/articles/fedex-loses-appeal-in-case-on-classification...
State supreme court ruling that drivers are employees, not contractors, is upheld
By LAURA STEVENS
July 14, 2015 7:53 p.m. ET
FedEx Corp. said Tuesday it lost a long-running legal dispute with nearly 500 drivers in Kansas over its former practice of classifying some of its U.S. delivery drivers as independent contractors.

FedEx said it has lost a legal dispute with nearly 500 drivers in Kansas over its former practice of classifying some of its U.S. delivery drivers as independent contractorsPHOTO: AP
The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals last week issued an order and opinion concluding that members of a Kansas class-action suit are employees, not independent contractors. The court sided with the Kansas Supreme Court, which had issued a similar opinion last year.

“The application of Kansas law to FedEx’s relationship with its drivers has been authoritatively decided by the Kansas Supreme Court,” the Seventh Circuit Court said in its opinion.

The Kansas drivers sued FedEx Ground in 2003 to recoup retroactive costs and expenses, as well as overtime wages. FedEx, which disclosed the court decision in its annual filing with securities regulators, said it had already made provisions in case of a loss in the Kansas case.

FedEx hasn’t used the disputed independent-contractor business model since 2011, when it switched to using only incorporated businesses that employ its ground delivery drivers.

Other companies, including Uber Technologies Inc., have recently faced legal challenges due to their use of the independent-contractor model, and the FedEx decisions could influence those cases.

The decision may have a broader impact on 19 other class-action suits against FedEx currently pending before the Seventh Circuit. FedEx has asked that the other 19 cases be decided separately, due to differences in state laws. The Seventh Circuit last week referred those cases to a court representative to set up additional briefings and arguments.

Legal experts have said that the Kansas Supreme Court decision could affect rulings in the other cases, despite differences in state laws.

The decision follows a settlement by FedEx with California drivers in June. The company said it would pay $228 million to settle the case after a Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals panel ruled against the company on the issue last year.

Write to Laura Stevens at laura.stevens@wsj.com

Tags: FedExemployees
Categories: Labor News

UK: New Gvt Bill attacks unions to shift balance of power in workplace

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 07/14/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: TUC
Categories: Labor News

SF cable car operators call for safety reforms in wake of devastating injuries "Most operators who spoke with the Examiner feared reprisal for voicing

Current News - Tue, 07/14/2015 - 09:22

SF cable car operators call for safety reforms in wake of devastating injuries "Most operators who spoke with the Examiner feared reprisal for voicing their frustration with safety."
http://www.sfexaminer.com/sf-cable-car-operators-call-for-safety-reforms...

A cable car conductor walks in the street as the Powell and Market cable car makes it's way to the Market Street turnaround Friday, July 10, 2015. San Francisco cable car operators feel their safety is more compromised now than ever, and part of the reason is traffic congestion. (Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner)
By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez on July 13, 2015 10:00 pm

The day he found out he would become a cable car operator in 2003, Muni employee Santiago Montoya was thrilled. He called the drivers of these iconic vehicles “ambassadors to The City,” as cable cars are one of the top tourist attractions in San Francisco.

“It was his happiest day,” said his wife, Zonia Montoya.

Perhaps his worst day, however, was April 6 of this year. That’s when he was hit by a car while on the job. The collision destroyed his body, and he is still recovering in a Concord hospital.

Two months later, another cable car operator, Reynaldo Morante, was struck by a suspected drunken motorcyclist. Morante’s injuries were severe and he slipped into a coma. This week, he is expected to be taken off life support.

Spurred by Morante’s impending death and Montoya’s injuries, cable car operators are asking the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency for new safety measures for those who operate The City’s moving monuments.

In response to several San Francisco Examiner inquiries and Morante’s collision, the SFMTA said it is evaluating all signage within cable cars and along routes to assess any needed changes to increase safety.

“The SFMTA offers its deepest thoughts and condolences to the family and friends of Reynaldo Morante,” said agency chief Ed Reiskin. “Like his fellow conductors and gripmen, Reynaldo routinely ventured into mixed traffic conditions ensuring that the streets were safe for his passengers.”

Incidents like these, Reiskin said, bolster the SFMTA’s resolve to “improve safety for the general public and for our own employees.”

The agency is also developing what officials call a “cable car collision reduction program” and launching a campaign to make drivers more aware of passengers and operators as they exit the vehicles.

Cable cars were created in an era in which the only roadside worry was the occasional unruly horse. Fast forward nearly a century and a half, and cable cars operate on some of The City’s most trafficked and dangerous streets, safety studies show.

Most operators who spoke with the Examiner feared reprisal for voicing their frustration with safety. But retired Muni operator Irwin Lum, who was also a Transport Workers Union Local 250-A president, said the streets are busier than ever before.

“There’s more traffic and congestion out there as a whole, with Uber, Lyft and [commuter shuttles],” said Lum. “That congestion leads to more drivers being frustrated and violating traffic laws. The SFMTA and The City should do more with an educational campaign to motorists on the dangers of going around any Muni vehicle.”

At an April safety meeting of the SFMTA’s cable car division, operators asked for more police enforcement of existing traffic rules, such as California Vehicle Code section 21756. That provision prohibits vehicles from passing up streetcars while they load and unload passengers.

Operators, however, were not satisfied with the Police Department’s response.
“SFPD offered the following suggestions and reminders,” the meeting minutes read, for the SFMTA to “reach out to the rental car companies and hotels to let them know about driving in SF” and to “conduct a [public service announcement] campaign.”

Improving safety for cable car operators may be an uphill climb in other ways as well.
The day he was hit, Santiago Montoya was helping elderly passengers exit his cable car at Powell and Jackson streets near Chinatown. He noticed a vehicle speeding toward him. He tried to signal to the vehicle to stop, but “instead of slowing down they sped up,” Santiago Montoya said.

He was caught under the vehicle and dragged at least 30 feet.
Among Santiago Montoya’s 20 broken bones were his right leg, ribs, pelvis and left arm. He spent a month in intensive care, said Zonia Montoya. “It was horrifying,” she said.

After Santiago Montoya’s collision, the SFMTA handed out crossing-guard-style handheld stop signs and required operators and gripmen to wear yellow safety vests at all times.

In recent months, the transit agency has painted “red carpet” Muni and taxi-only lanes along Powell Street north toward Nob Hill. But after the hill crests at California Street, the red lane ends. Montoya was hit on a portion of Powell Street without red lanes.

Tags: TWU 250Ahealth and safetycable cars
Categories: Labor News

Daimler Testing Electric Trucks

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Tue, 07/14/2015 - 08:22
Transport TopicsJuly 14, 2015View the original piece

Daimler said it has successfully completed a yearlong consumer test of its electric battery-powered Fuso Canter E-Cell. The company tested eight trucks in Portugal, where the vehicles achieved a range of more than 62 miles and a payload of 2 tons, according to Daimler.

Click here to read more.

Categories: Labor News, Unions

Albertsons Cos. Files for IPO

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Tue, 07/14/2015 - 07:58
Kyle ShamorianProgressive GrocerJuly 14, 2015View the original piece

Albertsons Cos., the second-largest supermarket operator following its recent $9 billion merger with Safeway early this year, filed for an initial public offering on Wednesday.

The offering is listed to raise approximately $100 million, though the number of shares set to hit the trading floor has not yet been disclosed. Albertsons said it plans to use the IPO monies to pay down debt and fund other corporate initiatives. It also has plans to open new stores and upgrade others, including related recent news that it will open eight new and replacement stores in 2015 and remodel a total of 115 existing stores across most of its operating divisions.

Click here to read more.

Categories: Labor News, Unions

Greece: European Ministers Want Greece To Limit Ability Of Workers To Strike

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 07/13/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IBTimes
Categories: Labor News

Legislation offers workable solution to multiemployer plan underfunding

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Mon, 07/13/2015 - 10:20
Pensions & InvestmentsJuly 13, 2015View the original piece

Your June 29 editorial, “Defying economic reality,” does your readers a disservice by failing to accurately inform them about the Keep Our Pension Promises Act of 2015.

This legislation, introduced by Sen. Bernie Sanders, Rep. Marcy Kaptur and 11 other congressional co-sponsors, offers an economically workable solution to the cash-flow problems faced by severely troubled multiemployer plans, including the Teamsters Central States, Southeast and Southwest Areas Pension Fund. At the same time, it protects the hard-earned pensions of 1.5 million employees and retirees whose benefits could otherwise be cut by the hastily enacted and ill-considered provisions of the Multiemployer Pension Reform Act of 2014.

Click here to read more at Pension & Investments.

Issues: Pension and Benefits
Categories: Labor News, Unions

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