Feed aggregator

Iran: Ebrahim Madadi sentenced to five years: ITF calls on Iranian government to drop charges

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 08/18/2016 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITF Global Union
Categories: Labor News

Brazil: UNI World Athletes calls for reform of conflicted and unjust global anti-doping regime

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 08/18/2016 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: UNI Global Union
Categories: Labor News

Korea (South): How can it be a crime to protect the rights of workers?

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 08/18/2016 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: BWI Global Union
Categories: Labor News

British Airways cabin crew British Airlines Stewards and Stewardesses Association (BASSA) vote for industrial action but no strike

Current News - Thu, 08/18/2016 - 07:22

British Airways cabin crew vote for industrial action but no strike
Members of 8,800-strong BASSA back action over implementation of new onboard performance review system
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/aug/17/british-airways-ba-cabi...
Unite claims BA’s new performance review system is resulting in cabin crew being blamed for situations that are not their fault. Photograph: Steve Parsons/PA
Simon Goodley
Wednesday 17 August 2016 18.51 BSTLast modified on Wednesday 17 August 2016 22.01 BST

British Airways cabin crew have voted for industrial action, but have stopped short of going on strike in the first dispute between the airline and its flight attendants since the bitter battles of 2010.

Members of the 8,800-strong British Airlines Stewards and Stewardesses Association (BASSA), a section of the country’s largest trade union Unite, backed action short of a strike, with 91% of votes returned in favour.

The move comes as union officials have been pressing the airline to drop its new performance review system, which provides onboard staff with immediate feedback on their performance from passengers and colleagues.

The information is presented via a “dashboard” that includes staff league tables and red warning lights showing if the cabin crew member’s performance has been rated as poor. The airline says such systems are common in all industries and help to improve staff performance.

Unite claims its members are getting blamed for situations that are not their fault, including crew receiving poor feedback from passengers disgruntled about faults in the entertainment systems or air conditioning.

Matt Smith, a regional Unite officer, said: “Our members have voted overwhelmingly against the introduction of this flawed dashboard scheme. The BA management should note the enormous strength of feeling against this policy with what, we suspect, is a hidden agenda of future job losses. A perfectly adequate performance management policy already exists.

“It is completely unfair to expect them to be placed in a league table, competing against each other, over onboard issues that are clearly out of their control.

“Cabin crew time spent on these wasteful performance schemes is crew time not giving passengers value for money in a highly competitive premium market.”

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The industrial action will take the form of cabin crew declining to engage with the new performance management system, including refusing to sign off feedback forms.

The action is a far cry from the bitter dispute of six years ago over staffing levels, when thousands of staff took part in 22 days of walkouts that cost BA £150m. BA’s decision to cut staffing levels on long-haul flights, which triggered the dispute, was not reversed.

In response to the Unite vote, BA said: “We can reassure our customers that they will experience no inconvenience as a consequence of this ballot result. Unite has been clear from the start that it would not take strike action.

“The system we have recently introduced includes feedback from customers about how they are looked after onboard. This sort of feedback is common in all industries and enables us to commend cabin crew who perform well and support those that need to improve.

“A similar system already exists for many crew. It allows us to offer our customers the very highest standards of service. We remain open to discussions with our cabin crew and their union representatives about this new system.”

Tags: British Airlines Stewards and Stewardesses Association (BASSA)British Airwaysstrike
Categories: Labor News

Canada: I Can't Work if I Can't Breathe: Why Labour Must Support Black Lives Matter

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Our Times
Categories: Labor News

Mayor Bill de Blasio Picks Union Buster-NY Citywide Ferry Operator Hornblower Has 'Pathetic' Labor Record, Union Says

Current News - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 09:46

Mayor Bill de Blasio Picks Union Buster NY Citywide Ferry Operator Hornblower Has 'Pathetic' Labor Record, Union Says
https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20160817/battery-park-city/citys-ferry-...

Hornblower is expected to start providing citywide ferry service in 2017.
LOWER MANHATTAN — When Mayor Bill de Blasio announced in the spring that ferry operator Hornblower Inc. had been picked to provide citywide service starting in 2017, he lauded the company for its “decade-long record as a strong union employer.”

But lawsuits by former employees and interviews with union officials who have seen their members lose jobs contradict that labor-friendly description of Hornblower, a nationwide provider of ferries, charter boats and sightseeing tours.

In New York alone, Hornblower has faced accusations of racial discrimination and wage violations.

Two former black employees — one who is the only African-American commercial ferry captain in the New York Harbor — are currently suing the ferry operator’s subsidiary Statue Cruises, claiming they were fired because of their race.

Their accusations were bolstered by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which investigated the claims and found that the company created a hostile environment for the former workers.

The federal agency also concluded that there was reasonable cause to believe the workers were discriminated against based on their race.

Hornblower is also currently facing a class-action lawsuit claiming that it wrongfully withheld tips from catering staff on charter cruises around New York City.

The ferry provider has faced similar lawsuits involving racial discrimination and wage violations in other parts of the country.

It’s also been accused of intimidating employees who have complained about wage violations or tried to self-organize, according to complaints filed with the National Labor Relations Board and a lawsuit.

“Anyone who has spent more than 60 seconds on the internet would discover that their labor record is pathetic and they have no business operating in a city that supports good wages, benefits and respects the right of workers to have unions,” said Craig Merrilees, a spokesman for the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, which saw members lose their jobs after Hornblower took over a lucrative federal contract to operate ferries to Alcatraz Island in 2006.

In March New York City’s Economic Development Corporation chose Hornblower over other bidders to run a new five-borough ferry service. The six-year deal will cost the city at least $30 million a year to subsidize.

Hornblower already has an existing contract with the city through its subsidiary Statue Cruises, which runs boats to the Statue of Liberty from the Battery in Lower Manhattan. DNAinfo New York reported exclusively last week that the city Department of Investigation has opened a probe into Hornblower’s connections to an illegal ticket trade of the Liberty Island cruises.

Hornblower, which has been in business for 35 years and has a current workforce of more than 1,600 employees, said in a statement that it is “very proud of our solid labor record and diverse workforce.”

“The company has put in place fair and strong HR policies and has never been found liable in court for racial discrimination,” the statement said. “All material unfair labor practice complaints involving Hornblower have been dismissed, withdrawn or settled by the parties. We have solid relationships with our crew and the union that represents our crew members, and we are incredibly excited about all of the new quality jobs we are creating in New York City.”

EDC spokesman Anthony Hogrebe also said Hornblower is a good employer, praising it for its commitment to pay a $15 per hour starting wage to its workers a year and a half before the state's minimum wage reaches that level.

“EDC selected Hornblower to operate Citywide Ferry in no small part because of its record of providing good wages and benefits to workers, and strong history of working with organized labor,” Hogrebe said. “We look forward to Citywide Ferry bringing over 150 good-paying jobs to New York Harbor, and we will continue to perform thorough oversight of our operator throughout its contract.”

Andre Washington and Lester Tyson filed a federal lawsuit against Hornblower and Statue Cruises in 2015, claiming they were fired because they were black.

Both men began working for the company Liberty Landing Ferries in 2007. A year later, Hornblower acquired Liberty Landing and took over the cruises to the Statue of Liberty.

Washington, the only black captain operating a commercial ferry in New York Harbor, was highly regarded and filled in for his ship’s regular captain when necessary, according to the lawsuit. Meanwhile, Tyson was a popular deckhand, collecting tickets and helping passengers on and off the ferries.

The lawsuit says that during their final year of employment, Washington and Tyson were treated differently from their white counterparts.

Washington was asked to fill in for the regular captain less frequently.

Instead, the job went to less-experienced captains, including one who garnered the nickname "Captain Crunch" for being so inept that he damaged his ship on several occasions while attempting to dock, the lawsuit says.

Meanwhile, Tyson, who suffers from a medical problem requiring bathroom breaks, was arbitrarily denied use of the restroom by the regular ship captain, according to the lawsuit.

Tyson was also denied a replacement for his worn-out float coat — a jacket used by deckhands that have floatation devices — while a less-senior part-time employee received new one, according to the lawsuit.

The two were ultimately fired in 2013 after the management accused them of stealing time by clocking into work for one another.

The lawsuit says that it was a customary practice for a crew member to punch the clock for co-workers.

Washington and Tyson said in the lawsuit they were always present in each other’s company when they clocked in for one another. Moreover, a separate timesheet was kept on their ship, showing that they did not steal time, the lawsuit says.

The lawsuit says they were the only employees fired for clocking in each other despite other workers doing the same. The two men have also been unable to find work in the harbor since their terminations, according to the lawsuit.

Hornblower has denied the accusations in the lawsuit, and the two sides are currently in settlement talks. A lawyer for Washington and Tyson declined to comment.

Complaints against Hornblower’s labor practices also include:

► Catering staff for Hornblower’s sightseeing and charter operations in New York filed a lawsuit in 2015, claiming that the company didn’t give them proceeds from the service fees that it charged customers.

The lawsuit claims that most customers were led to believe that the service fee was a gratuity for staff. New York law prohibits employers from retaining any portion of an employee’s gratuity or a charge purported to be a tip.

Hornblower has said in filings in the case that when it charges customers an administrative fee for an event, it expressly says the fee is not a gratuity for its employees.

► Jiboku Ayokunle — a black guest-services agent for Hornblower subsidiary Alcatraz Cruises, which provides ferry service to the former prison island off San Francisco — said he quit his job after management didn’t respond to his complaints about his co-workers and supervisors repeatedly making racist remarks to him.

He sued Hornblower in 2015, claiming his civil rights were violated because of the racist verbal abuse as well as being denied promotions. The two sides later settled and signed non-disclosure agreements.

► Cooks and wait staff for Hornblower in Los Angeles sued the company in 2008, claiming they were not provided a rest period during their work day nor were they compensated in pay for the missed rest period. The case was later settled.

► Howard Flecker III, a deckhand for Statue Cruises, filed a lawsuit in 2009 claiming that a collective-bargaining agreement between his maritime union, Local 333, and the boat operator violated New Jersey’s wage laws because he only received overtime pay after working more than 48 hour in a week.

Flecker later claimed Statue Cruises tried to intimidate him by writing a memo informing all its employees about Flecker and his lawsuit and cutting their hours to 40 hours per week until the case was resolved.

Flecker said he later resigned from his job after his co-workers repeatedly confronted him about the lawsuit and the work hours they were losing. While a jury awarded Flecker $560,000 in 2014, the judgment was set aside. Instead Flecker and Statue Cruises reached a settlement.

► Two unions, the Inlandboatmen’s Union of the Pacific and the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots, took legal action against Hornblower in 2006 to try to block the National Park Service from awarding it a 10-year contract to run ferry service to Alcatraz island.

The prior ferry provider ran a union operation but Hornblower was non-union and made all the existing employees reapply for jobs.

Ultimately, the court battle led to Hornblower subsidiary Alcatraz Cruises paying union wages to the employees.

But Marina Secchitano, a regional director at the Inlandboatmen’s Union, said that Alcatraz Cruises didn’t rehire many of its members.

“We had excellent employees for 25 years — top in their field — and they weren’t good enough for [Hornblower owner] Terry Macrae,” Secchitano said.

Hornblower said that of its initial crew at Alcatraz Cruises, about 30 percent were the union predecessor’s employees. It said it hired more union employees from its predecessor than from other Hornblower business units, and that it provided jobs to the most qualified applicants.

The San Francisco-based unions have continued to try to organize Alcatraz Cruises but have been unsuccessful.

The unions and former employees at Alcatraz Cruises have filed five complaints with the National Labor Relations Board between 2010 and 2015 accusing Hornblower of firing or surveilling workers who try to organize a union.

However, the NLRB investigated and determined that the claims were unfounded.

Tags: hornblowerIBUilwuAlcatraz CruisesMayor Bill de Blasiounion busting
Categories: Labor News

Turkey: Kurdish daily shut down and journalists houses raided

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 08/16/2016 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: EFJ
Categories: Labor News

While Attacking Muni Drivers SF MTA Pushes PR Scam With TWU 250A Leaders

Current News - Tue, 08/16/2016 - 10:05

While Attacking Muni Drivers SF MTA Pushes PR Scam With TWU 250A Leaders
New ad campaign to promote safety of SF Muni operators with TWU Pres Williams in collusion with SFMTA While Operators Are Witch Hunted
http://www.sfexaminer.com/new-ad-campaign-promote-safety-muni-operators/

The ads use quotes not just from Muni operators but also from their apparent family members, urging criminals to avoid targeting bus operators. (Courtesy photo)
By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez on August 16, 2016 1:00 am

A new ad campaign that’s set to roll out from the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency targets the safety of an increasingly common victim: Muni operators.

The campaign, which will be launched in conjunction with the Transport Workers Union Local 250-A that represents operators, was revealed to the San Francisco Examiner by the Muni operators’ union in light of the weekend assault of bus driver Carla Romero, 32, of San Francisco.

The ads — 11 drafts of which were shared with the Examiner from the union — use quotes not just from Muni operators but also from their apparent family members, urging criminals to avoid targeting bus operators.

“I get you across town safely, I want to get home safely too,” one ad reads. “Our son gets you to work safely, I want him to get home safely too,” reads another.

The effort to tamp down on assaults traces back to before Romero’s assault, said Eric Williams, head of TWU Local 250-A,Williams, to recent incidents of operators being punched and spat on.

As for Romero, a video showing a physical altercation between Romero and a citizen may exonerate the operator, Williams said Monday.

“She was definitely defending herself,” said Williams of Romero.

Romero told the Examiner she was assaulted by an angry motorist outside the 30-Stockton bus she was driving at Third and Mission streets Saturday morning.

The driver pushed her, she said, then she returned with a punch and he threw her to the ground, beating her. She said he only stopped once she landed a punch on his nose.

Williams said a union shop steward and others reviewed video footage from the operator’s Muni bus. Williams said the video showed it was “very clear” Romero was attacked.

The San Francisco Police Department confirmed both she and the motorist filed a citizen’s arrest against each other, and both were cited for battery.

“Muni operators have a very difficult job and the vast majority do it extremely well,” SFMTA spokesperson Paul Rose said. “While we fully investigate this matter with SFPD to find out exactly what happened, physical violence should never be an option against these dedicated transit employees.”

Tags: TWU 250ASF MTAinjuriesoshahealth and safety
Categories: Labor News

8/17/16 SF Rally Stop Terrorizing SFMTA TWU 250 A Drivers-Driver Carla Ramero Attacked By Motorist And SF MTA Refuses To Release Video Tape

Current News - Mon, 08/15/2016 - 15:40

8/17/16 SF Rally Stop Terrorizing SFMTA TWU 250 A Drivers-Driver Carla Ramero Attacked By Motorist And SF MTA Refuses To Release Video Tape

Press Conference Wednesday August 17, 2016 SFMTA Van Ness And Market St. 12:00 Noon

Defend SF TWU 250A Drivers, Stop Workplace Violence And Cover-up By Management

Carla Ramero, a SFMTA TWU 250A driver was physically attacked on the job by an irate motorist. Instead of defending the driver the SF MTA management are setting her up to be fired. This is not the first time that the SF MTA management have helped target and retaliate against workers. SF MTA 250 A driver and OSHA whistleblower was framed up by the agency after he exposed serious health and safety issues. Dorian had to get a Sunshine Commission order for video tape which vindicated him. He was illegally fired by the SFMTA and was ordered back to work by the California Labor Commissioner but Mayor Ed Lee's MTA bosses are refusing to abide by the order to put him back to work.
We need to stand up for SF MTA 250A drivers and all public workers who are scapegoated and blamed for the increasingly dangerous health and safety conditions on the job. Protecting the public means protecting the whistleblowers and also workers like Ramero who are hung out to dry instead of being defended by SF MTA management.

Dorian Maxwell will attend the press conference and other supporters of transit workers and all public workers.

Press Conference Rally called by
United Public Workers For Action
www.upwa.info
For information
45-282-1908

Additional media
http://archives.sfweekly.com/sanfrancisco/muni-our-transit-agency-has-ne...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLc5D-tgm5o
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74DRR5b6ClE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zquP57iENNE

http://www.sfexaminer.com/muni-operator-says-beaten-fended-off-attacker/
The SF MTA management continues to help frame-up and terrorize SF Muni TWU 250A drivers. The latest driver is
SF TWU 250A Muni operator says she was beaten, but fended off attacker

Muni operator Carla Romero was reportedly attacked by a man on Third Street on Saturday. (Courtesy Carla Romero)
By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez on August 15, 2016 1:00 am

A Muni operator who said she was beaten Saturday morning is also facing charges of assault by the man she claimed threw her to the ground and punched her repeatedly.

She is filing charges as well, she told the San Francisco Examiner.

“I freaked out,” she said. “I felt like he was going to keep coming at me.”

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency confirmed the incident was reported to the agency and to the San Francisco Police Department. SFPD was unable to provide details on the allegations from the man before press time.

The operator, Carla Romero, 32, was driving a 30-Stockton bus on Third Street at 9 a.m. Saturday morning past Mission, when she was told by Muni dispatch to take it back into the yard for repair. She pulled over and exited her vehicle to attach the trolley poles of the bus to a different set of wires, which would allow her to change direction.

An irate driver zoomed past her and shouted, she said. He pulled up in front of her bus, exited the vehicle and approached her.

She said the man appeared to be in his late 50s, and stood taller than her at about 5’9” and had white hair.

“He put his hands on me, he pushed me back,” she said. In the flurry of his attack, she said, “I’m not sure if he punched me, but I threw a punch” defensively, she said.

That’s when he threw her to the ground and punched her repeatedly. She guarded her face with her left arm, but still sustained hits to her jaw on both sides. When Romero came to the Examiner, she had scratches on her face and lumps on her head.

“I managed to punch him in his nose,” she said, which is when he backed off.

The man was unable to flee as a passerby took the key from his ignition and handed it to Romero, she said, which she then gave to the police.

SFMTA spokesperson Paul Rose said he could not comment on details of the case, but said, “we take these issues very seriously and pursue all appropriate actions on incidents that involve our operators.”

SFMTA confirmed SFPD is in possession of video recorded from the side of Romero’s bus. She said she felt confident the footage would show she was attacked.

Romero is a San Francisco native with four children, and said she loves working for Muni. “I’m happy serving the public,” she said, “they’re my people.”

But she wants the public to be more aware of the violence Muni operators sometimes face, which was also highlighted by the Muni operators Transport Workers Union Local 250-A in May this year.

“There’s a lot of my sisters and brothers getting hurt,” she said.

Romero’s first court date is in October, she said.

UPDATE 10:09 a.m.: Monday morning the San Francisco Police Department confirmed both parties, Romero and her claimed attacker, “claimed the other was the aggressor.” Each signed a citizens arrest against the other, according to SFPD, and both were cited for battery.

Tags: twu 250 ahealth and safetyunion rightsCarla Romero
Categories: Labor News

PSR Fleet Memo for August 13 2016

IBU - Mon, 08/15/2016 - 09:15
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Categories: Unions

SF MTA TWW 250A Muni operator says she was beaten, but fended off attacker “There’s a lot of my sisters and brothers getting hurt,” she said. SFMTA Bosses Refuse To Release Video Tape

Current News - Mon, 08/15/2016 - 07:56

SF MTA TWW 250A Muni operator says she was beaten, but fended off attacker “There’s a lot of my sisters and brothers getting hurt,” she said. SFMTA Bosses Refuse To Release Video Tape
http://www.sfexaminer.com/muni-operator-says-beaten-fended-off-attacker/

Muni operator Carla Romero was reportedly attacked by a man on Third Street on Saturday. (Courtesy Carla Romero)
By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez on August 15, 2016 1:00 am

A Muni operator who said she was beaten Saturday morning is also facing charges of assault by the man she claimed threw her to the ground and punched her repeatedly.

She is filing charges as well, she told the San Francisco Examiner.

“I freaked out,” she said. “I felt like he was going to keep coming at me.”

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency confirmed the incident was reported to the agency and to the San Francisco Police Department. SFPD was unable to provide details on the allegations from the man before press time.

The operator, Carla Romero, 32, was driving a 30-Stockton bus on Third Street at 9 a.m. Saturday morning past Mission, when she was told by Muni dispatch to take it back into the yard for repair. She pulled over and exited her vehicle to attach the trolley poles of the bus to a different set of wires, which would allow her to change direction.

An irate driver zoomed past her and shouted, she said. He pulled up in front of her bus, exited the vehicle and approached her.

She said the man appeared to be in his late 50s, and stood taller than her at about 5’9” and had white hair.

“He put his hands on me, he pushed me back,” she said. In the flurry of his attack, she said, “I’m not sure if he punched me, but I threw a punch” defensively, she said.

That’s when he threw her to the ground and punched her repeatedly. She guarded her face with her left arm, but still sustained hits to her jaw on both sides. When Romero came to the Examiner, she had scratches on her face and lumps on her head.

“I managed to punch him in his nose,” she said, which is when he backed off.

The man was unable to flee as a passerby took the key from his ignition and handed it to Romero, she said, which she then gave to the police.

SFMTA spokesperson Paul Rose said he could not comment on details of the case, but said, “we take these issues very seriously and pursue all appropriate actions on incidents that involve our operators.”

SFMTA confirmed SFPD is in possession of video recorded from the side of Romero’s bus. She said she felt confident the footage would show she was attacked.

Romero is a San Francisco native with four children, and said she loves working for Muni. “I’m happy serving the public,” she said, “they’re my people.”

But she wants the public to be more aware of the violence Muni operators sometimes face, which was also highlighted by the Muni operators Transport Workers Union Local 250-A in May this year.

“There’s a lot of my sisters and brothers getting hurt,” she said.

Romero’s first court date is in October, she said.

Tags: health and safetySFMTATWU 250Abus driver
Categories: Labor News

Australia: ACTU rallies to recognise 50 years of struggle for Indigenous Wage Justice

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 08/14/2016 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ACTU
Categories: Labor News

South Africa: Marikana: 4 years later, little has changed

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 08/14/2016 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Independent
Categories: Labor News

Two Big Labor Battles at UAL With AFA & IBT Reach an End at United

Current News - Fri, 08/12/2016 - 20:07

Two Big Labor Battles at UAL With AFA & IBT Reach an End at United
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/13/business/united-and-continental-flight...
By REUTERSAUG. 12, 2016

United flight attendants protested in June at Newark’s Liberty Airport. Fifty-three percent of those voting approved the new contract. CreditRichard Perry/The New York Times
United Continental Holdings said on Friday it had reached labor deals with its flight attendants and its mechanics, whose relations with the airline were strained in recent years as the parties struggled to conclude contract talks.

Flight attendants at the airline voted to approve a contract that will raise their wages between 18 and 31 percent in September, their union said on Friday. About 53 percent of those who voted backed the deal.

Separately, negotiators from the airline and the International Brotherhood of Teamsters reached a labor deal in the last round of United States mediated talks on schedule, the parties said in a joint statement on Friday. They said they must still complete contract language, after which it will become a so-called tentative agreement that the carrier’s 9,000 mechanics can vote to ratify or reject.

Both announcements

represent an important step toward integrating United and Continental and reducing flight cancellations.

Maintenance technicians from United have yet to mix their operations with those from Continental. The same holds true for flight attendants.

For instance, cumbersome rules meant that, for flight crews, United cannot bring in reserve employees from pre-merger Continental if the staff shortage is on a pre-merger United aircraft. This will ultimately change for mechanics and flight attendants under the new contract.

United ranked lowest among United States and Canadian rivals in 2016 in customer satisfaction, according to a J. D. Power study.

“What this means is hopefully a much more reliable United, a much more on-time United and hopefully also a more pleasant United for its customers to fly,” said Henry Harteveldt, founder of the travel consultancy Atmosphere Research Group.

With their new contract, the airline and the flight attendants union said they now expected to integrate flight crews within 12 to 18 months.

That agreement was reached by the airline and union in June under the guidance of the National Mediation Board after months of protests by flight attendants and years of talks. In addition to pay raises, the contract provides better health care and job protection, the union said.

The ratification represented a victory for United’s new chief executive officer, Oscar Munoz, who has sought harmony with workers at the airline, the third-largest United States carrier in passenger traffic. United shares were down less than 1 percent.

“The contract provides immediate economic gains, sets a new industry standard and ensures flight attendants can achieve the benefits of a fully integrated airline,” Sara Nelson, international president of the union, said in a statement.

More than 90 percent of eligible workers voted, the union said.

Furloughs by the airline after the merger had angered employees, but that dissipated beginning in 2014 when United offered voluntary buyouts that more than 2,500 employees accepted.

Mr. Munoz said in a statement he was helping “turn the page and write a new chapter in our approach to labor and management relations at United,” alluding to deals he helped secure for pilots, gate agents and baggage handlers.

Tags: UALCWA AFAIBT
Categories: Labor News

South Africa: Electrical utility workers win higher pay and right to go on strike

Labourstart.org News - Fri, 08/12/2016 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Morning Star
Categories: Labor News

ILWU Longshoremen Caucus vote to start labor-contract talks with West Coast ports

Current News - Fri, 08/12/2016 - 11:27

ILWU Longshoremen vote to start labor-contract talks with West Coast ports
http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/news/2016/08/12/west-coast-ports...

Aug 12, 2016, 7:33am PDT Updated Aug 12, 2016, 7:37am PDT

Riley McDermid
Digital Producer
San Francisco Business Times
Businesses press West Coast port unions to extend labor deal
West Coast ports, union reach contract agreement

More than 100 union dockworker delegates voted Thursday to discuss a contract extension with their West Coast port employer group, avoiding another crippling strike of the region's ports, including the Port of Oakland.

In a statement given to the Wall Street Journal, the president of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union said members were now interested in speaking to the Pacific Maritime Association about extending their contract.

Containers at the Port of Oakland were backlogged for months during labor talks in early… more

KEN JAMES / BLOOMBERG NEWS

“[There are] a wide range of concerns and opposing views on how to respond to PMA’s request,” President Robert McEllrath said in the statement. “[The vote is] a directive to go and have discussions with the PMA and report back to the membership."

Join the conversation: Follow @SFBusinessTimes on Twitter, "Like" us on Facebook and sign up for our free email newsletters.

The current ILWU-PMA contract is valid only until July 1, 2019. It encompasses 29 ports, including Oakland, Los Angeles, Long Beach, Portland and Seattle, and includes 20,000 longshoremen on the West Coast.

"Businesses that rely on the West Coast ports, which include the nation’s two largest in Los Angeles and Long Beach, have been pushing for a contract extension after protracted negotiations spanning nine months from mid-2014 to early-2015 led to epic delays," the paper reports.

"Even once the deal was reached in February, it took the ports several weeks to work through a backlog of cargo, much of which was waiting on anchored ships in the San Pedro Bay outside Los Angeles and Long Beach — the first stop for much of the containership traffic coming to the U.S. from Asia."

Crane Watch: Check out all major San Francisco construction projects

Riley covers breaking news and oversees all digital content.

Tags: ILWU Longshore CaucusContract Extension
Categories: Labor News

The Greek Panhellenic Federation of Rail Workers (POS)Railway Union to Hold 24-Hour Strike Against Privatization Plans

Current News - Fri, 08/12/2016 - 09:34

The Greek Panhellenic Federation of Rail Workers (POS)Railway Union to Hold 24-Hour Strike Against Privatization Plans
http://sputniknews.com/europe/20160706/1042497807/greece-railway-strike....
© AP Photo/ SAKIS MITROLIDIS
EUROPE
02:00 06.07.2016(updated 05:51 06.07.2016) Get short URL
015000
The Panhellenic Federation of Rail Workers (POS) said it will hold a 24-hour strike on Wednesday in protest against the government's plans to privatize national rail transport.

ATHENS (Sputnik) — The Greek TrainOSE railway company, which operates nearly all of the country's railway lines, as well as the ROSCO rail rolling stock servicing and maintenance company, are set to be privatized as part of the Tsipras government deal with international creditors to unlock further funds under the indebted country's third bailout package. The companies will put up for a tender sale on Wednesday.

"The catastrophic infrastructural sell-off is continuing. After the Port of Piraeus, the Ellinikon airport and regional airports, they are targeting public transport starting with the privatization of TrainOSE and the ROSCO rolling stock servicing company. Urban transport is next," POS said in a statement.

© AP PHOTO/ SAKIS MITROLIDIS
Civil Servants to Rally Against Bailout Deal in Athens Despite Public Disapproval
The privatization will hurt ordinary Greeks, the union said, stressing that rail fares will rise and safety will decline.
The strike was previously planned for June 22, with the date later changed alongside the date of the tender for the two companies. The Athens metro will also come to a stop, making travel to and from the Athens International Airport difficult.

The walkout follows a series of short daily strikes that has taken place each morning and evening since June 28.

© FLICKR/ DES BYRNE
Despair, Anxiety as Greece Suffers Another Year of Austerity Imposed by EU
Athens signed a deal with its creditors, which include the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the European Central Bank (ECB) and Eurozone nations, in 2015 for a third bailout package worth about 86 billion euros ($96 billion) in exchange for highly unpopular austerity reforms such as pension cuts, tax hikes and public assets privatization.

On April 8, Greece signed an agreement to sell a 67-percent share in Port of Piraeus, one of the largest ports in the world, to the Chinese shipping company COSCO Group (Hong Kong) Limited

Tags: Greek Railway Workers Unionprivatization
Categories: Labor News

South Africa: Eskom strike: Workers tell of battle for decent wages

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 08/11/2016 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Independent
Categories: Labor News

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