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"Miners Shot Down" Screening In San Francisco

Current News - Fri, 07/04/2014 - 08:52

"Miners Shot Down" Screening In San Francisco

Police massacre of 34 striking Marikana miners
Saturday, July 5, 7:00 PM

ILWU 34, Ship Clerks Union
801 2nd St., SF next to AT&T Stadium LaborFest film showing
“Miners Shot Down”
http://www.laborfest.net/2014/2014schedule.htm#9

Sunday, July 6, 2:00 PM

ILWU 10, Longshore Union
400 N. Point St./Mason, SF Special meeting with
NUMSA representative by Skype

“Bloody Thursday” July 5 commemorates the police murder of maritime workers in the 1934 Big Strike which provoked the San Francisco General Strike. All U.S. West Coast ports are shutdown to honor the 6 labor martyrs killed during the strike.

In 2012, at the Marikana mine in South Africa, 34 striking miners were massacred by police. ILWU Local 10 sent a letter of protest to the ANC-led government. a representative of (NUMSA), the largest union in that country will address workers by skip about the massacre and miners strike, the longest in South African history and the national metalworkers’ strike.

On July 1, both the South African metalworkers union and the ILWU longshore contracts expire. NUM- SA is preparing for a “full-blown strike” much like the maritime workers did in 1934. Now is the time for international labor solidarity.

Tags: NUMSAilwuBloody Thursday
Categories: Labor News

CA State court rules that fired Paratransit driver cannot be denied unemployment benefits

Current News - Fri, 07/04/2014 - 08:48

CA State court rules that fired Paratransit driver cannot be denied unemployment benefits
http://www.sacbee.com/2014/07/03/6533061/state-court-rules-that-fired-pa...
By Denny Walsh
dwalsh@sacbee.com
Published: Thursday, Jul. 3, 2014 - 11:00 pm
In a victory with broad implications for the state’s army of unemployed, the California Supreme Court ruled Thursday thatunemployment benefits for a Sacramento Paratransit driver cannot be denied because he was fired for refusing to sign a formal notification of discipline.

“Even assuming (Paratransit’s) order to sign the disciplinary notice was reasonable and lawful, and even assuming (Craig Medeiros’) refusal to do so may have justified his termination ... the ... issue here is whether the ... facts, which are undisputed, establish that he committed misconduct within the meaning of” a state statute, the court said. “We conclude the answer is no,” it declared.

The unanimous opinion was authored by Justice Marvin R. Baxter.

After a passenger filed a complaint against Medeiros in 2008 alleging he harassed her and Paratransit decided the claim was well founded, he defied repeated orders to sign a memorandum that he was being disciplined for the incident, including two days on suspension without pay.

Medeiros said he disputed the factual scenario depicted in the document, he believed he had the right to consult with a union representative before deciding whether to sign it, and he was concerned he would be admitting wrongdoing.

Paratransit officials warned Medeiros that, if he did not sign the notice, it would be a violation of the company’s collective bargaining agreement with the union and would be viewed as insubordination and grounds for termination.

But Medeiros would not accept the company’s assurances that his signature would not be an admission of guilt but would only acknowledge receipt of the notice.

So, in May 2008, after six years with Paratransit, Medeiros was fired.

Paratransit Inc., is a private nonprofit corporation providing transportation to disabled and elderly people and related agencies throughout the Sacramento region.

In the years of legal wrangling that followed Medeiros’ firing, his lawyers did not question the legitimacy of his termination, but they challenged findings by trial and appellate courts that he is not entitled to unemployment benefits because he was fired for misconduct.

California law bars unemployment benefits for someone fired for misconduct, as the law defines that term, and Paratransit says that is the reason Medeiros was discharged.

But the Supreme Court, reversing decisions in the two lower courts, ruled that his refusal to sign the notice does not fall under the rubric of misconduct, “but was, at most, a good faith error in judgment that does not disqualify him from unemployment benefits.”

Carole Vigne, a staff attorney at the Legal Aid Society-Employment Law Center in San Francisco,described the ruling as “important on multiple levels.”

Vigne, who filed a brief with the Supreme Court in support of Medeiros, said it is the court’s “first substantive decision interpreting the Unemployment Insurance Code that we’ve had in 30 years. It is a very clear affirmation that the code is intended to relieve hardship and cannot be vitiated by a one-time incident of disobedience.”

She said the decision “is certainly timely, given the huge unemployment numbers we’ve had in recent years. Unemployment insurance is a safety net and lifeline for so many people, especially low-wage workers, and now there is no doubt they do not forfeit that protection when they lose a job through no fault of their own by disobeying what even might have been a reasonable and lawful order.”

Paratransit attorney Laura McHugh takes strong exception to that view and to the high court’s conclusion.

Thursday’s opinion “is result-oriented and inconsistent with the purpose of unemployment benefits, which are meant to help people who have lost their jobs through no fault of their own,” McHugh said.

“Mr. Medeiros had an option,” she said. “He could have signed off on the suspension, continued to work and grieved it through the union. So, it was his own fault that he wasn’t employed.

“But wait, now we’re told it was not his fault. So he gets unemployment.

“This allows employees to refuse to comply with reasonable and lawful directives from their employers,” McHugh said. “It makes it easier for them to come up with excuses why they don’t have to do what they are told. It is disappointing that our courts here in California continue to gravitate toward these types of positions.”

Stacey Leyton, an attorney who filed a brief with the Supreme Court in support of Medeiros on behalf of United Steelworkers, said the “general legal principles regarding honest-mistake termination” were established in earlier California case law, but the factual scenario in Medeiros had not before been addressed.

She said the Supreme Court’s ruling “is tremendously important. The lower courts were out of sync with the law and the purpose of unemployment insurance.”

“This is common,” Leyton said of the situation Medeiros claims he found himself in. “It happens to a lot of people. It is not at all unusual for someone to believe they are admitting wrongdoing if he or she signs such a document.

“But now we have a definitive answer: Even if they can be fired for not signing, they can’t lose their right to unemployment benefits.”

Call The Bee’s Denny Walsh, (916) 321-1189.

• Read more articles by Denny Walsh

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/2014/07/03/6533061/state-court-rules-that-fired-pa...

Tags: Para-transit driversunemployment
Categories: Labor News

“Stop Oil by Rail” Call to Action, July 6-13

Railroaded's Blog - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 19:14

“Keep the oil off the rails and in the ground.”

That’s the message for the week of action across North America starting July 6 to commemorate the 47 people who were killed in Lac-Mégantic by the oil train that derailed July 6, 2013, spilling 6 million litres of oil into the environment, exploding and burning for days, and destroying much of downtown Lac-Mégantic, Quebec. The town has still not recovered from one of the worst rail disasters in history.

The one-week commemoration event is spearheaded by Oil Change International, 350.org, Forest Ethics and the Sierra Club (see this link). The campaign states, “Lac-Mégantic’s struggle is a grim reminder to us all: Big oil will stop at nothing to extract, transport, and burn every drop of oil in the ground. No matter the risk, no matter the cost to public health, safety, and the climate, the oil industry will jump at every opportunity to profit. But now is the time when we say NO MORE. No more exploding trains. No more tar sands. No more reckless endangerment of our communities and our climate.”

Despite the Lac-Mégantic disaster and many other oil train derailments, spills, explosions and fires, the oil and rail industries are forging ahead with grandiose plans to expand oil-by-rail in Canada and the United States. Read “Runaway Train: The Reckless Expansion of Crude-by-Rail in North America” for details of the oil and rail industries’ current and planned shipments of crude-by-rail. The report, recently prepared by Oil Change International, suggests there may be a 5-fold increase in oil train traffic in North America, threatening communities, lakes, rivers and streams, with 675 trains of 100 tank cars each carrying a total of 45 million barrels of oil through North American communities every day.

Le Carré Bleu Lac-Mégantic, a local citizen group in Lac-Mégantic, has been calling for greater transparency in the rebuilding of their town following the oil train derailment nearly a year ago. They want the rail line through the centre of downtown to be rerouted around the town. Many residents don’t want any oil train traffic whatsoever near their town.

How many more oil train disasters like the one at Lac-Mégantic will it take to convince the oil and rail industries and federal politicians in Canada and the U.S. that oil and other hazardous goods cannot be transported safely by rail?

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Filed under: Derailment, shipping oil by rail, Spills
Categories: Labor News

Reckless Expansion of Crude-by-Rail in North America

Railroaded's Blog - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 15:53

Oil Change International has recently released a 30-page report titled, “Runaway Train: The Reckless Expansion of Crude-by-Rail in North America”.

As quoted from the May 2014 report, “This report has detailed the reckless growth of the crude-by-rail trade in North America and described where and how this trade is operating, as well as future plans for the industry. For the past five years, the oil industry has charged forward with this mode of transport without any regard for the safety of the communities it passes through. While the most recent figures for actual crude-by-rail shipments suggests that some one million bpd of crude oil is loaded and unloaded to and from trains every day in North America, the capacity of the system is already over three times that, and could grow to over five times today’s traffic. This threatens thousands of communities across North America with the specter of exploding trains and spilling oil”

A few of the report’s key findings are:

1. 188 terminals in Canada and the U.S. are actively loading and unloading crude oil onto and off trains.

2. Roughly 135 crude oil trains with 100 tank cars each are moving every day through North America which means, at any given time, there are about 9 million barrels of oil moving through North America.

3. If all current and planned operations were utilized to full capacity, 675 trains with 100 cars each would be carrying about 45 million barrels of oil through North America every day.

The report concludes, “Citizens and local governments across North America are taking action to oppose crude trains passing through their communities and to fight against new or expanded terminals in their midst. Further action is needed to ensure that regulators put the safety of communities above profits for the oil and rail industries. Communities need to organize to stop this runaway train in its tracks. This report and the online map that accompanies it seek to assist that process by providing data on what the crude-by-rail industry is doing, where it is operating, and what it has planned.”

This report is a “must-read” for anyone who lives near rail lines and anyone who is concerned about trains, often referred to as “Bomb Trains”, carrying hazardous crude oil through our communities and along our rivers, streams and lakes. Oil Change International will be following up with additional reports in the future that will consider: the economics of crude-by-rail, safety, and climate change issues. See this link for more information from Oil Change International. Railroaded has reported many times in the past on the hazards of shipping oil by rail – see this link.


Filed under: Safety, shipping oil by rail, Spills
Categories: Labor News

Review Board Charges Pat Flynn with Embezzlement

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 11:38

July 3, 2014: Chicago Local 710 secretary treasurer Pat Flynn has been charged by the Independent Review Board (IRB) with embezzling $58,000 in visa gift cards, violating his fiduciary duty, and exposing the local to legal liability in a cover-up.

Flynn was paid $482,543 by Local 710 members’ dues in 2013, plus an additional $44,900 in deferred income, making him the highest paid of all Teamster’ fat cats.

The 105-page investigative report and recommended charges indicates that the IRB has thoroughly investigated what happened with the gift cards during the years 2009-2012. 

Each year Local 710 staff would provide a number of stewards with $150 gift cards.  Flynn, the local secretary treasurer, would then direct the staff to purchase excess cards that were kept by him personally in his office, separate from other union property and money. The same thing happened with $25 gift cards purchased as prizes for union meeting attendance. The excess cards were not accounted for and were not shown as assets on the LM-2 or the monthly trustees’ reports, although the visa cards were as good as cash.

The report notes that Flynn’s various explanations for the scheme are not credible. “Flynn essentially claimed that since local funds had been converted into gift cards solely under his control, at that point magically he did not have to account for their use.”  (pp 79-80)

The IRB points out that Flynn served as the local secretary treasurer since 2004, was an employee of the local for 33 years, had served on Hoffa’s General Executive Board, and studied accounting in college, so his claimed ignorance does not stand.

IRB procedures call for Hoffa to bring charges against Flynn, hold a hearing, and report the results to the IRB within 90 days, or decline to act. At that point the IRB will take over and make the final determination on the adequacy of actions taken.

The IRB exists to investigate and root out corruption in the Teamsters Union. Of the three members on the board one is chosen by Hoffa and the General Executive Board, one by the US Attorney, and one selected jointly by both. 

Issues: Local Union Reform
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Brazilian Sao Paulo Transit Workers Buck Union Officials to Strike

Current News - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 11:37

Brazilian Sao Paulo Transit Workers Buck Union Officials to Strike
http://labornotes.org/2014/06/brazilian-workers-buck-union-officials-str...

June 23, 2014 / Claudia Costaenlarge or shrink textlogin or register to comment
76 61

Demonstrators welcomed the World Cup to Brazil June 12. Many recent strikes have been called by the rank and file. Photo: Samia Gabriela Teixeira.

The World Cup is in full swing, and official propaganda from President Dilma Roussef’s administration portrays Brazil as a wonderland. But Brazilians have been exposing the truth in a full year of demonstrations, protests, and strikes.

The massive public spending on the World Cup has thrown into contrast the poor pay, high fares, and starved public services Brazilians endure. And the construction has driven up housing costs and displaced poor workers.

Protests began last summer when two million people, mainly youth, filled the streets of several cities. The demonstrations kicked off protesting transit fare hikes and spread to include causes such as an end to official corruption.

Worker mobilizations took the national stage in 2014.

In January, a 10-day bus drivers strike brought the city of Porto Alegre to a halt. The strike wasn’t led by union officials—the union is conservative—but by the opposition union caucus backed by Bloco de Lutas (Fighting Bloc).

This first bus strike triggered others in Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Fortaleza, and Sao Paulo, plunging traffic into chaos in these major cities.

Janitors who clean the streets in Rio de Janeiro also struck during Carnival, leaving the city a mess. In spite of that, most people supported the janitors against the mayor, who was refusing to increase their wages.

“The mayor says that our movement is a riot, but a riot is an uprising of prisoners,” one of their leaders declared to the mainstream newspaper O Globo. “Here is an action of workers, unless the mayor believes that janitors are thugs.”

The janitors’ rebellion started because the mayor and union officials had agreed on what workers thought was a too-small wage increase: 10 percent (Brazil faces 6.37 percent inflation this year). Like the bus strike, this was led by an opposition caucus. It ended with janitors winning a 37 percent increase.

Solidarity Requested for Fired Metro Workers

The São Paulo metro workers union is calling for international support as it campaigs for the rehire of all 42 workers fired after the June 5-9 strike.

“All solidarity will be warmly welcomed,” writes President Altino de Melo Prazeres, including supportive resolutions, photos of supporters holding a poster, delegations to Brazilian diplomatic representatives, and donations of funds to help the 42 fired workers make ends meet.

Contributions may be sent to the union’s bank account: Banco do Brasil, Agência: 6.821-7, Conta corrente: 373-5.

Messages of support should go to the union at sindicato@metroviarios-sp.org.br and the CSP-Conlutas federation at secretaria@cspconlutas.org.br.

Visit the union’s web site to learn more.

Wildcats, Everywhere

Another wildcat strike, by the 22,000 workers at the Petrochemical Complex (Comperj) in Rio de Janeiro, lasted 40 days. They got a 9 percent increase plus some other benefits.

In the end, a fired member of the safety commission said, “Even dismissed with no rights, I feel proud to have carried out this struggle, as today I feel myself [to be] a real human being.”

Construction workers too carried out many strikes in 2013 and 2014, though these also were not supported by their unions. Eleven workers have lost their lives building or renovating football stadiums.

It’s notable that many strikes are being organized from below, without the approval of union leaders. Activists are seeking alternatives to pro-government unions and federations.

CSP-Conlutas, a militant federation formed by unions and activists who broke away from Brazil’s largest labor federation, the CUT, is becoming a pole of attraction for this new generation of labor activists.

“Without support from their unions, they look to us or any of the unions affiliated to CSP-Conlutas to provide infrastructure for their struggles,” says Atnágoras Lopes, a construction worker who is one of the federation’s leaders.

Labor sociologist Ruy Braga, at the University of Sao Paulo, links this new labor movement to the increase in casual and outsourced workers, underpaid and working in degraded conditions. They’re the ones who are “rising against union officials and their compromising spirit,” he explained to alternative newspaper Correio da Cidadania. Casual and outsourced workers in Brazil may have unions, but often don’t share the same union or the same contract as regular workers.

‘Who Is the Man who Threatens the World Cup?’

Union officials have led some strikes, including those of public university employees, and workers in the Ministry of Culture and in the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics.

The most important was the Sao Paulo metro workers strike June 5, the anniversary of the 2013 demonstrations about fare increases, and shortly before the start of the World Cup. The union was defending the right of public transit and demanding a 12.2 percent pay increase.

Nearly all workers crossed their arms for five days, and rallied with community members raising banners reading “Transport is not a commodity.” The union offered to suspend the strike if the metro were made free.

A court ordered them back to work, but they refused. Only supervisors kept working and managed to open some metro stations. Despite the disruption to the transportation system, 77 percent of the population supported the strike, according to a survey carried out by a mainstream TV channel.

The governor of Sao Paulo sent the riot police into metro stations to beat and arrest striking workers. Courts sided with the governor and declared the strike “abusive.” Then 42 workers were fired. The union is campaigning to reinstate them, and the strike is suspended as of this writing. (See box.)

The Sao Paolo metro strike got international attention and support. The mainstream newspaper O Estado de Sao Paulo published a profile of Altino Prazeres, the union president, with the headline, “Who is the man who threatens the World Cup?”

More Popular Protests

On top of labor struggles, there are community and student mobilizations to protest exorbitant World Cup expenditures. They’re motivated by dissatisfaction with corporate privileges and low-quality public services. Dilma Roussef’s administration is their main target.

Interestingly, these mobilizations have no presence from traditional organizations like the CUT, the landless movement, or the national students’ association. Even the homeless movement, which had been occupying an area next to a $400 million stadium in Sao Paulo, compromised with Roussef’s administration in exchange for the building of 2,000 housing units.

Instead, the protests are led by new formations, such as Na Copa vai ter luta (There will be struggles during the world cup), Não vai ter Copa (There will be no World Cup) and ¿Copa para quem? (Who is the World Cup for?).

There’s no sign this struggling mood will stop after the World Cup. On the contrary, there are many opportunities for contract campaigns in traditional sectors—metal, oil, and bank workers—to link up with popular, youth, and non-union labor struggles.

Claudia Costa is a journalist at CSP-Conlutas and teaches postgraduate courses in Social Communication at Metropolitan College United (FMU) in Sao Paulo. She also worked as an intern at Labor Notes.

- See more at: http://labornotes.org/2014/06/brazilian-workers-buck-union-officials-str...

Tags: Sao Paulo Transit Workers
Categories: Labor News

Brazilian Sao Paulo Transit Workers Buck Union Officials to Strike

Current News - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 11:37

Brazilian Sao Paulo Transit Workers Buck Union Officials to Strike
http://labornotes.org/2014/06/brazilian-workers-buck-union-officials-str...

June 23, 2014 / Claudia Costaenlarge or shrink textlogin or register to comment
76 61

Demonstrators welcomed the World Cup to Brazil June 12. Many recent strikes have been called by the rank and file. Photo: Samia Gabriela Teixeira.

The World Cup is in full swing, and official propaganda from President Dilma Roussef’s administration portrays Brazil as a wonderland. But Brazilians have been exposing the truth in a full year of demonstrations, protests, and strikes.

The massive public spending on the World Cup has thrown into contrast the poor pay, high fares, and starved public services Brazilians endure. And the construction has driven up housing costs and displaced poor workers.

Protests began last summer when two million people, mainly youth, filled the streets of several cities. The demonstrations kicked off protesting transit fare hikes and spread to include causes such as an end to official corruption.

Worker mobilizations took the national stage in 2014.

In January, a 10-day bus drivers strike brought the city of Porto Alegre to a halt. The strike wasn’t led by union officials—the union is conservative—but by the opposition union caucus backed by Bloco de Lutas (Fighting Bloc).

This first bus strike triggered others in Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Fortaleza, and Sao Paulo, plunging traffic into chaos in these major cities.

Janitors who clean the streets in Rio de Janeiro also struck during Carnival, leaving the city a mess. In spite of that, most people supported the janitors against the mayor, who was refusing to increase their wages.

“The mayor says that our movement is a riot, but a riot is an uprising of prisoners,” one of their leaders declared to the mainstream newspaper O Globo. “Here is an action of workers, unless the mayor believes that janitors are thugs.”

The janitors’ rebellion started because the mayor and union officials had agreed on what workers thought was a too-small wage increase: 10 percent (Brazil faces 6.37 percent inflation this year). Like the bus strike, this was led by an opposition caucus. It ended with janitors winning a 37 percent increase.

Solidarity Requested for Fired Metro Workers

The São Paulo metro workers union is calling for international support as it campaigs for the rehire of all 42 workers fired after the June 5-9 strike.

“All solidarity will be warmly welcomed,” writes President Altino de Melo Prazeres, including supportive resolutions, photos of supporters holding a poster, delegations to Brazilian diplomatic representatives, and donations of funds to help the 42 fired workers make ends meet.

Contributions may be sent to the union’s bank account: Banco do Brasil, Agência: 6.821-7, Conta corrente: 373-5.

Messages of support should go to the union at sindicato@metroviarios-sp.org.br and the CSP-Conlutas federation at secretaria@cspconlutas.org.br.

Visit the union’s web site to learn more.

Wildcats, Everywhere

Another wildcat strike, by the 22,000 workers at the Petrochemical Complex (Comperj) in Rio de Janeiro, lasted 40 days. They got a 9 percent increase plus some other benefits.

In the end, a fired member of the safety commission said, “Even dismissed with no rights, I feel proud to have carried out this struggle, as today I feel myself [to be] a real human being.”

Construction workers too carried out many strikes in 2013 and 2014, though these also were not supported by their unions. Eleven workers have lost their lives building or renovating football stadiums.

It’s notable that many strikes are being organized from below, without the approval of union leaders. Activists are seeking alternatives to pro-government unions and federations.

CSP-Conlutas, a militant federation formed by unions and activists who broke away from Brazil’s largest labor federation, the CUT, is becoming a pole of attraction for this new generation of labor activists.

“Without support from their unions, they look to us or any of the unions affiliated to CSP-Conlutas to provide infrastructure for their struggles,” says Atnágoras Lopes, a construction worker who is one of the federation’s leaders.

Labor sociologist Ruy Braga, at the University of Sao Paulo, links this new labor movement to the increase in casual and outsourced workers, underpaid and working in degraded conditions. They’re the ones who are “rising against union officials and their compromising spirit,” he explained to alternative newspaper Correio da Cidadania. Casual and outsourced workers in Brazil may have unions, but often don’t share the same union or the same contract as regular workers.

‘Who Is the Man who Threatens the World Cup?’

Union officials have led some strikes, including those of public university employees, and workers in the Ministry of Culture and in the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics.

The most important was the Sao Paulo metro workers strike June 5, the anniversary of the 2013 demonstrations about fare increases, and shortly before the start of the World Cup. The union was defending the right of public transit and demanding a 12.2 percent pay increase.

Nearly all workers crossed their arms for five days, and rallied with community members raising banners reading “Transport is not a commodity.” The union offered to suspend the strike if the metro were made free.

A court ordered them back to work, but they refused. Only supervisors kept working and managed to open some metro stations. Despite the disruption to the transportation system, 77 percent of the population supported the strike, according to a survey carried out by a mainstream TV channel.

The governor of Sao Paulo sent the riot police into metro stations to beat and arrest striking workers. Courts sided with the governor and declared the strike “abusive.” Then 42 workers were fired. The union is campaigning to reinstate them, and the strike is suspended as of this writing. (See box.)

The Sao Paolo metro strike got international attention and support. The mainstream newspaper O Estado de Sao Paulo published a profile of Altino Prazeres, the union president, with the headline, “Who is the man who threatens the World Cup?”

More Popular Protests

On top of labor struggles, there are community and student mobilizations to protest exorbitant World Cup expenditures. They’re motivated by dissatisfaction with corporate privileges and low-quality public services. Dilma Roussef’s administration is their main target.

Interestingly, these mobilizations have no presence from traditional organizations like the CUT, the landless movement, or the national students’ association. Even the homeless movement, which had been occupying an area next to a $400 million stadium in Sao Paulo, compromised with Roussef’s administration in exchange for the building of 2,000 housing units.

Instead, the protests are led by new formations, such as Na Copa vai ter luta (There will be struggles during the world cup), Não vai ter Copa (There will be no World Cup) and ¿Copa para quem? (Who is the World Cup for?).

There’s no sign this struggling mood will stop after the World Cup. On the contrary, there are many opportunities for contract campaigns in traditional sectors—metal, oil, and bank workers—to link up with popular, youth, and non-union labor struggles.

Claudia Costa is a journalist at CSP-Conlutas and teaches postgraduate courses in Social Communication at Metropolitan College United (FMU) in Sao Paulo. She also worked as an intern at Labor Notes.

- See more at: http://labornotes.org/2014/06/brazilian-workers-buck-union-officials-str...

Tags: Sao Paulo Transit Workers
Categories: Labor News

Industrial Worker - Issue #1767, July/August 2014

IWW - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 10:16

Headlines:

  • Work To Rule: Organizing The One Big Union At Starbucks
  • Boston Wobblies Defend Harvard Workers And Local Bus Drivers
  • Kentucky GMB Officially Chartered!

Features:

  • History Of The IWW In Grand Rapids, Michigan
  • The Disunited Food & Commercial Workers
  • France: The Long Strike At La Poste

Download a Free PDF of this issue.

read more

Categories: Unions

2nd Baldwin Community Meeting, Wed July 9th

Pittsburghers for Public Transit - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 08:22
The Baldwin campaign to restore service is really moving!


On June 27th, 4 Baldwin residents spoke at the Port Authority board meeting about the need for transit service. Additional residents were present to show their support. Board Chair Bob Hurley acknowledged that he had received many letters. See Trib article here.
A delegation of residents met with Port Authority staff on June 30th. The residents shared their concerns and asked questions about when and how service could be restored. The staff assured the delegation that they would consider their request and remain in conversation with residents, but they were unable to promise any restoration of service at this point.

Please join us for the next community meeting to get more updates on the current campaign and to discuss next steps:
Wed July 9th, 7 pmBaldwin Borough building auditorium3344 Churchview Ave
Click here for a flier and please share with your neighbors!


Categories: Labor News

Former Teamsters leader accused of embezzlement

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 06:54
Chris KenningThe Courier JournalJuly 3, 2014View the original piece

Former Louisville Teamsters leader Jerry T. Vincent Jr. was indicted Tuesday by a federal grand jury on charges that he embezzled union funds, took illegal union loans and conducted false record keeping, according to the U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Kentucky.

According to the indictment, Vincent, president of Teamsters Local 783 from 2006 to 2011, embezzled more than $17,000 between October 2009 and August 2011.

Click here to read more at The Courier Journal.

Issues: Local Union Reform
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Kuwait: Government worker strike enters 5th week, longest industrial dispute in Kuwaiti history

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 07/02/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Middle East Eye
Categories: Labor News

Philippines: Global Day of Action for 24 dismissed workers of NXP Philippines

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 07/02/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Good Electronics
Categories: Labor News

USA: Supreme Court Sides with Radical Right in Home Care Worker Case

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: AFL-CIO
Categories: Labor News

Spain: Unions launch campaign against 'criminalisation' of strikes

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Guardian
Categories: Labor News

South Africa: Massive NUMSA strike begins as 220,000 down tools

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL Global Union
Categories: Labor News

Greece: Electricity workers plan anti-privatisation strikes from Wednesday

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Reuters
Categories: Labor News

Europe: Crisis talks? Unions plan to take on Amazon

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: MSNBC
Categories: Labor News

PMA and ILWU Continue Talks on a New Labor Agreement as the Existing Contract Expires

ILWU - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 16:43

SAN FRANCISCO (July 1, 2014) – Negotiations for a new labor contract covering nearly 20,000 dockworkers at 29 West Coast ports will continue to move forward as the existing, six-year coast-wide labor agreement expires today at 5 p.m. PST.

While there will be no contract extension, cargo will keep moving, and normal operations will continue at the ports until an agreement can be reached between the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) and the International Longshore & Warehouse Union (ILWU).

Both sides understand the strategic importance of the ports to the local, regional and US economies, and are mindful of the need to finalize a new coast-wide contract as soon as possible to ensure continuing confidence in the West Coast ports and avoid any disruption to the jobs and commerce they support.

The coast-wide labor contract is between employers who operate port terminals and shipping lines represented by the PMA and dockworkers represented by the ILWU. The parties have negotiated a West Coast collective bargaining agreement since the 1930s.

 Download a PDF of the joint press release here.

Categories: Unions

Insurer Warns Some Pooled Pensions Are Beyond Recovery

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Tue, 07/01/2014 - 08:55
Mary Williams WalshThe New York TimesJuly 1, 2014View the original piece

More than a million people risk losing their federally insured pensions in just a few years despite recent stock market gains and a strengthening economy, a new government study said on Monday.

The people at risk have earned pensions in multiemployer plans, in which many companies band together with a union to provide benefits under collective bargaining. Such pensions were long considered exceptionally safe, but the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation reported in its study that some plans are now in their death throes and cannot recover.

Click here to read more at The New York Times.

Issues: Pension and Benefits
Categories: Labor News, Unions

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