Feed aggregator

Golden Gate Bridge Workers To Hold One Day Strike Next Friday

Current News - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 09:24

Golden Gate Bridge Workers To Hold One Day Strike Next Friday
http://sfappeal.com/2014/10/golden-gate-bridge-workers-to-hold-one-day-s...
BROTHERHOOD OF TEAMSTERS LOCAL 856 AND 665 GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE HIGHWAY AND TRANSPORTATION DISTRICT STRIKE by Bay City News |October 9, 2014 6:18 pm

A group of Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District workers comprised of mechanics, servicers and dispatchers announced plans this afternoon to go on a one-day strike over contract negotiations next Friday that will stop bus service between the North Bay and San Francisco.

Employees of the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District and their supporters gathered near St. Francis Yacht Club in San Francisco near the Golden Gate Bridge this afternoon to announce their decision to hold a one-day strike next week.

The strike is the third by members of the Golden Gate Bridge Labor Coalition. A union of machinists held a strike on Sept. 16 that did not affect transit service and ferryboat captains held a strike on Sept. 26 that halted ferry service that day.

Tim Jenkins, a labor representative of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 856, said the District’s bus workers, servicers, mechanics and dispatchers work hard and fear that the new contract proposed by the District will deprive them of quality, affordable health insurance.

Jenkins said that the District is trying to push workers into paying into high deductible health insurance plans.

According to Jenkins, the proposed health insurance coverage in the new contract would cause employees to stay “one car accident away from bankruptcy.”

Doug Michener, a dispatcher employed by the District for the past five years, said today that he would be directly impacted by an increase in the cost of workers’ health insurance plans.

Michener, a Novato resident, said that he currently pays about 10 percent of his medical costs out of pocket, while the District pays 90 percent.

Under the proposed contract, which would begin July 1, 2017, his out of pocket expense would be about 40 percent with the District paying the other 60 percent of the cost.

He said the District is trying to pressure workers to opt in to a high-deductible plan or it will raise workers’ premiums by at least double their current rates.

Michener said that a lot of his friends depend on the bus to get around and that a strike is the last thing he wants to see happen.

“Just like everyone else, we’re trying to have affordable healthcare,” Michener said.

Lisa Maldonado, executive director of the North Bay Labor Council, stood with the workers this afternoon and offered her support.

She said blue-collar workers are already worried about their finances and that employers who suggest raising healthcare costs for employees need “to stop aggressively taking away from workers.”

Golden Gate Bridge Labor Coalition co-chair Alex Tonisson, representing 13 unions totaling about 450 bridge, bus and ferry workers, said the strike would begin at about 3 a.m. on Oct. 17 and remain in place for the remainder of that day.

He said bus drivers have promised to honor the picket lines, and that while all union members will stand in solidarity, the strike is not expected to impact ferry or bridge service.

Tonisson said that the high-deductible, or Bronze health care plan under Covered California, is a “death-spiral” that sets up workers to pay less now but far more after 2018.

In 2018, under the Affordable Care Act, a 40 percent excise tax will be imposed on employer-sponsored plans over $10,200, Tonisson said.

The proposed contract would be “gutting” the workers’ health care plans, Tonisson said.

Bridge district spokeswoman Priya Clemens said the District’s contribution of more than 95 percent of its’ employees’ health care benefits package, “is significantly more generous than most public agencies in the Bay Area.”

Clemens said that the District doesn’t want any more strikes and has reached out to state mediation services to request help in negotiating a contract, but she said that the coalition has refused to engage in mediation.

The announcement of the strike comes after machinists and ferryboat captains each staged one-day strikes last month.

The issues that have been standing in the way of resolving the contract dispute between the bridge district and the 13-union coalition vary from union to union but cover issues such as wages, compensation for training and the proposed high-deductible health care insurance plan, among others.

“The coalition as a whole is having problems with the district,” Tonisson said.

He said the district has projected surplus revenue of roughly $138 million over the next five years.

Clemens, however, said the district’s five-year revenue projection “is actually a deficit, not a surplus. It’s a deficit of $33 million.”

The strike comes is the latest labor action by the Coalition of union workers in contract dispute with the bridge district that has left employees without a contract since July 1.

Hannah Albarazi, Bay City News

Tags: atugolden gate bridge
Categories: Labor News

Zionist Organization of America head calls for arrest of Block the Boat protesters

Current News - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 00:27

Zionist Organization of America head calls for arrest of Block the Boat protesters
http://electronicintifada.net/blogs/charlotte-silver/zionist-organizatio...
Submitted by Charlotte Silver on Wed, 10/08/2014 - 22:36
141008-block-boat.jpg

Activists have repeatedly prevented Israeli shipping vessels from unloading their cargo in US ports since August. (Daniel Arauz/Flickr)
Activists preventing the unloading of Israeli cargo ships at the Oakland Port in protest of violations of Palestinian rights have drawn the ire of Israel advocacy groups.

Last week, Morton Klein, president of the Zionist Organization of America, wrote a letter to the chief of the Oakland Police Department, Sean Whent, chastizing his department for failing to “intervene and ensure that the Zim ship could unload its cargo.”

“Anti-Semitic protesters have been blocking vessels owned by Zim Integrated Shipping Ltd., an Israel-based shipping company, from docking at the Port of Oakland, and preventing dockworkers from unloading the cargo,” Klein complains in his letter. “This problem occurred for several days in August and it occurred again last week.”

Klein’s letter, excerpts of which were printed in The Jerusalem Post, seizes on a dockworkers union’s characterization of the protesters as “threatening,” and questions why the police did not do more to squelch the demonstration.

The International Longshore and Warehouse Union stated after the last protest on 27 September that “Longshoremen and Clerks trying to report to work were threatened physically at some points of ingress and their personal vehicles were physically blocked.”

The Zionist Organization of America’s Klein writes:

“Why didn’t the police intervene and ensure that international commerce could proceed unimpeded? Why didn’t the police arrest the protesters, who may well have violated the law by physically threatening dockworkers, physically blocking personal vehicles, and preventing the ship from docking and unloading as authorized?”

Klein’s public relations manager declined to give The Electronic Intifada the full letter because he did not want his client to be “conveyed in any negative context.”

JCRC intervention

In August, another Israel advocacy group, the Jewish Community Relations Council(JCRC), issued a press statement condemning the port protests as an “overt expression of extremism” that “unjustly singles out” Israel.

A public records request to the City of Oakland reveals that the port managers met with leaders of the JCRC on 31 July in preparation for the protests scheduled for August.

Emails between Myrna David, JCRC East Bay Regional Director, and city councilmember Dan Kalb indicate the latter was invited but declined to attend the meeting.

Following the meeting, David wrote to Kalb, “We got the impression OPD [Oakland Police Department] is expected on the scene and should be well prepared.”

Rabbi Doug Kahn, executive director of the JCRC, was included on the email thread. Kahn is a leading anti-Palestinian voice in the Bay Area and vocal opponent of the boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement.

The JCRC and Kahn have a long history of organizing against and stifling Palestine support work in the Bay Area, as has been documented previously by The Electronic Intifada.

In 2006, the JCRC characterized a proposed mural at San Francisco State University, designed to honor the late Palestinian scholar Edward Said, as “threatening” to Jewish students on campus. The group helped pressure the university administration to censor the imagery in the mural.

Using a similar charge, in 2007, the JCRC worked with the Anti-Defamation League to pressure the San Francisco Arts Commission to compel artists working on a local mural to eliminate Palestinian symbols from it.

And in 2011, the JCRC played a central role in pressuring the Museum of Children’s Art (MOCHA) in Oakland to cancel an exhibition of drawings done by Palestinian children from Gaza which Kahn said could “potentially create an unsafe atmosphere for Jewish children.”

The JCRC did not respond to The Electronic Intifada’s request for comment.

Port shutdowns

Seeking the intervention of the police and local government leaders, port representatives have expressed concern that the site has become a regular target for political protests since the Occupy movement emerged in late 2011.

On 8 August, the president of the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association wrote to a handful of state leaders, including Governor Jerry Brown and the Oakland mayor, that:

“The Port has become a focal point for demonstrators as an outgrowth of two prior shutdowns of the Port due to the Occupy Movement. The Port of Oakland was the only port in the United States in which operations were halted due to the Occupy demonstrations. Given that well publicized success, the Port of Oakland is now a constant target of those who want to amplify their voice regarding their opinions of any number of issues.”

Robert Bernardo, spokesperson for the Port of Oakland, told The Electronic Intifada that he was not aware of any ongoing conversations with community groups such as the JCRC, but emphasized that the port is “working closely with law enforcement and our business partners to ensure flow of commerce continues even in the case of a peaceful protest.”

“We at the Port of Oakland support free speech, but our main priority is to keep goods flowing,” Bernardo said.

When asked to describe how they would “ensure” that, Bernardo conceded that it was not possible to predict or go into the details.

Undeterred protests

Activists in California prevented two vessels belonging to Israel’s largest shipping company from unloading any of its cargo at the Oakland port for two weekends in the last two months, and the Block the Boat Coalition is planning another protest for 25 October.

The coalition which planned August’s protest that brought out thousands of demonstrators to the port and prevented the ship’s unloading for four consecutive days say they hope to build a broad base of support for the actions by strengthening ties between the workers and Palestine solidarity groups.

“The Zim Line reflects the huge flow of capital from Israel into the Bay Area and it is an opportunity for building a relationship between workers and Palestine solidarity activists,” Lara Kiswani, executive director of the Arab Resource and Organizing Center, said in August.

And despite the language used by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union in their 27 September statement, Block the Boat organizers have stressed their outreach to dock workers and organized labor for the protest later this month.

Contrary to some media reports as well as a statement issued by the ILWU, the repeat of the picket line last month was not organized by the same Block the Boat coalition which plannd the August action. A new group calling itself the “Stop Zim Action Committee” called for the picket line, and successfully convinced workers to abstain from working the Zim Line on the morning of 27 September.

ILWU has a long history of refusing to load ships from countries engaging in gross violations of human rights. In the 1930s, West Coast dockworkers refused to load and offload ships belonging to Italy after they invaded Ethiopia, and Japan after it invaded Manchuria.

In 1978 and 1980, ILWU refused to load military cargo headed for Chile and El Salvador, respectively. And in 1984, the union refused to unload a South African ship for eleven consecutive days.

Tags: Zim protestZionistsArrestStop Zim Action Committee
Categories: Labor News

Ebola fears cause SEIU airport workers to walk out in New York

Current News - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 23:53

Ebola fears cause airport workers to walk out in New York
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/dr-gridlock/wp/2014/10/09/ebola-fear...
By Ashley Halsey III October 9 at 10:55 AM

Airline passengers arriving from the three West African countries experiencing an unprecedented Ebola outbreak will now be screened for potential exposure to the deadly disease. (AP)
Fearful of exposure to Ebola, about 200 of the people who clean airplane cabins walked off the job overnight at LaGuardia International Airport.

The walkout came a day after health and safety experts from the Service Employees International Union, which represents many unionized airport employees, raised concerns over whether cabin cleaners were being adequately protected.

“As a physician I know first-hand that it takes a team of people and proper protocols to safeguard against the spread of Ebola and other infectious diseases,” said L. Toni Lewis of the SEIU. “It’s people on the front line, like cabin cleaners, who are the first line of defense against protecting the general public from contamination. SEIU is proud to step up to provide this essential education and training.”

The union said its members need to be better prepared to deal with the threat.

“This workforce needs effective training – and it needs to happen now,” said Mark Catlin, also of the SEIU. “While employers – the contractors who hire airplane cabin cleaners – have primary responsibility for training their workers, SEIU is hosting tomorrow’s briefing to ensure our members are prepared. It’s imperative that a crisis situation won’t be the first time they’ve seen the required equipment.”

The government plans to begin taking the temperatures of travelers from West Africa arriving at five U.S. airports as part of a stepped-up response to the Ebola epidemic. (AP)
Alberto Grant, Jr., an airway terminal cleaner at John F. Kennedy International Airport, articulated member fears.

“When we clean the bathrooms, we are exposed to everything, so we definitely need this training,” said Grant. “In the past contractors have told us just to wash our hands and use gloves. Cleaning kits aren’t readily available to protect against the various bodily fluids we encounter every day. Sometimes all we have are paper towels to wipe down the bathrooms.”

Catlin and Lewis planned to lead training sessions for airport cabin cleaners, terminal cleaners, and wheelchair attendants in New York on Thursday, covering guidelines from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and the International Air Transport Association.

The CDC guidance for cleaning cabins is outlined in a directive to airlines:

Ebola spreads through direct contact by touching the blood or other body fluids (like feces, saliva, urine, vomit, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola. Infected blood or other body fluids can spread Ebola through breaks in your skin or if they get into your eyes, nose, or mouth.

Treat any body fluid as though it is infectious. Hand hygiene is the most important infection control measure.

When cleaning aircraft and any contaminated areas after a flight with a sick traveler who may have Ebola, CDC recommends that personnel:
Use disposable protective equipment while cleaning the passenger cabin and lavatories. If working with reusable equipment, properly clean and disinfect it after use.

Waterproof gloves
Change gloves if they become dirty or damaged during cleaning.
Consider double-gloving if cleaning large amounts of blood or other body fluids.
Throw away used gloves according to your company’s recommended infection control precautions.
Clean hands with soap and water immediately after gloves are removed or when changing gloves. (When soap is not available, use waterless alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.) Use only soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
Surgical mask
Eye protection: goggles or face shield
Long-sleeved, waterproof gown
Closed-toe shoes and shoe covers. If increased risk of splashing or area appears highly contaminated with body fluids, wear rubber boots or shoe covers. Wear gloves to carefully remove shoe covers to avoid contamination of hands.
Safe removal and hygiene

Carefully remove protective equipment to avoid contaminating yourself or your clothes.
After removing protective equipment, clean your hands. Use only soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
Clean affected areas

Use an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered cleaner/disinfectant that has been tested and approved for use by the airplane manufacturers.

Lavatory surfaces: door handle, lock, faucet, sink, walls, counter, and toilet seat.
Sick traveler’s seat and the seats around it, seat backs, armrests, tray tables, video monitor, light and air controls, and adjacent walls and windows
If a seat cover or carpet is obviously dirty from blood or body fluids, it should be removed and discarded by the methods used for biohazardous material.
If surfaces are contaminated with large amounts of body fluids (such as blood, vomit, feces), clean off the material before applying disinfectant.
Special considerations

Special cleaning of upholstery, carpets, or storage compartments is not indicated unless they are obviously dirty from blood or other body fluids.
Special vacuuming equipment or procedures are not necessary.
Do NOT use compressed air, pressurized water or similar procedures, which might create droplets of infectious materials.

Ashley Halsey reports on national and local transportation.

Tags: Ebolaairline workersCleanersSEIU
Categories: Labor News

Swaziland: Monarchy Bans All Union and Employer Federations

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITUC
Categories: Labor News

NRF Letter to PMA, ILWU on Contract Negotiations, Port Congestion

Current News - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 14:19

NRF Letter to PMA, ILWU on Contract Negotiations, Port Congestion
http://www.worldtradewt100.com/articles/90588-nrf-letter-to-pma-ilwu-on-...
October 9, 2014 No Comments
The National Retail Federation (NRF) sent a letter to the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) and Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) urging the two parties to conclude their contract negotiations.
NRF cited the ongoing contract negotiations for adversely impacting the supply chain, eviscerating retailers’ contingency plans and contributing to port congestion at the West Coast ports, specifically at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.
You will find our letter attached as well as pasted below:
Dear Mr. McEllrath and Mr. McKenna:
The members of the National Retail Federation (NRF), and the millions of workers we employ and customers we serve, have a key interest in seeing the negotiations between the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) reach a successful and speedy conclusion. We commend the PMA and the ILWU for staying at the table and continuing to negotiate a new agreement, but the failure to reach an agreement is now having a significant impact on port operations and contributing to port congestion in significant and damaging ways.
We urge the parties to quickly come to a conclusion on a new labor agreement as a means to resolve the ongoing congestion issues impacting the West Coast ports. At a minimum, we ask that the parties extend the expired contract through November in order to reinstate arbitration agreements, which are preventing many issues at the ports from being addressed.
Retailers are now in the midst of their heaviest shipping season of the year preparing for the upcoming holidays, which are a ‘make it or break it’ time for retailers and merchants. While we recognize that there are many reasons for the current port congestion, there is no doubt that the lack of a new labor contract between PMA and the ILWU is having a big impact on port productivity, particularly in Southern California.
As you know retailers began instituting costly contingency plans in early 2014 to ensure that merchandise would reach stores in time for the critical holiday shopping season. The current congestion at West Coast ports has eviscerated those preparations in many cases which may cause critical merchandise to miss target on-sale dates.
Finalizing a new labor contract is an absolutely critical component to working through the backlog of shipping containers now piling up at West Coast ports. We are deeply troubled by the fact that no apparent progress has been made in the negotiations since August, when the PMA and ILWU announced a “tentative deal” on health benefits. Whether intentional or not, the fact that neither the PMA nor ILWU has made any public progress report in more than a month is sending a very troublesome and disconcerting signal.
Shippers look for certainty when making strategic long-term supply chain investments, or for placing transportation orders for discretionary cargo. The ongoing negotiations and the degradation of operating efficiency, specifically at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, is making the region unattractive for future investment and will lead to a permanent shift of cargo.
NRF is the world’s largest retail trade association, representing discount and department stores, home goods and specialty stores, Main Street merchants, grocers, wholesalers, chain restaurants and Internet retailers from the United States and more than 45 countries. Retail is the nation’s largest private sector employer, supporting one in four U.S. jobs – 42 million working Americans. Contributing $2.6 trillion to annual GDP, retail is a daily barometer for the nation’s economy. NRF’s This is Retail campaign highlights the industry’s opportunities for life-long careers, how retailers strengthen communities, and the critical role that retail plays in driving innovation.
We strongly urge both of your organizations to quickly resolve the remaining issues under negotiation in order to arrive at a new contract as soon as possible. These negotiations are critically important to the retail industry and the broader economy, and must be resolved quickly and amicably. If you have any questions, please contact Jonathan Gold, NRF’s Vice President, Supply Chain and Customs Policy at (202) 626-8193. Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Matt Shay
President and CEO

CC: The Honorable Eric Garcetti, Mayor of Los Angeles
The Honorable Robert Garcia, Mayor of Long Beach
Mr. Gene Seroka, Executive Director, Port of Los Angeles
Mr. Jon Slangerup, Chief Executive, Port of Long Beach

Tags: ilwuPMACoast Contract
Categories: Labor News

NRF Letter to PMA, ILWU on Contract Negotiations, Port Congestion

Current News - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 14:19

NRF Letter to PMA, ILWU on Contract Negotiations, Port Congestion
http://www.worldtradewt100.com/articles/90588-nrf-letter-to-pma-ilwu-on-...
October 9, 2014 No Comments
The National Retail Federation (NRF) sent a letter to the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) and Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) urging the two parties to conclude their contract negotiations.
NRF cited the ongoing contract negotiations for adversely impacting the supply chain, eviscerating retailers’ contingency plans and contributing to port congestion at the West Coast ports, specifically at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.
You will find our letter attached as well as pasted below:
Dear Mr. McEllrath and Mr. McKenna:
The members of the National Retail Federation (NRF), and the millions of workers we employ and customers we serve, have a key interest in seeing the negotiations between the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) reach a successful and speedy conclusion. We commend the PMA and the ILWU for staying at the table and continuing to negotiate a new agreement, but the failure to reach an agreement is now having a significant impact on port operations and contributing to port congestion in significant and damaging ways.
We urge the parties to quickly come to a conclusion on a new labor agreement as a means to resolve the ongoing congestion issues impacting the West Coast ports. At a minimum, we ask that the parties extend the expired contract through November in order to reinstate arbitration agreements, which are preventing many issues at the ports from being addressed.
Retailers are now in the midst of their heaviest shipping season of the year preparing for the upcoming holidays, which are a ‘make it or break it’ time for retailers and merchants. While we recognize that there are many reasons for the current port congestion, there is no doubt that the lack of a new labor contract between PMA and the ILWU is having a big impact on port productivity, particularly in Southern California.
As you know retailers began instituting costly contingency plans in early 2014 to ensure that merchandise would reach stores in time for the critical holiday shopping season. The current congestion at West Coast ports has eviscerated those preparations in many cases which may cause critical merchandise to miss target on-sale dates.
Finalizing a new labor contract is an absolutely critical component to working through the backlog of shipping containers now piling up at West Coast ports. We are deeply troubled by the fact that no apparent progress has been made in the negotiations since August, when the PMA and ILWU announced a “tentative deal” on health benefits. Whether intentional or not, the fact that neither the PMA nor ILWU has made any public progress report in more than a month is sending a very troublesome and disconcerting signal.
Shippers look for certainty when making strategic long-term supply chain investments, or for placing transportation orders for discretionary cargo. The ongoing negotiations and the degradation of operating efficiency, specifically at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, is making the region unattractive for future investment and will lead to a permanent shift of cargo.
NRF is the world’s largest retail trade association, representing discount and department stores, home goods and specialty stores, Main Street merchants, grocers, wholesalers, chain restaurants and Internet retailers from the United States and more than 45 countries. Retail is the nation’s largest private sector employer, supporting one in four U.S. jobs – 42 million working Americans. Contributing $2.6 trillion to annual GDP, retail is a daily barometer for the nation’s economy. NRF’s This is Retail campaign highlights the industry’s opportunities for life-long careers, how retailers strengthen communities, and the critical role that retail plays in driving innovation.
We strongly urge both of your organizations to quickly resolve the remaining issues under negotiation in order to arrive at a new contract as soon as possible. These negotiations are critically important to the retail industry and the broader economy, and must be resolved quickly and amicably. If you have any questions, please contact Jonathan Gold, NRF’s Vice President, Supply Chain and Customs Policy at (202) 626-8193. Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Matt Shay
President and CEO

CC: The Honorable Eric Garcetti, Mayor of Los Angeles
The Honorable Robert Garcia, Mayor of Long Beach
Mr. Gene Seroka, Executive Director, Port of Los Angeles
Mr. Jon Slangerup, Chief Executive, Port of Long Beach

Tags: ilwuPMACoast Contract
Categories: Labor News

UK Tube strike suspended after 'substantial progress' in talks

Current News - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 11:34

UK Tube strike suspended after 'substantial progress' in talks
9 October 2014 Last updated at 09:38 ET
UK Tube strike suspended after 'substantial progress' in talks
The strike was been called off after "substantial progress" in talks, the RMT union said
A planned 48-hour strike by London Underground workers has been suspended following talks.
Tube staff had intended to strike next week, from 21:00 BST on Tuesday until 20:59 on Thursday, as part of a long-running dispute over staff cuts.
The Rail, Maritime and Transport Union (RMT) said "significant progress" had been made in three key areas of talks with Transport for London (TfL).
The dispute is over TfL plans to save £50m a year by closing ticket offices.
It says it needs to save £4.2bn by 2020.
Originally, 953 jobs were to go but that figure has now been reduced to 897 and TfL said it anticipated that the number would fall further as a result of continued discussions.

TfL wants to close all ticket offices across the Tube network
Following a meeting at the conciliation service Acas, the two parties also agreed to continue consultations on the changes.
RMT General Secretary Mick Cash said: "The substantial improvements we have agreed allow us to move forwards but the union's core opposition to the austerity-led cuts on London Underground has not shifted an inch and we remain vigilant to further developments and their impact."
Phil Hufton, chief operating officer of London Underground, said: "Nothing positive would be achieved through this strike action and this threat had no logic to it whatsoever apart from attempting to disrupt hard working Londoners and their [RMT] members losing two days pay.
"By simply continuing to talk without imposing unnecessary threats is obviously the best solution, which is recognised by the other trades unions."

Tags: UKTubeRMTLondon
Categories: Labor News

SF Taxi Drivers Stage Noisy Protest Outside Uber HQ

Current News - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 07:53

SF Taxi Drivers Stage Noisy Protest Outside Uber HQ
http://www.sfweekly.com/thesnitch/2014/10/08/taxi-drivers-stage-noisy-pr...
Posted By Rachel Swan
@rachelswan
on Wed, Oct 8, 2014 at 3:56 PM

Rachel Swan
The dozens of taxi drivers who flocked to Uber's mid-Market headquarters today had the usual litany of complaints about how app-based car-hire services are eviscerating the cab industry, and the usual slogans about unfair competition and evil tech companies. One sign framed the battle in Biblical terms: "What would Jesus do?" it asked. Answer: "Hail a taxi."

But today's protest had a sense of palpable desperation that's gradually overtaken the cab industry — or what's left of it — since drivers began protesting their tech counterparts last year. Winter is coming, and it's traditionally a slow season for cabs, as the Examiner reported. And while Uber may have raised safety concerns after a widely publicized hammer assault in September, the company doesn't appear to be going anywhere.

So taxi drivers are fighting back with the best weapon they have: noisy, irritating, uninhibitedly honking horns. A line of cabs from various San Francisco companies circled the block of outside 1455 Market St. today, where Uber cohabitates with social media startup Square. They blared their horns for an uninterrupted hour-and-a-half during lunch hour, allowing the protest to resonate for at least two blocks in every direction.

Tags: UberTaxi drivers
Categories: Labor News

Taxi Drivers Stage Noisy Protest Outside Uber HQ

Current News - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 07:48

SF Taxi Drivers Stage Noisy Protest Outside Uber HQ
http://www.sfweekly.com/thesnitch/2014/10/08/taxi-drivers-stage-noisy-pr...
Posted By Rachel Swan
@rachelswan
on Wed, Oct 8, 2014 at 3:56 PM

Rachel Swan
The dozens of taxi drivers who flocked to Uber's mid-Market headquarters today had the usual litany of complaints about how app-based car-hire services are eviscerating the cab industry, and the usual slogans about unfair competition and evil tech companies. One sign framed the battle in Biblical terms: "What would Jesus do?" it asked. Answer: "Hail a taxi."

But today's protest had a sense of palpable desperation that's gradually overtaken the cab industry — or what's left of it — since drivers began protesting their tech counterparts last year. Winter is coming, and it's traditionally a slow season for cabs, as the Examiner reported. And while Uber may have raised safety concerns after a widely publicized hammer assault in September, the company doesn't appear to be going anywhere.

So taxi drivers are fighting back with the best weapon they have: noisy, irritating, uninhibitedly honking horns. A line of cabs from various San Francisco companies circled the block of outside 1455 Market St. today, where Uber cohabitates with social media startup Square. They blared their horns for an uninterrupted hour-and-a-half during lunch hour, allowing the protest to resonate for at least two blocks in every direction.

Tags: Taxi driversUberCabbies
Categories: Labor News

ILA 1235 Former Pres Sentenced To Prison

Current News - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 07:08

ILA 1235 Former Pres Sentenced To Prison
Longshoremen’s union boss sentenced to 18 months in prison
http://njtoday.net/2014/10/08/longshoremens-union-boss-sentenced-18-mont...
by staff report • October 8, 2014 • 0 Comments

NEWARK, N.J. – The former president of the International Longshoremen’s Association (ILA) Local 1235 was sentenced today to 18 months in prison for conspiring to extort longshoremen on the New Jersey piers for Christmastime tribute payments, New Jersey U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman and Eastern District of New York U.S. Attorney Loretta E. Lynch announced.
Vincent Aulisi, 82, of West Orange – the president of ILA Local 1235 from 2006 through 2007 – previously pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Claire C. Cecchi to one count of an indictment charging him with conspiring to extort Christmastime tributes from ILA Local 1235 members. Judge Cecchi imposed the sentence today in Newark federal court.
According to documents filed in this case and statements made in court:
Aulisi and two other former ILA officers – Thomas Leonardis, 57, of Glen Gardner, the president of the union from approximately 2008 through 2011; and Robert Ruiz, 55, of Watchung, New Jersey, the delegate of the union from approximately 2007 through 2010 – admitted that they conspired to compel tribute payments from ILA union members, who made the payments based on actual and threatened force, violence and fear. The timing of the extortions typically coincided with the receipt by certain ILA members of “Container Royalty Fund” checks, a form of year-end compensation. Leonardis and Ruiz were suspended from their positions following their arrests in January 2011. Aulisi had already retired from his employment on the New Jersey piers at the time of his arrest.
Charges are still pending against three defendants in the superseding indictment, including a racketeering conspiracy charge against Stephen Depiro, 59, of Kenilworth – a soldier in the Genovese organized crime family of La Cosa Nostra.
Since at least 2005, Depiro has managed the Genovese family’s control over the New Jersey waterfront – including the nearly three-decades-long extortion of port workers in ILA Local 1, ILA Local 1235, and ILA Local 1478.
Members of the Genovese family, including Depiro, are charged with conspiring to collect tribute payments from New Jersey port workers at Christmastime each year through their corrupt influence over union officials, including the last three presidents of Local 1235.
Two other Genovese family associates charged in the case are former union officials: Albert Cernadas, Sr. 79, of Union, the president of ILA Local 1235 from approximately 1981 to 2006 and former ILA executive vice president; and Nunzio LaGrasso, 63, of Florham Park, the former vice president of ILA Local 1478 and former ILA representative.
Cernadas is the father of an assistant prosecutor at Union County Prosecutor’s Office.
In addition to the prison term, Judge Cecchi sentenced Aulisi to serve one year of supervised release and fined him $10,000.
The U.S. Attorneys credited the FBI in New Jersey, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Aaron T. Ford, and in New York, under the direction of Assistant Director in Charge George Venizelos; as well as the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Inspector General, Office of Labor Racketeering and Fraud Investigations, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Cheryl Garcia of the New York Regional Office, with the investigation.
The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Anthony Mahajan of the U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of New Jersey, and Jacquelyn M. Kasulis of the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Eastern District of New York.
The charges and allegations against the remaining defendants are merely accusations and they are considered innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Tags: ILAcorruption
Categories: Labor News

Uber hammer attack may clarify firm’s responsibilitiesn "Calling an Uber car at the end of the night, “was supposed to be the responsible, safe thing,” he said. “Instead it’s one of the scariest things I’ve ever experienced.”

Current News - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 06:37

Uber hammer attack may clarify firm’s responsibilities
http://www.sfgate.com/business/article/Uber-hammer-attack-may-clarify-fi...
By Carolyn Said Updated 7:06 pm, Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Uber passenger Roberto Chicas, (right) appears with attorney Harry Stern at a press conference. Chicas, who was allegedly attacked by a driver with a hammer, says he might lose vision in his left eye or the eye itself.
Uber passenger Roberto Chicas, (right) appears with attorney Harry Stern at a press conference. Chicas, who was allegedly attacked by a driver with a hammer, says he might lose vision in his left eye or the eye itself.
His left eye swollen shut and his face battered, Roberto Chicas met the press on Wednesday to discuss his alleged assault two weeks ago by a hammer-wielding UberX driver.
“I got in the car with my friends, and the next thing I remember was waking up in the ICU with doctors all around me,” said Chicas, 35, a San Francisco bartender. “They said I had a concussion, multiple face fractures and would need facial reconstruction surgery.” Worst of all, doctors told Chicas he might lose vision in his left eye, or the eye itself.
“The thought of losing my eye is scary,” Chicas told TV and print reporters at a press conference arranged by his lawyer.
Chicas’ case underscores the legal gray area in which Uber operates. Uber says its drivers are independent contractors, not employees. It calls itself a technology marketplace, not a transportation company. Its terms of service for passengers declare in all caps that they release the company from liability, claims or damages related to “the third-party transportation provider.”
But now, several cases, including that of Chicas and a class-action lawsuit by Uber drivers claiming that they are employees, may help clarify Uber’s responsibilities.
Harry Stern, Chicas’ attorney, says Uber is liable for the actions of its drivers. The alleged assailant, Patrick Karajah, 26, was driving for Uber’s lower-cost UberX service in which nonprofessional drivers offer paid rides in their personal vehicles.
“You can’t offer this service, reap the benefits and profits, and not take responsibility,” Stern said.
Janelle Orsi, an attorny at the Sustainable Economies Law Center in Berkeley who specializes in the sharing economy, said Uber potentially could find a defense in the Communications Decency Act, the landmark 1996 law that shields Internet companies from liability for the words and actions of those who use their services.
However, she said, the more that Uber controls the way its drivers work and how much they charge, the more it appears that those drivers might be employees.
Uber does a criminal background check on all drivers, although critics say it’s less thorough than those done by taxi companies.
While Karajah did not have a criminal record, Stern said a personal interview by Uber would have uncovered “someone who’s erratic; who wouldn’t have passed the smell test in a face-to-face interaction.” Stern was unable to say whether Uber had interviewed the driver in person and Uber did not comment on that. Karajah was charged with assault with a deadly weapon and battery with serious bodily injury, and has pleaded not guilty.
In an e-mail, Uber said: “This was a deplorable incident and we wish Mr. Chicas a quick recovery. Uber’s insurance provider is in contact with representatives of both the rider and driver, and of course we will continue to cooperate with authorities throughout the investigation.”
Ironically, Stern said, the receipt Uber e-mailed Chicas for the fateful ride included a $1 “safety fee” surcharge. That may buttress his legal claims. “It adds a layer of argument that they warrant this is safe passage and they charge for that,” Stern said.
Taxi drivers are self-employed independent contractors, but taxicab companies take responsibility for their actions, said Charles Rathbone, assistant manager of Luxor Cabs.
“In a case like the Uber hammer attack, Luxor would recognize that the liability rests with us,” he said in an e-mail. “Our general liability policy provides coverage up to $1 million, including for assault and battery. Taxi companies do not ask passengers to sign away their legal rights as a condition of getting a ride. Uber does that in its terms of service.”
But Orsi said that the Uber disclaimer may not hold up in court.
“Those waivers are only enforceable when the person agreeing to it absolutely understands what they’re getting into, the risks they’re taking on and the rights they’re waiving,” she said. “When embedded in the terms of service that people don’t read, courts are likely to say they’re unenforceable.”
As for Chicas, he’s just focused on healing.
Calling an Uber car at the end of the night, “was supposed to be the responsible, safe thing,” he said. “Instead it’s one of the scariest things I’ve ever experienced.”
Carolyn Said is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. E-mail: csaid@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @csaid

Tags: Ubercab drivers
Categories: Labor News

Transport Workers Solidarity Committee’s response to ILWU International’s Statements on ZIM Protests

Current News - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 20:13

Transport Workers Solidarity Committee’s response to ILWU International’s Statements on ZIM Protests

Recent ILWU press releases and public statements are misleading and conflict with well-established ILWU policies and positions on Palestine and Israel. The editor of the ILWU newspaper, The Dispatcher, at the direction of the ILWU President, can not overturn those policies and positions without a vote by Convention delegates.

The Israeli Consulate’s statement that the ZIM Pireaus sailed from the port of Oakland on August 20 after completing cargo operations is untrue. But for the ILWU Communications Director, Craig Merrilees, to make that same statement, reaffirming the Zionist’s self-serving distortion places the ILWU on the side of those responsible for the recent slaughter of over 2,100 Palestinians, most of them innocent Gazan civilians. The false statement implies that the 5-days of picketing by thousands of protesters had no impact on cargo operations. The original call for a mass protest on August 16 and 17, mobilizing a few thousand was made by a coalition, Block the Boat, initiated by the Arab Research and Organizing Committee. However, subsequent picketing on August 18, 19 and 20 that stopped the ship’s cargo operations was done spontaneously by a smaller group of Bay Area activists, including the Transport Workers Solidarity Committee.
The truth is that after failing to gets its cargo worked at the SSA terminal, ZIM Lines tried to fool protesters that the ship was sailing to Russia, but longshoremen knew otherwise. The ship departed August 19, headed out the Golden Gate at night then abruptly reversed course, made a Williamson turn and headed back to the Port of Oakland, this time to Berth 22. Ports America, the employer, tried to shift longshore workers from another ship to work the ZIM Pireaus but there already was a picket line at the terminal gate. Some ILWU Local 10 members refused to work the ship. Those that reluctantly worked it, despite pressure from the employer and union officials, rebelled by slowing down cargo ops to a crawl. One crane operator boasted that barely 1% of containers was actually moved before the ZIM ship was forced to sail.

On September 27, another ZIM ship, the Shanghai, was picketed on the day and night shifts at SSA by 200 protesters mobilized by the Stop ZIM Action Committee and the Transport Workers Solidarity Committee. Three of the organizers were Local 10 retirees, veterans of ILWU’s 1984 anti-apartheid action in San Francisco. Again, Merrilees put out untrue statements, claiming longshore workers were threatened by picketers and were standing by on safety. Actually, an appeal was made in the union hiring hall that morning asking longshoremen not to work the ZIM ship and informing them of a picket line. In a show of solidarity all longshoremen refused Zim jobs except for one. In the evening SSA agreed to remove police from the picketing area if the union would dispatch the jobs. With no police presence it was the picketers and longshore supporters vs ZIM and SSA. We won hands down!

On September 27, the ILWU International issued a press release falsely stating “ the leadership and membership of the ILWU have taken no position on the Israel/Gaza conflict.” The truth is that ILWU passed a Convention resolution in 1988 characterizing Israeli oppression of Palestinians as “state-sponsored terrorism”. ILWU’s 1991 resolution condemns Zionist “suppression of basic freedoms of speech and assembly” of Palestinians and calls for the “right of self-determination”.

Israel has blockaded the port of Gaza since 1967, stopping all ships and putting port workers and longshoremen out of work for nearly 50 years. In 2002, Local 10 officers signed a statement “For International Labor Solidarity to Stop Zionist Repression and Build a Just Peace” to protest the Zionist bombing of the headquarters of the Palestinian General Federation of Trade Unions in the West Bank city of Nablus.

The Journal of Commerce (August 20), the maritime bosses’ newspaper, quoted Communications Director Merrilees: “ILWU members felt threatened by the large number of demonstrators” and made a similar statement regarding the September dock protest. But the truth is the threat to longshoremen comes from the police not protesters. As Local 10 president Melvin Mackay told the San Francisco Chronicle, longshoremen would not work the ship “under armed police escort—not with our experience with the police…”

In a 2003 court case against the Oakland Police Department for shooting so-called “non-lethal” weapons at longshore workers and anti-war protesters, ILWU attorney Rob Remar meticulously documented coordinated police violence against longshore workers since the 1934 Maritime Strike in which two strikers were killed by cops, provoking the San Francisco General Strike. Nowadays ILWU International officers try to deny our militant history and undermine any semblance of class struggle on the docks, especially in the midst of the current contract negotiations. With no contract in place longshoremen can take job actions during negotiations to bolster the union at the bargaining table but the “top down” bureaucracy has reigned in the ranks, preventing the union from flexing its muscle.

Nevertheless, Local 10 has tried to continue ILWU’s proud history of solidarity actions by introducing a resolution at the 2009 Convention “commending the South African dockworkers union for taking a strike action against an Israeli ship in Durban to protest the massacre of 1400 Palestinians by the Israeli army in Gaza”. A year after the Convention resolution passed unanimously, the Local 10 Executive Board voted to “call on the ILWU International officers to lend their voice in protest with other unions against this atrocity by issuing a policy statement in line with the ILWU’s past position on the question of Israeli repression of Palestinians and call for unions to protest by any action they choose to take.” That motion paved the way for Local 10 longshoremen in 2010 in collaboration with anti-Zionist demonstrators to conduct the first-ever job action by an American trade union protesting repressive Israeli government policies. Meanwhile, ILWU International officers have only reaffirmed Israel’s press statements and run a biased pro-Israel article in The Dispatcher (January 2007) by International Secretary-Treasurer Willie Adams with no mention of the plight of Palestinians. It’s time for ILWU International officers to get on board: Oppose apartheid in Israel just as we did in South Africa. The rank and file have shown the way.

Tags: ILUW InternationalZim LInesolidarityZionism
Categories: Labor News

China: Top Beijing Communist lobbies for closer ties between ITUC and ACFTU

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Xinhua
Categories: Labor News

Somalia: Temporary Settlement To Largest Labour Dispute In Over Two Decades

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: RBC
Categories: Labor News

Con-way Freight Raises Driver Pay Ahead of Union Votes in California

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 12:38
Rip WatsonTransport TopicsOctober 8, 2014

Con-way Freight announced a driver pay increase Sept. 30, several weeks before scheduled union representation elections at three Southern California terminals.

Con-way, whose less than truck load unit is the third largest in the United States , said the increase and faster progression to the top rate was tied to the driver shortage.

Click here to read more.

Issues: Freight
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Ethics On the Waterfront: Where have All the Humans Gone? ILWU Coast Contract Fight Over Technology

Current News - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 12:30

Ethics On the Waterfront: Where have All the Humans Gone? ILWU Coast Contract Fight Over Technology
http://www.citywatchla.com/lead-stories-hidden/7663-ethics-on-the-waterf...
07 Oct 2014
CITYWATCH-LA Harbor
Written by James Preston Allen

AT LENGTH-The American flag barely flaps in the breeze, when the sun risesbehind the Vincent Thomas Bridge, as seen from Eastview Little League baseball fields atop TraPac’s new automated OCR cranes at berths 134-139 can be seen idle with little movement on the docks from that vantage point.
TraPac recently has installed and begun testing the new cranes which utilizes a complete optical character recognition (OCR) solution for every entry and exit point of their terminal. The technology would make the terminal fully automated.
A source told me that the automated cranes there hasn’t been operating for the past two weeks following a health and safety grievance filing by the ILWU. The union claimed that TraPac’s new technology is dangerous following a dozen accidents on that terminal since the automated part of the facility was finished.
The new automated cranes even showed problems on its inaugural launch, with all the executives on site. An accident was avoided only by the quick use of the override switch by a union crane driver.
New technology seems to be the buzzword these days around the harbor with various entities both private and public heralding the economic and environmental benefits of “hi-tech” advances. Even the new Executive Director of the Port of Los Angeles Gene Seroka waxed on about how new technologies had reduced air pollution by some 45 percent throughout the past decade, at the San Pedro Chamber leadership breakfast.
Yet, it was the previous POLA Executive Director Geraldine Knatz who signed off on the $150 million to $210 million (there seems to be some disagreement as to exactly how much) TraPac’s transition to fully automate the terminal. It is generally understood that her arrogance for not getting mayoral or city council approval was the cause for her “resignation” this ast year.
Whatever the actual amount was, it left a hole in the current POLA budget that has caused the Board of Harbor Commissioners and Mayor Eric Garcetti to do some deep soul searching on future expenses and the direction this port takes in remaining competitive in the global trade.
The problem is that this TraPac deficit or investment, depending on how you look at it, has caused the Harbor Commission to postpone and delay other long-promised waterfront developments. The trouble with this “hi-tech” solution and its “hi-cost” expense is that it currently can’t prove itself to be safe at any speed, cost millions to install and will cost good paying jobs on the waterfront. It is unclear how many years it will take the port to recoup the investment. More importantly, should the port be investing in this yet to be proven safe technology that will contribute to more job losses than it creates?
This one terminal has now become a focal point of the entire West Coast contract negotiations between the ILWU and the Pacific Maritime Association and as of this past week, I have been told the TraPac board is split on whether to settle the dispute or call for a lockout of the ILWU.
This, of course, could have far reaching impact on all concerned. A lockout could trigger a complete collapse of the West Coast contract talks, cause a stoppage of all cargo in every port from Vancouver, B.C. to San Diego and could cause far reaching economic impacts from here to Chicago.
This, I predict, would call for immediate presidential intervention and I’m not so sure how the PMA would fare with a Barack Obama-appointed arbitrator settling the dispute.
This may end up as being one of those historic moments, though, when everything changes, like the year longshoring changed to containerization. And I am not convinced that the majority of ILWU workers understand what’s at stake.
These new technologies will replace as many as 25 percent of the current jobs and the jobs that remain or the new jobs created will mostly take a higher skill set than what most of these workers are trained in. Our schools and universities are not even ramped up to teach to this level yet. The question is whether any new jobs created by automation will in fact remain here or even be under the jurisdiction of the ILWU?
I would bet that this last question is the crux of the long drawn-out contract negotiations that hangs over the ILWU and PMA jointly. How many jobs remain and who represents the new jobs that are created? It doesn’t take much to imagine a sci-fi future in which our aspiration for automation has progressed so far that the PMA wants to replace all workers with androids and that the entire port operates on a 24-hour schedule with no holidays, no overtime and no grumbling from the robots.

Tags: ilwuCoast ContractAutomationtechnologyTrapac Board
Categories: Labor News

Teamsters Warehouse Workers Face a Bankruptcy Court Designed to Protect Bosses, Not Workers

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 12:26
Bruce VailIn These TimesOctober 8, 2014View the original piece

Leaders of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters are mobilizing their forces in the wake of an unexpected attack by a notoriously anti-union warehousing company looking to undermine workers with back-room tactics in federal bankruptcy court.

The Keene, New Hampshire-based C&S Wholesale Grocers’s actions could prove to be an immediate threat to the livelihoods of about 1,100 Teamster members in the Mid-Atlantic region, the latest in a series of damaging anti-union maneuvers by the company. The action also highlights the growing market power of C&S, a low-profile company that has quietly grown into the nation’s largest warehousing corporation.

Click here to read more at In These Times.

Issues: Warehouse Newswire
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Instead of Training Drivers, Uber Charges $65 to Learn Customer Skills

Current News - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 11:47

http://valleywag.gawker.com/instead-of-training-drivers-uber-charges-65-...
Uber is famous for cutting corners to make a buck. Now a Forbes report reveals that the on-demand service provides no mandatory training of its drivers and doesn't inspect their cars. Rather, Uber charges drivers upwards of $65 for optional customer service classes that could help make the service safer.
Uber Is Basically Training Drivers to Violate California State Law
A pending lawsuit against Uber says the smartphone car service is partially responsible for a…
Read more
In fact, the only official training new drivers receive come from few quick videos showing off the company's app. Everything else is left for the driver to figure out.
[Washington D.C. Uber driver Michael Coe] was never trained on how to navigate the D.C. area or given tips on how to resolve disputes with passengers — both of which could have helped avoid incidents like the alleged hammer attack on Roberto Chicas, where Chicas and the driver argued over the route. Also, no one tried to suss out whether Coe had the right personality for a customer-oriented job — a tall order for car-service app companies, but one that Chicas's attorney, Harry Stern, says Uber should have done.
As paltry training, Uber offers a series of videos like "How to get 5-star ratings" and "What makes Uber great." None of it covers how to handle difficult situations, Coe said. "If your rider is being belligerent, what do you do? What do you do with an unruly passenger?" he said. "We don't know."
When drivers in D.C. sign-up with Uber, they go to a hotel to get their paperwork and their phone leased from Uber, and are then pushed out the door, Coe told Forbes. Theoretically, they can begin driving for Uber as soon as they hit the road.

Instead of making sure drivers are equipped to handle disputes (or disabled customers), the company sells paid classes run by an outside firms to its drivers. One course from 7×7 Executive teaches "driver professionalism tips and basic safety concepts for commercial drivers" and offers a discussion on "common customer service issues and how to address them."
Hopefully the class now instructs drivers to leave the hammer at home.

Tags: Uberregulationcriminal
Categories: Labor News

The Great Wage Slowdown of the 21st Century

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 07:03
David LeonhardtThe New York TimesOctober 8, 2014View the original piece

American workers have been receiving meager pay increases for so long now that it’s reasonable to talk in sweeping terms about the trend. It is the great wage slowdown of the 21st century.

The typical American family makes less than the typical family did 15 years ago, a statement that hadn’t previously been true since the Great Depression. Even as the unemployment rate has fallen in the last few years, wage growth has remained mediocre. Last week’s jobs report offered the latest evidence: The jobless rate fell below 6 percent, yet hourly pay has risen just 2 percent over the last year, not much faster than inflation. The combination has puzzled economists and frustrated workers.

Click here to read more at The New York Times.

Issues: Labor Movement
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Pages

Subscribe to Transport Workers Solidarity Committee aggregator