Feed aggregator

Germany: Can Unions Stop the Far-Right?

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Atlantic
Categories: Labor News

SF TWU 250a Drivers claim every new woman running in Muni union election was disqualified

Current News - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 13:32

SF TWU 250a Drivers claim every new woman running in Muni union election was disqualified

http://www.sfexaminer.com/drivers-claim-every-woman-running-muni-union-p...

Willa Johnson stands in a cable car on Powell St. in San Francsico on Nov. 8, 2017. (Daniel Kim/Special to S.F. Examiner)
By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez on November 9, 2017 1:00 am

Willa Johnson isn’t new to breaking glass ceilings — for about 10 years she’s served as San Francisco’s second-ever woman “grip” on a cable car.

It’s a tough job regarded for decades by Muni operators as a man’s job, one that requires the physical strength, concentration and tenacity to pull the stiff levers that grip a cable car’s cables and yank it up San Francisco’s steepest hills.

Now, Johnson is trying to break another glass ceiling by becoming the first-ever woman president of Muni’s operator union, the Transport Workers Union Local 250-A, and represent her 2,000-plus fellow members.

But Johnson and the four other women running for leadership positions at the TWU in the upcoming December election have been disqualified from running, which they allege is discrimination perpetrated by their union.

President Eric D. Williams, who presided during the controversial 2014 “sick out” that saw more than 700 Muni operators call in sick to work during contract negotiations with The City and crippled Muni service, is termed out as president in December. Four operators are now running: Rafael Cabrera, Roger Marenco, Andrew Simmons and DeJohn Williams.

Chairperson and union seats at Muni yards across The City are also up for elections, who help operators deal with grievances and management. None of the new candidates are women — and only two incumbents out of 28 available positions are women.

“I’m not wavering,” Johnson said.

She contacted the TWU International to allege discrimination against the would-be women leaders, as well as some fellow male members who also wished to run, who she said were also disqualified as candidates for allegedly dubious reasons.

“We love our union,” said LaCrecia Logan, a 20-year Muni operator who is running for the chair position of Muni’s Woods Division, a vehicle yard. “We just want to be treated fairly.”

LaCrecia Logan stands in front of a Muni bus on Market St. in San Francsico on Nov. 8, 2017. (Daniel Kim/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Karl Cato, chairman of the election committee for TWU Local 250-A, said in a statement to the San Francisco Examiner, “We are conducting the 2017 General Election in accordance with the Transport Workers Union of America, AFL-CIO International Constitution.”

Cato wrote that operators running for election needed to be in “good standing” by paying union dues for a period of 12 consecutive months, and attend at least 50 percent of membership meetings. He declined to answer any questions.

But Johnson, Logan and another operator running for office, Loree Woods-Bowman, contest they meet all the criteria. Johnson was out of work for a car accident for several months, she said, but was allowed to pay her dues once she came back to work by the union.

She showed the Examiner documentation from Cato clearing her to run for another office, as a delegate, despite the payment snafu from her car accident, which she says calls into question her disqualification for president.

Logan said the female candidates want to highlight issues for all operators, but particularly women and single mothers at Muni, who struggle under workplace rules — including a lack of bathroom breaks — that harm them in particular.

Johnson isn’t deterred by her union’s alleged discrimination.

“Women are born leaders,” she said.

Tags: TWU 250Adiscriminationwomen workersunion elections
Categories: Labor News

SF TWU 250a Drivers claim every new woman running in Muni union election was disqualified

Current News - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 13:32

SF TWU 250a Drivers claim every new woman running in Muni union election was disqualified

http://www.sfexaminer.com/drivers-claim-every-woman-running-muni-union-p...

Willa Johnson stands in a cable car on Powell St. in San Francsico on Nov. 8, 2017. (Daniel Kim/Special to S.F. Examiner)
By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez on November 9, 2017 1:00 am

Willa Johnson isn’t new to breaking glass ceilings — for about 10 years she’s served as San Francisco’s second-ever woman “grip” on a cable car.

It’s a tough job regarded for decades by Muni operators as a man’s job, one that requires the physical strength, concentration and tenacity to pull the stiff levers that grip a cable car’s cables and yank it up San Francisco’s steepest hills.

Now, Johnson is trying to break another glass ceiling by becoming the first-ever woman president of Muni’s operator union, the Transport Workers Union Local 250-A, and represent her 2,000-plus fellow members.

But Johnson and the four other women running for leadership positions at the TWU in the upcoming December election have been disqualified from running, which they allege is discrimination perpetrated by their union.

President Eric D. Williams, who presided during the controversial 2014 “sick out” that saw more than 700 Muni operators call in sick to work during contract negotiations with The City and crippled Muni service, is termed out as president in December. Four operators are now running: Rafael Cabrera, Roger Marenco, Andrew Simmons and DeJohn Williams.

Chairperson and union seats at Muni yards across The City are also up for elections, who help operators deal with grievances and management. None of the new candidates are women — and only two incumbents out of 28 available positions are women.

“I’m not wavering,” Johnson said.

She contacted the TWU International to allege discrimination against the would-be women leaders, as well as some fellow male members who also wished to run, who she said were also disqualified as candidates for allegedly dubious reasons.

“We love our union,” said LaCrecia Logan, a 20-year Muni operator who is running for the chair position of Muni’s Woods Division, a vehicle yard. “We just want to be treated fairly.”

LaCrecia Logan stands in front of a Muni bus on Market St. in San Francsico on Nov. 8, 2017. (Daniel Kim/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Karl Cato, chairman of the election committee for TWU Local 250-A, said in a statement to the San Francisco Examiner, “We are conducting the 2017 General Election in accordance with the Transport Workers Union of America, AFL-CIO International Constitution.”

Cato wrote that operators running for election needed to be in “good standing” by paying union dues for a period of 12 consecutive months, and attend at least 50 percent of membership meetings. He declined to answer any questions.

But Johnson, Logan and another operator running for office, Loree Woods-Bowman, contest they meet all the criteria. Johnson was out of work for a car accident for several months, she said, but was allowed to pay her dues once she came back to work by the union.

She showed the Examiner documentation from Cato clearing her to run for another office, as a delegate, despite the payment snafu from her car accident, which she says calls into question her disqualification for president.

Logan said the female candidates want to highlight issues for all operators, but particularly women and single mothers at Muni, who struggle under workplace rules — including a lack of bathroom breaks — that harm them in particular.

Johnson isn’t deterred by her union’s alleged discrimination.

“Women are born leaders,” she said.

Tags: TWU 250Adiscriminationwomen workersunion elections
Categories: Labor News

Colombia: Crushing The Wings Of Labor: The Air Pilot’s Strike And Colombia’s Ongoing Labor Crisis

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Huffington Post
Categories: Labor News

India: Modi govt faces working class wrath, trade unions go on strike today

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Live Mint
Categories: Labor News

UK RMT Rail workers to walk out for 48 hours this week

Current News - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 06:24

UK RMT Rail workers to walk out for 48 hours this week
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/nov/07/rail-workers-to-walk-out...
RMT members to strike on Wednesday and Thursday, with South Western Railway affected for first time
South Western Railway
South Western Railway is affected by the dispute over the future of guards on trains for the first time. Photograph: Victoria Jones/PA
Gwyn Topham
@GwynTopham
Tuesday 7 November 2017 17.55 GMT
Rail strikes over the future of guards on trains will disrupt services across the country on Wednesday and Thursday, with one of Britain’s busiest commuter franchises, South Western Railway, affected for the first time.

Members of the RMT union will walk out for 48 hours on South Western, Greater Anglia and Southern trains, while Merseyrail and Northern will see strikes only on Wednesday as a row over guards that started on the Southern route last yearripples around the UK.

Chris Grayling, the transport secretary, has accused the RMT union of lying over the reasons for the action, while Labour has informed train operators it would halt any plans to remove guards.

Writing in the Evening Standard, Grayling accused the RMT of “calling political strikes over things that aren’t actually happening”. He said: “It’s difficult not to see the threat from Sean Hoyle, president of the RMT, to have a ‘quasi-national rail strike just like 1911 all over again’ to ‘bring down this working class hating Tory government’ as the real reason for the action.”

But the RMT warned that the possibility of driver-only trains on South Western would discriminate against older and disabled passengers, with around 70% of the stations on the network left unstaffed. Mick Cash, the general secretary, said: “We have already had concerns raised with us that de-staffing trains will increase the risk of crime and antisocial behaviour.

“Now we know that 140 – or seven out of 10 – of South Western’s stations are unstaffed … Protection for disabled and older people will be ripped up as there will no longer be the guarantee of a guard and instead the profits of the company will take priority over the needs of the most vulnerable in our society.”

<4000.jpg>
UK's biggest rail franchise to be broken up
Read more
South Western, like Northern and Greater Anglia, has said it has no plans to remove guards – but the RMT says the firms will not provide guarantees, while new trains entering service could be operated by a driver alone. Southern has rebranded guards as onboard supervisors and downgraded their safety role.

Labour has written to the rail operators facing strikes this week to tell them that the party would stop plans to remove more guards from trains if it wins power. The shadow transport secretary, Andy McDonald, said in a letter that guards are “vital” for safety and to ensure accessibility for passengers who need assistance. He wrote: “I also wish to advise you that an incoming Labour government will stop plans for any future roll-out of driver-only operation across the rail industry. We will examine the full range of options to realise this objective.”

Services on South Western have been disrupted already this week due to a series of problems, including the partial derailment of a train at Wimbledon on Monday. The RMT pointed to the incident as underlining the importance of guards. Cash added: “These strikes are about rail safety and accessibility pure and simple. It was the guard on that train who safely evacuated 300 passengers in an emergency situation.”

South Western, which operates into Britain’s busiest railway station, London Waterloo, expects to run around 60% of its normal train service during the strike. It has warned passengers to expect much more crowded trains, while rail replacement buses will operate in parts of the network.

Greater Anglia and Southern are expecting to run a near-normal service, although Southern anticipates worse crowding than usual on routes near South Western stations. Merseyrail and Northern will cancel early morning and evening services, but intend to run most trains between 7am and 7pm.

Tags: RMTstrikeSouth Western Railway
Categories: Labor News

UK RMT Rail workers to walk out for 48 hours this week

Current News - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 06:24

UK RMT Rail workers to walk out for 48 hours this week
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/nov/07/rail-workers-to-walk-out...
RMT members to strike on Wednesday and Thursday, with South Western Railway affected for first time
South Western Railway
South Western Railway is affected by the dispute over the future of guards on trains for the first time. Photograph: Victoria Jones/PA
Gwyn Topham
@GwynTopham
Tuesday 7 November 2017 17.55 GMT
Rail strikes over the future of guards on trains will disrupt services across the country on Wednesday and Thursday, with one of Britain’s busiest commuter franchises, South Western Railway, affected for the first time.

Members of the RMT union will walk out for 48 hours on South Western, Greater Anglia and Southern trains, while Merseyrail and Northern will see strikes only on Wednesday as a row over guards that started on the Southern route last yearripples around the UK.

Chris Grayling, the transport secretary, has accused the RMT union of lying over the reasons for the action, while Labour has informed train operators it would halt any plans to remove guards.

Writing in the Evening Standard, Grayling accused the RMT of “calling political strikes over things that aren’t actually happening”. He said: “It’s difficult not to see the threat from Sean Hoyle, president of the RMT, to have a ‘quasi-national rail strike just like 1911 all over again’ to ‘bring down this working class hating Tory government’ as the real reason for the action.”

But the RMT warned that the possibility of driver-only trains on South Western would discriminate against older and disabled passengers, with around 70% of the stations on the network left unstaffed. Mick Cash, the general secretary, said: “We have already had concerns raised with us that de-staffing trains will increase the risk of crime and antisocial behaviour.

“Now we know that 140 – or seven out of 10 – of South Western’s stations are unstaffed … Protection for disabled and older people will be ripped up as there will no longer be the guarantee of a guard and instead the profits of the company will take priority over the needs of the most vulnerable in our society.”

<4000.jpg>
UK's biggest rail franchise to be broken up
Read more
South Western, like Northern and Greater Anglia, has said it has no plans to remove guards – but the RMT says the firms will not provide guarantees, while new trains entering service could be operated by a driver alone. Southern has rebranded guards as onboard supervisors and downgraded their safety role.

Labour has written to the rail operators facing strikes this week to tell them that the party would stop plans to remove more guards from trains if it wins power. The shadow transport secretary, Andy McDonald, said in a letter that guards are “vital” for safety and to ensure accessibility for passengers who need assistance. He wrote: “I also wish to advise you that an incoming Labour government will stop plans for any future roll-out of driver-only operation across the rail industry. We will examine the full range of options to realise this objective.”

Services on South Western have been disrupted already this week due to a series of problems, including the partial derailment of a train at Wimbledon on Monday. The RMT pointed to the incident as underlining the importance of guards. Cash added: “These strikes are about rail safety and accessibility pure and simple. It was the guard on that train who safely evacuated 300 passengers in an emergency situation.”

South Western, which operates into Britain’s busiest railway station, London Waterloo, expects to run around 60% of its normal train service during the strike. It has warned passengers to expect much more crowded trains, while rail replacement buses will operate in parts of the network.

Greater Anglia and Southern are expecting to run a near-normal service, although Southern anticipates worse crowding than usual on routes near South Western stations. Merseyrail and Northern will cancel early morning and evening services, but intend to run most trains between 7am and 7pm.

Tags: RMTstrikeSouth Western Railway
Categories: Labor News

Union Busting SF Mayor Ed Lee Helps Billionaire Owners of UBER & Lyft With Privatization Of Public Spaces

Current News - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 16:31

Union Busting SF Mayor Ed Lee Helps Billionaire Owners of UBER & Lyft With Privatization Of Public Spaces

http://www.sfexaminer.com/mayor-lee-strikes-deal-allow-uber-lyft-vehicle...

Mayor Lee strikes deal to allow Uber, Lyft vehicles to use SF curb space

In exchange for traffic data from Uber and Lyft, Mayor Ed Lee has agreed to a pilot program to convert some parking spaces into painted curbs that could be legally used by ride-hail drivers. (Aleah Fajardo/2016 Special to S.F. Examiner)
By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez on November 7, 2017 12:00 pm

Mayor Ed Lee and tech giants Uber and Lyft struck a deal this week to provide city curb space for ride-hail vehicles as part of a new pilot designed to ease San Francisco traffic, the San Francisco Examiner has learned.

In exchange for traffic data from Uber and Lyft that The City will use to combat congestion, Lee agreed to a pilot program to convert some parking spaces — in a yet-to-be determined commercial corridor — into painted curbs that could be legally used by ride-hail drivers.

That data is a holy grail sought aggressively by city leaders to help transportation planners ease local traffic, including City Attorney Dennis Herrera, who has filed with the California Public Utility Commission to obtain such data. The CPUC regulates Uber and Lyft in California.

“The City and shared mobility organizations both want the same thing for our city — a world class transportation network that is safe and efficient for everyone,” Lee wrote in a Tuesday morning email to the CEOs of Uber and Lyft, Dara Khosrowshahi and John Zimmer, respectively.

The deal follows Lee’s effort to negotiate with Uber and Lyft that began in May, which was first reported by the Examiner, to combat increasing traffic jams and safety concerns that city leaders say is exacerbated by 5-6,000 Uber and Lyft vehicles that descend on San Francisco daily, out of a pool of 45,000-plus local ride-hail drivers.

The deal struck by Lee, Uber and Lyft comes after months of negotiations behind the scenes.

In the letter to the Uber and Lyft CEOs, Lee wrote that prior to the implementation of the pilot program, ride-hail companies will electronically ban ride-hail drivers from using certain locations via the cellphone app, called geofencing.

Geofencing would help designate for drivers which painted curbs they could use to pick up passengers, Lee wrote, and the ride-hail companies will begin “in-app education” of customers and riders on the new protocol.

“To ensure compliance,” Lee wrote, “The City will require data, such as anonymized trip details, from shared mobility providers (Uber and Lyft).”

Uber said it was “excited” to collaborate with the Mayor’s Office and would share data through a third party, but did not clarify what level of data would be shared.

Notably, the company has said that it shares trip data in heat maps, which they call “Movement,” but it lacks specificity necessary to help transportation planners.

“Lyft looks forward to partnering with the Mayor’s Office” Lyft spokesperson Chelsea Wilson said in a statement. She added, “The details of the program are still being finalized, but we believe there is a way to share anonymized data that helps The City understand the current transportation environment while still protecting user privacy.”

Exactly what commercial corridor the pilot will take place in, and in which neighborhood, has not yet been determined, according to Lee’s letter.

After the agreement was announced Tuesday, Supervisor Hillary Ronen voiced her desire to find alternatives for Uber and Lyft on Valencia Street, where cyclists complain thousands of ride-hail drivers block bike lanes each day.

“I strongly urge that Valencia [Street] be selected as the corridor for this program,” Ronen told the Examiner. However, she said she does not want parking to be impacted.

Meanwhile, in a public letter Ronen sent to Uber and Lyft on Tuesday, she asked the companies to voluntarily geofence Valencia, and only pick up riders on side streets.

Data from the San Francisco County Transportation Authority shows on one average Dolores Street block on any given Friday, there are about 280 ride-hail pickups and dropoffs, the Examiner previously reported. On just one block of Valencia Street near 16th Street, by contrast, there are as many as 2,190 daily pickups and dropoffs by ride-hails like Uber and Lyft.

Though no neighborhood has been identified for Lee’s pilot with Uber and Lyft, the agreement will kick off an outreach effort with the Board of Supervisors, merchants and residents, to see who would be willing to host this ride-hail pilot.

At least one Lyft driver is a fan, with some concerns. Ken, who declined to give his last name, drove on Fulton Street as he discussed his concerns about the deal with The City.

“It depends on the location. Just like here, we don’t need a white zone, you know what I’m talking about?” he said, gesturing to Alamo Square Park

Ken, a three-year Uber driver who switched to Lyft two months ago, said it would be more useful to have white zones to pickup and drop off passengers along Market Street, for instance, or Valencia Street, where bicyclists have held human chain protests to highlight the danger of Uber and Lyft vehicles swooping into bike lanes to pick up passengers.

“I know there’s a lot of drivers on the street,” Ken said. “Traffic is getting worse and worse.”

Tags: UberLyftprivatizationpublic spaces
Categories: Labor News

Georgia: Defend Georgian trade unions

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL
Categories: Labor News

Egypt: New Draft Trade Union Law Suppresses Freedom of Association

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITUC
Categories: Labor News

Turkey: Unpaid labourers are 'slipping pleas for help into Zara clothes'

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Independent
Categories: Labor News

Georgia: Union busting continues at Rustavi Azot in Georgia

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 11/05/2017 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL
Categories: Labor News

Cambodia: Unpaid labourers are 'slipping pleas for help into Zara clothes'

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 11/05/2017 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Independent
Categories: Labor News

Kenya: Nurses End Their 5-Month Strike After Deal With State

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: allAfrica
Categories: Labor News

Nigeria: Strike: Labour suspends negotiation with Kogi Govt over murder of its leader

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Daily Post
Categories: Labor News

UK Bus Boss Fires Workers After Burning Workers Out ‘I can’t work with you a moment longer’: boss fires bus drivers with blunt note

Current News - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 06:10

UK Bus Boss Fires Workers After Burning Workers Out
‘I can’t work with you a moment longer’: boss fires bus drivers with blunt note
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/nov/01/sydney-hardy-nippybus-bo...

Staff angry after Sydney Hardy shuts down Somerset company Nippybus ‘to pursue my dream of not having to work here’
The Nippybus depot in Great Western Road, Martock.
The Nippybus depot in Great Western Road, Martock. The closure of Nippybus has affected hundreds of passengers, including more than 300 students. Photograph: SWNS.com
Shares
1123
Steven Morris and agency
@stevenmorris20
Wednesday 1 November 2017 18.00 GMTFirst published on Wednesday 1 November 2017 11.05 GMT
The boss of a Somerset bus company who took his fleet off the road without warning and sent staff a brusque and foul-mouthed note explaining he could not bear to work with them “a moment longer” has been criticised by drivers, mechanics and passengers.

Staff at Nippybus said they were out of pocket and desperately searching for new jobs to pay their bills, while hundreds of passengers, from children to pensioners, were left trying to find a way to get to school, work and the shops and to keep medical appointments.

Campaigners said the Nippybus situation highlighted problems faced by under-pressure bus services, especially in very rural areas, across the UK.

Guardian Today: the headlines, the analysis, the debate - sent direct to you
Read more
In an internal memo to staff, Sydney Hardy, 57, explained in no uncertain terms he was “getting off” after 13 years in charge of Nippybus, which is based in the village of Martock, near Yeovil.

He wrote: “There is a difference between giving up and knowing when you have had enough. I have had enough and realise I cannot work with you, the people I employ, a moment longer.

“There comes a time in any relationship when you just have to say ‘Fuck it’, say goodbye and move on. This is my time! I am quitting to pursue my dream of not having to work here.”

Hardy added: “The gates are now closed and will not open so you can stay in your scratchers and have a lie in.”

MD Syd Hardy
MD Syd Hardy
The gates were indeed closed on Wednesday and Hardy was not available for further comment. A security guard was posted at the fence and fetched possessions for employees who arrived from time to time. Some were also handed payslips – though they said no money had gone into their banks.

Driver Terry Lehmann said he was “gobsmacked” when he went on the company’s site to check the rota and came across Hardy’s note. “How can a human being do that to his colleagues? It’s disgusting,” he said.

Another driver, Steve Atkins, said staff were “in total shock”, adding: “Everybody’s got mortgages and bills to pay. I’ve had to ring up and cancel all my direct debits. There’s no way I can cover them.”

Dave English, who was a driver at Nippybus for almost nine years, claimed the company was struggling because it had been losing drivers. “Everyone was doing long shifts, but he [Hardy] just expected us to do them. The memo makes out that it’s the drivers’ fault this has happened, but without us he would never have had his company.”

The county council has been working hard to find replacement buses for the routes, including school runs, that were covered by Nippybus.

Martock councillor Neil Bloomfield said many people in the area relied heavily on the buses to get to work and to the shops. “We have a high proportion of people who don’t have cars. They are very isolated without buses.”

Bloomfield said there was a shortage of drivers in Somerset partly because many were working on the Hinkley Point nuclear power plant project. “It is a worry for people here,” he said.

Rail workers on five networks to strike over driver-only trains
Read more
Lianna Etkind, public transport campaigner at the Campaign for Better Transport, said: “Buses are the lifeblood of local communities and economies, and play a major part in reducing road congestion and air pollution as well. Unfortunately, we are hearing more and more of small bus companies ceasing operations without any warning, leaving staff without jobs and passengers without a means to get to work or school.”

People from Martock shared their tales of misery caused by the demise of Nippybus. Marie Bennett, who works at Claire’s cafe next to the bus yard, said her 16-year-old daughter, Kaitlyn, was forced to go to college on the back of a motorbike. “I wasn’t so happy with that,” she said. Her boss, Claire Lambert, said the loss of the company would have a knock-on effect on other businesses in the village.

A temporary bus service has been running between Yeovil and the village. Jon Tucker, who has relied on the buses since losing a leg in a road accident, said he and his family would struggle without a regular, reliable service.

“I go to the gym in Yeovil three times a week to help improve my mobility and take the children into town to the cinema and bowling at the weekend. We need a good service.”

Retired power company worker Barry Fry said many elderly people would be lost without buses. “There are lots of vulnerable people who rely on that bus.

“We don’t know what is going on at the moment, which is very concerning. It’s disgraceful that the company has acted like this.”

Tags: UK bus workersoverworkstress
Categories: Labor News

Australia: AWU raid: something is deeply wrong with how unions are treated in Australia

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Morning Herald
Categories: Labor News

Global: Take action against Apple’s labour abuse now

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Good Electronic
Categories: Labor News

Pages

Subscribe to Transport Workers Solidarity Committee aggregator