Labor News

Barcelona Dockworkers Refuse to Operate Police Ship Sent to Thwart Referendum

Current News - Wed, 09/27/2017 - 22:08

Barcelona Dockworkers Refuse to Operate Police Ship Sent to Thwart Referendum
http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=2443620&CategoryId=12395

BARCELONA – Barcelona dockworkers announced on Thursday that, in order to defend civil rights, they had voted not to operate a cruise ship charted by Spain’s interior ministry to house police reinforcements sent to the Catalonia region ahead of a contentious independence referendum.

The Rhapsody cruise ship, which can hold up to 2,500 passengers, was currently sat in Barcelona’s port.

“In a general assembly, Barcelona’s stevedores have voted not to operate the Rhapsody ship in defense of civil rights,” the Barcelona dockworker union, OEPB, announced on its official Twitter.

A total of four cruise ships charted by the Spanish government were sat off the coast of Catalonia to house the extra police officers sent to the affluent northeastern region of Spain.

Sources at Barcelona’s port said the stevedores’ decision would have repercussions, but pointed out that this union is usually charged with unloading cargo ships rather than cruise ships such as the Rhapsody, which does not require the same process in order to dock and unload.

Political tensions were running high in Catalonia, where the regional separatist forces are pushing for an independence referendum to be held on Oct. 1.

The move has been ruled illegal by the national government and the Spanish courts.

Pro-separatist protests escalated on Wednesday after several senior officials in the regional government were arrested during police raids to confiscate all material related to the referendum.

Tags: Barcelona Dockworkerscivil rightspolice repression
Categories: Labor News

Barcelona Dockworkers Refuse to Operate Police Ship Sent to Thwart Referendum

Current News - Wed, 09/27/2017 - 22:08

Barcelona Dockworkers Refuse to Operate Police Ship Sent to Thwart Referendum
http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=2443620&CategoryId=12395

BARCELONA – Barcelona dockworkers announced on Thursday that, in order to defend civil rights, they had voted not to operate a cruise ship charted by Spain’s interior ministry to house police reinforcements sent to the Catalonia region ahead of a contentious independence referendum.

The Rhapsody cruise ship, which can hold up to 2,500 passengers, was currently sat in Barcelona’s port.

“In a general assembly, Barcelona’s stevedores have voted not to operate the Rhapsody ship in defense of civil rights,” the Barcelona dockworker union, OEPB, announced on its official Twitter.

A total of four cruise ships charted by the Spanish government were sat off the coast of Catalonia to house the extra police officers sent to the affluent northeastern region of Spain.

Sources at Barcelona’s port said the stevedores’ decision would have repercussions, but pointed out that this union is usually charged with unloading cargo ships rather than cruise ships such as the Rhapsody, which does not require the same process in order to dock and unload.

Political tensions were running high in Catalonia, where the regional separatist forces are pushing for an independence referendum to be held on Oct. 1.

The move has been ruled illegal by the national government and the Spanish courts.

Pro-separatist protests escalated on Wednesday after several senior officials in the regional government were arrested during police raids to confiscate all material related to the referendum.

Tags: Barcelona Dockworkerscivil rightspolice repression
Categories: Labor News

Egypt: International trade unions urge Egypt to release detainees

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 09/27/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The National Post
Categories: Labor News

This Lawyer Helped Reagan Bust the Air Traffic Controllers Union. Now Trump Wants Him on the NLRB.

Current News - Wed, 09/27/2017 - 04:53

This Lawyer Helped Reagan Bust the Air Traffic Controllers Union. Now Trump Wants Him on the NLRB.
HTTP://INTHESETIMES.COM/WORKING/ENTRY/20540/RONALD-REAGAN-AIR-TRAFFIC-CONTROLLERS-UNION-BUSTING-PATCO-NLRB
THURSDAY, SEP 21, 2017, 2:25 PM
BY MICHAEL ARRIA

Members of PATCO, the air traffic controllers union, hold hands and raise their arms as their deadline to return to work passes. All strikers were fired on the order of President Reagan on August 5, 1981. (Photo: Getty Images)

Former President Ronald Reagan had a long history of clashing with organized labor, but his most infamous moment came in 1981, when he busted the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (PATCO) and fired more than 11,300 air traffic controllers who were on strike. This act weakened the power of U.S. unions and set the stage for an all-out assault on organizing rights.

Thirty-six years later, Reagan’s lead attorney in the air traffic controllers case is poised to make decisions about thousands of unfair labor practices throughout the country.

As anticipated, President Donald Trump has nominated the management-side labor attorney Peter Robb, of Downs Rachlin Martin in Vermont, to serve as general counsel for the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). This is a four-year position, and the individual who holds it is responsible for investigating unfair labor practices. Obama administration general counsel Richard Griffin’s term expires this November and, if confirmed, Robb would take over the position.

In 1981, Robb filed unfair labor practice charges against PATCO on behalf of the Federal Labor Relations Authority (FLRA) after a court ruled that the air traffic controllers’ strike was illegal. The FLRA case led to the decertification of PATCO, and Reagan subsequently banned most striking workers from federal service for their rest of their lives.

Reagan’s move set a new precedent for employers, emboldening them to attack labor more openly. In an interview with The Real News Network from 2014, Joseph McCartin, Georgetown history professor and author of Collision Course: Ronald Reagan, the Air Traffic Controllers, and the Strike that Changed America, explainedthe long-term impact. “When Ronald Reagan replaced the air traffic controllers [in] 1981, it was still not common for American employers in the private sector to deal with strikes by trying to break them and by permanently replacing workers who'd gone out on strike,” said McCartin, “Employers saw that Reagan was able to do this and, in effect, get away with it. Many private-sector employers took a similarly hard line when workers went out on strike in the private sector.”

Robb’s connections to union busting certainly don’t end with the landmark PATCO case. In 2014, he was hired by the Dominion Nuclear power plant when the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) began organizing workers. The Downs Rachlin Martin website contains a blurb boasting that Robb “represented a major national corporation in a National Labor Relations Board representation case proceeding, which had 34-days of hearing over 3 months to resolve 80 contested classifications covering hundreds of employees.”

In an interview this September, John Fernandes, a business manager for IBEW Local 457, told Bloomberg BNA that Robb represented used “scorched earth” tactics to thwart the organizing efforts. Fernandes says the plant added workers to the proposed unit in order to water down the union vote and sent videos of managers explaining the dangers of unionizing to the homes of employees. Ultimately, the plant was able to add more than 150 workers to the original petition and defeat the organizing drive.

“[Robb] handled most of the direct examinations, and his witnesses were well-schooled in advance—he’d ask one question and they’d go on forever,” Fernandes toldBloomberg BNA. “I was at a disadvantage, not being an attorney, but [the legal fees] would’ve been overwhelming for our local to pay … we certainly viewed it as union busting—it was a very long case.”

Robb also has previous connections to the NLRB. He worked as an NLRB field attorney in Baltimore during the late 1970s. He returned to the agency in 1982 as a staff lawyer and chief counsel for former member Robert Hunter. As a Republican, Hunter was an important ally to then-Chairman Donald Dotson, a staunchly anti-union member. In 1985, Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) told The Washington Post that Hunter had been the, “most loyal supporter of Donald Dotson in the transformation of the NLRB into a fundamentally anti-union entity.”

More recently, Robb’s firm harshly criticized the Obama-era NLRB, as captured in a slideshow compiled by Robb and Downs Rachlin attorney Timothy Copeland Jr. The presentation took aim at some of the pro-labor positions made by the NLRB under the previous administration. “The [Democratic] NLRB majority continues to narrowly define NLRB supervisory status, sometimes defying all common sense,” one slide reads. New Republican members are “likely to agree that the Obama board went too far,” the slideshow explained.

One of the decisions that Robb objects to is a 2014 rule that cuts back the amount of time between the filing of a unionization petition and the union vote to 11 days. The GOP has been attempting to extend the number of days to at least 35. This move would give businesses more time to construct a plan to stomp out union activity, like the aforementioned Dominion Nuclear strategy.

“The NLRB has made it clear that the intent of the new regulations is to run an election as quickly as possible which, of course, will give the employer the shortest period of time to respond to a union election petition,” Robb and three other Downs Rachlin lawyers wrote in a 2015 advisory.

The Trump administration has already quietly laid the groundwork for the NLRB to emerge as a much more business-friendly entity. This reality was underscored in August, when Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta announced that Ronald Reagan would be inducted into the department’s hall of fame. Trump’s previous NLRB nominees all have connections to union-busting, and the expected nomination of Robb would effectively make the NLRB—responsible for enforcing labor law—an anti-labor agency.

MICHAEL ARRIA
Michael Arria covers labor and social movements. Follow him on Twitter: @michaelarria

Tags: nlrbPATCOunion busting
Categories: Labor News

Former NYC TWU 100 President John Samuelsen elected as president of Transport Workers Union

Current News - Tue, 09/26/2017 - 22:14

Former NYC TWU 100 President John Samuelsen elected as president of Transport Workers Union
http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/john-samuelsen-elected-president-tra...
TWU president John Samuelsen speaking after winning his first full four-year term as president of the union.
TWU president John Samuelsen speaking after winning his first full four-year term as president of the union. (ALAN SALY)
BY
GINGER ADAMS OTIS
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Tuesday, September 26, 2017, 8:18 PM
Transport Workers Union members elected John Samuelsen to his first four-year term as president Tuesday at the union’s annual convention in Las Vegas attended by Gov. Cuomo.

Samuelsen, a former track worker who became the head of TWU Local 100, stepped into the role of international president in May 2017 when the incumbent retired mid-term.

He faced one challenger on Tuesday, Joe Campbell, former TWU chairman of the car equipment division and staffer under Samuelsen’s predecessor Roger Touissant.

Samuelsen won by a landslide, 364 to 36.

His slate won by a similar decisive margin, the union said. Cuomo spoke at the TWU convention ahead of the vote.

Samuelsen is currently embroiled in a contentious organizing drive with flight attendants at JetBlue airlines, which is based in New York

TWU has already organized two other airlines, Allegiant and Southwest.Taking aim at airlines that “act like the robber barons of the 1880s,” is a main priority for Samuelsen now that he’s got a four-year term ahead of him, he told the Daily News.

Samuelsen is battling to organize JetBlue flight attendants.
Samuelsen is battling to organize JetBlue flight attendants. (SETH WENIG/AP)
“We are investing huge amounts of resources into JetBlue. It’s top of our list,” he said.

“I have my own way of doing things, and we’re going to bring that style to the national union, and we’re going after the nearly 5,000 unorganized JetBlue flight attendants who have no union working for them,” he said.

JetBlue’s management has not been welcoming to TWU.

It began distributing flyers and emailing staffers with its own messaging — namely, that inviting in a “third-party” union was a bad idea.

Union, MTA to talk safety at hearing after worker's death

“TWU is an opportunistic and negative third party,” the airline wrote to inflight crew in a recent “Note from John,” a message from vice president John Culp.

The flyer blamed TWU’s “corporate strategists” in D.C. for stirring up drama and said the union’s leaders have a history of “criminal behavior” and labor violations.

“Keep in mind that a card is a legal document that you can’t take back: If you sign one today and change your mind tomorrow, you can't get it back. You do not need to sign a card to participate in a union election,” the “Note from John said.

Workers congratulate TWU president John Samuelsen after a landslide vote in his favor Tuesday.
Workers congratulate TWU president John Samuelsen after a landslide vote in his favor Tuesday. (PETE DONOHUE)
“Expect to hear lots of empty promises from the TWU,” it added, and warned that TWU union members are “known to harass” and use “extremely aggressive tactics.”

MTA permitted to ban transit union ads demanding pay raise

Samuelsen said the negative messaging from management was a sign his campaign was gaining ground.

“We don’t organize from the top down — this whole drive is from the ground up. We’ve met with various organizing committees in JetBlue and the JetBlue workers are doing a really good job of standing up for themselves,” he said. “This is no third-party outsider coming in to stir up trouble, it’s an employee-driven campaign to get better rights and working conditions,” he said.

JetBlue’s note also criticized TWU for abandoning other workers it organized in airlines out West and in the South.

“Other airline employees have been left high and dry by the TWU,” JetBlue wrote, pointing specifically to Allegiant and Southwest.

Transit union boss backs cheaper MetroCard fares for the poor

Samuelsen said his union had seen and already issued a rebuttal to JetBlue’s “misinformation” campaign.

The TWU has two solid contracts with Southwest covering 12,000 ground workers and 15,000 airline attendants, he said.

A JetBlue flyer to crewmembers warning them of the dangers of joining TWU.
A JetBlue flyer to crewmembers warning them of the dangers of joining TWU.(HANDOUT)
In a scenario familiar to him from his time as a track worker for NYC Transit, he said the airline had too heavy a hand with discipline of its crews.

“The ground workers in particular are having big disciplinary problems ... the bosses think they can run the crews into the ground with an oppressive management style,” he said.

NYC transit workers ratify new MTA contract increasing raises

“Until now, they’ve not met with the proper resistance, they have had it their way. Now they’re going to run into a new TWU leadership,” he said.

At Allegiant, TWU successfully organized the workers but has yet to get the airline to the table to hammer out a collectively-bargained contract.

At all three airlines, Samuelsen said, the union was planning to pour in additional resources.

“They think they can treat workers any way they want and they’ve gotten away with it for too long without facing the sharp end of a well-financed strategic campaign,” he said.

Transit Workers Union's 10-point plan to help fix NYC subways

An Allegiant spokeswoman confirmed that TWU had organized its flight attendants but had not yet gotten a contract.

“We are as committed as ever to continuing to negotiate in good faith, and are optimistic that we will have a contract soon. We are currently in mediation with a mediator from the National Mediation Board,” the spokeswoman said.

Emails to JetBlue and Southwest were not immediately returned.

Tags: TWUJohn SamuelsonTWU 100
Categories: Labor News

Former NYC TWU 100 President John Samuelsen elected as president of Transport Workers Union

Current News - Tue, 09/26/2017 - 22:14

Former NYC TWU 100 President John Samuelsen elected as president of Transport Workers Union
http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/john-samuelsen-elected-president-tra...
TWU president John Samuelsen speaking after winning his first full four-year term as president of the union.
TWU president John Samuelsen speaking after winning his first full four-year term as president of the union. (ALAN SALY)
BY
GINGER ADAMS OTIS
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Tuesday, September 26, 2017, 8:18 PM
Transport Workers Union members elected John Samuelsen to his first four-year term as president Tuesday at the union’s annual convention in Las Vegas attended by Gov. Cuomo.

Samuelsen, a former track worker who became the head of TWU Local 100, stepped into the role of international president in May 2017 when the incumbent retired mid-term.

He faced one challenger on Tuesday, Joe Campbell, former TWU chairman of the car equipment division and staffer under Samuelsen’s predecessor Roger Touissant.

Samuelsen won by a landslide, 364 to 36.

His slate won by a similar decisive margin, the union said. Cuomo spoke at the TWU convention ahead of the vote.

Samuelsen is currently embroiled in a contentious organizing drive with flight attendants at JetBlue airlines, which is based in New York

TWU has already organized two other airlines, Allegiant and Southwest.Taking aim at airlines that “act like the robber barons of the 1880s,” is a main priority for Samuelsen now that he’s got a four-year term ahead of him, he told the Daily News.

Samuelsen is battling to organize JetBlue flight attendants.
Samuelsen is battling to organize JetBlue flight attendants. (SETH WENIG/AP)
“We are investing huge amounts of resources into JetBlue. It’s top of our list,” he said.

“I have my own way of doing things, and we’re going to bring that style to the national union, and we’re going after the nearly 5,000 unorganized JetBlue flight attendants who have no union working for them,” he said.

JetBlue’s management has not been welcoming to TWU.

It began distributing flyers and emailing staffers with its own messaging — namely, that inviting in a “third-party” union was a bad idea.

Union, MTA to talk safety at hearing after worker's death

“TWU is an opportunistic and negative third party,” the airline wrote to inflight crew in a recent “Note from John,” a message from vice president John Culp.

The flyer blamed TWU’s “corporate strategists” in D.C. for stirring up drama and said the union’s leaders have a history of “criminal behavior” and labor violations.

“Keep in mind that a card is a legal document that you can’t take back: If you sign one today and change your mind tomorrow, you can't get it back. You do not need to sign a card to participate in a union election,” the “Note from John said.

Workers congratulate TWU president John Samuelsen after a landslide vote in his favor Tuesday.
Workers congratulate TWU president John Samuelsen after a landslide vote in his favor Tuesday. (PETE DONOHUE)
“Expect to hear lots of empty promises from the TWU,” it added, and warned that TWU union members are “known to harass” and use “extremely aggressive tactics.”

MTA permitted to ban transit union ads demanding pay raise

Samuelsen said the negative messaging from management was a sign his campaign was gaining ground.

“We don’t organize from the top down — this whole drive is from the ground up. We’ve met with various organizing committees in JetBlue and the JetBlue workers are doing a really good job of standing up for themselves,” he said. “This is no third-party outsider coming in to stir up trouble, it’s an employee-driven campaign to get better rights and working conditions,” he said.

JetBlue’s note also criticized TWU for abandoning other workers it organized in airlines out West and in the South.

“Other airline employees have been left high and dry by the TWU,” JetBlue wrote, pointing specifically to Allegiant and Southwest.

Transit union boss backs cheaper MetroCard fares for the poor

Samuelsen said his union had seen and already issued a rebuttal to JetBlue’s “misinformation” campaign.

The TWU has two solid contracts with Southwest covering 12,000 ground workers and 15,000 airline attendants, he said.

A JetBlue flyer to crewmembers warning them of the dangers of joining TWU.
A JetBlue flyer to crewmembers warning them of the dangers of joining TWU.(HANDOUT)
In a scenario familiar to him from his time as a track worker for NYC Transit, he said the airline had too heavy a hand with discipline of its crews.

“The ground workers in particular are having big disciplinary problems ... the bosses think they can run the crews into the ground with an oppressive management style,” he said.

NYC transit workers ratify new MTA contract increasing raises

“Until now, they’ve not met with the proper resistance, they have had it their way. Now they’re going to run into a new TWU leadership,” he said.

At Allegiant, TWU successfully organized the workers but has yet to get the airline to the table to hammer out a collectively-bargained contract.

At all three airlines, Samuelsen said, the union was planning to pour in additional resources.

“They think they can treat workers any way they want and they’ve gotten away with it for too long without facing the sharp end of a well-financed strategic campaign,” he said.

Transit Workers Union's 10-point plan to help fix NYC subways

An Allegiant spokeswoman confirmed that TWU had organized its flight attendants but had not yet gotten a contract.

“We are as committed as ever to continuing to negotiate in good faith, and are optimistic that we will have a contract soon. We are currently in mediation with a mediator from the National Mediation Board,” the spokeswoman said.

Emails to JetBlue and Southwest were not immediately returned.

Tags: TWUJohn SamuelsonTWU 100
Categories: Labor News

Korea (North): Forced labourers from North Korea help build a Danish warship

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 09/26/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Newsweek
Categories: Labor News

Qatar: HRW : Take Urgent Action to Protect Construction Workers

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 09/26/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Human Rights Watch
Categories: Labor News

South Africa: COSATU Strike and Demonstrations Against Corruption

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 09/26/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: COSATU
Categories: Labor News

Uber threatens to leave Quebec in protest at new rules for drivers

Current News - Tue, 09/26/2017 - 16:41

Uber threatens to leave Quebec in protest at new rules for drivers
Uber complains that 35-hour training requirement for drivers is unfair
Montreal mayor dismisses threat: ‘If they threaten to leave, I don’t care’
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/sep/26/uber-threatens-leave-...
Jean-Nicolas Guillemette, Uber Quebec’s general manager, said: ‘What we know for sure is that if they impose 35 hours of training on us, we’ll need to leave.’
Jean-Nicolas Guillemette, Uber Quebec’s general manager, said: ‘What we know for sure is that if they impose 35 hours of training on us, we’ll need to leave.’ Photograph: Ryan Remiorz/AP
Ashifa Kassam in Toronto
@ashifa_k
Tuesday 26 September 2017 14.15 EDTLast modified on Tuesday 26 September 2017 14.58 EDT
Uber says it will stop operating in the Canadian province of Quebec if authorities push forward with plans to demand additional training of its drivers.

Last week, the Quebec government announced legislation that would require Uber drivers to undergo 35 hours of mandatory training – an amount in line with taxi drivers in the province – rather than the 20 hours currently demanded of them.

The legislation, which would also force Uber drivers to have a criminal background check carried out by police rather than private security companies and have their cars inspected every 12 months, is expected to be tabled next week.

The new rules in Quebec come as the company wages a high-profile battle against the decision to strip it of its license to operate in London.In explaining their decision, Transport for London said that “Uber’s approach and conduct demonstrate a lack of corporate responsibility”.

Jean-Nicolas Guillemette, the general manager of Uber Quebec, said the company worried that the training requirements could deter drivers from signing up.

“Can you imagine someone on Airbnb that is renting his apartment once, twice or three times month or three times a year?” Guillemette asked. “That person would not be required to take 35 hours of training. And it’s the same situation for these drivers, working for Uber.”

Unless the province scrapped the proposed legislation, he said the service would stop operating in Quebec as of 14 October. “We’re not here to negotiate in public – we don’t think that’s the right approach,” he said. “The goal here is for us to sit down with the government and find ways that you can continue to operate. But what we know for sure is that if they impose 35 hours of training on us, we’ll need to leave.”

Uber began operating in Quebec last year, as a one-year pilot project that included what Guillemette described as the “most restrictive and severe regulations imposed on us in North America”. Across Canada, the company’s entry into the market has been met with a patchwork of rules and regulations, with a lack of provincial legislation barring it from operating in Vancouver and Winnipeg. But Quebec is the only province that requires Uber drivers to undergo training, said Guillemette.

The service has racked up nearly a million users in Quebec and counts more than 50 full-time employees in the provincial office, said Guillemette. “Every week we have about 5,000 drivers that drive on the platform – it’s the equivalent of 3,000 full-time jobs.”

Uber’s platform – which allows drivers to be assessed after every ride – enables the company to target its driver training, said Guillemette. “What we’ve developed is an ongoing training program, depending on the needs of the driver,” he said. “We fully agree that training is something that is important … but by trying to impose the same thing that is currently done in the old taxi industry, I don’t think it helps us to move forward and serve the population.”

London’s decision to strip Uber of its license has prompted scrutiny of jurisdictions around the world for insight of what happens after Uber. One of the most vibrant examples comes from Austin, Texas, where Uber’s departure last year paved the way for several other ride-share systems to emerge.

In Quebec, Uber’s threat to leave the province was met with derision by some. “I don’t care,” Denis Coderre, the mayor of Montreal, told BNN news channel. “Frankly we need to have some regulation, and if they threaten to leave I don’t care.”

Tags: Uberregulationtraining
Categories: Labor News

Uber threatens to leave Quebec in protest at new rules for drivers

Current News - Tue, 09/26/2017 - 16:41

Uber threatens to leave Quebec in protest at new rules for drivers
Uber complains that 35-hour training requirement for drivers is unfair
Montreal mayor dismisses threat: ‘If they threaten to leave, I don’t care’
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/sep/26/uber-threatens-leave-...
Jean-Nicolas Guillemette, Uber Quebec’s general manager, said: ‘What we know for sure is that if they impose 35 hours of training on us, we’ll need to leave.’
Jean-Nicolas Guillemette, Uber Quebec’s general manager, said: ‘What we know for sure is that if they impose 35 hours of training on us, we’ll need to leave.’ Photograph: Ryan Remiorz/AP
Ashifa Kassam in Toronto
@ashifa_k
Tuesday 26 September 2017 14.15 EDTLast modified on Tuesday 26 September 2017 14.58 EDT
Uber says it will stop operating in the Canadian province of Quebec if authorities push forward with plans to demand additional training of its drivers.

Last week, the Quebec government announced legislation that would require Uber drivers to undergo 35 hours of mandatory training – an amount in line with taxi drivers in the province – rather than the 20 hours currently demanded of them.

The legislation, which would also force Uber drivers to have a criminal background check carried out by police rather than private security companies and have their cars inspected every 12 months, is expected to be tabled next week.

The new rules in Quebec come as the company wages a high-profile battle against the decision to strip it of its license to operate in London.In explaining their decision, Transport for London said that “Uber’s approach and conduct demonstrate a lack of corporate responsibility”.

Jean-Nicolas Guillemette, the general manager of Uber Quebec, said the company worried that the training requirements could deter drivers from signing up.

“Can you imagine someone on Airbnb that is renting his apartment once, twice or three times month or three times a year?” Guillemette asked. “That person would not be required to take 35 hours of training. And it’s the same situation for these drivers, working for Uber.”

Unless the province scrapped the proposed legislation, he said the service would stop operating in Quebec as of 14 October. “We’re not here to negotiate in public – we don’t think that’s the right approach,” he said. “The goal here is for us to sit down with the government and find ways that you can continue to operate. But what we know for sure is that if they impose 35 hours of training on us, we’ll need to leave.”

Uber began operating in Quebec last year, as a one-year pilot project that included what Guillemette described as the “most restrictive and severe regulations imposed on us in North America”. Across Canada, the company’s entry into the market has been met with a patchwork of rules and regulations, with a lack of provincial legislation barring it from operating in Vancouver and Winnipeg. But Quebec is the only province that requires Uber drivers to undergo training, said Guillemette.

The service has racked up nearly a million users in Quebec and counts more than 50 full-time employees in the provincial office, said Guillemette. “Every week we have about 5,000 drivers that drive on the platform – it’s the equivalent of 3,000 full-time jobs.”

Uber’s platform – which allows drivers to be assessed after every ride – enables the company to target its driver training, said Guillemette. “What we’ve developed is an ongoing training program, depending on the needs of the driver,” he said. “We fully agree that training is something that is important … but by trying to impose the same thing that is currently done in the old taxi industry, I don’t think it helps us to move forward and serve the population.”

London’s decision to strip Uber of its license has prompted scrutiny of jurisdictions around the world for insight of what happens after Uber. One of the most vibrant examples comes from Austin, Texas, where Uber’s departure last year paved the way for several other ride-share systems to emerge.

In Quebec, Uber’s threat to leave the province was met with derision by some. “I don’t care,” Denis Coderre, the mayor of Montreal, told BNN news channel. “Frankly we need to have some regulation, and if they threaten to leave I don’t care.”

Tags: Uberregulationtraining
Categories: Labor News

Japan Railway Workers Union Doro-Chiba Statement International Solidarity of Workers Can Stop War on Korean Peninsula! Overthrow warmongers Trump and Abe with angry workers uprising all over the world!

Current News - Tue, 09/26/2017 - 09:07

Japan Railway Workers Union Doro-Chiba Statement

International Solidarity of Workers Can Stop War on Korean Peninsula!

Overthrow warmongers Trump and Abe with angry workers uprising all over the world!

Workers all over the world!

A fresh war—a nuclear war—is imminent. Subsequent to the war in the Middle East, now a war on Korean Peninsula is about to break out. If a war erupts, the whole East Asia would become embroiled in an awfully devastating and bloody battlefield.

 The US Trump administration and the Japanese Abe administration have taken us to the brink of nuclear war. Since the division of Korean Peninsula into North and South after World War II against the will of Korean people, the US and Japan governments have been consistently hostile to North Korea and increasing military pressure on it even after the Korean War (1950~53). The US-Japan military alliance continues to make threats even by holding “beheading operation” and “nuclear first strike” over the Kim Jong-un regime, which, in its turn, is driving it to the last extremity to arm with nuclear weapons.

 To confront this serious situation, the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions (KCTU) of South Korea issued a statement: “A nuclear showdown is not only a catastrophe for all people in both North and South but means an existential cataclysm for humankind that would spread into every corner of the world. We can never allow it to happen.” The KCTU strongly urges to rise up immediately with full force to “thoroughly get rid of the dark clouds of war looming over the Korean Peninsula and release North and South Korea from the long-years’ constraint of division.”

 Being scared by the impact of global economic crisis and Japan’s economic ruin, the Abe administration is trying to find the only way of survival in large expansion of armament and militarization of economy (dependence on war industry), revising the Constitution that would again enable Japan to launch an aggressive war in Asia. That is why Abe overtly denies the past war crimes including the comfort women issue, as if nothing had ever happened.

 Whatever the reason the Japanese government would put up, we should never allow it to embark in a war again on the Korean Peninsula and East Asia. This is the mission for us Japanese working class to be carried out resolutely.

 We declare our unity with the KCTU appeal, and are firmly determined in front of the workers all over the world that Japanese working class will overthrow the Abe administration and Japanese imperialism with our own hands.

The assaults of neoliberalism, which cares money than lives, has forcibly led to a rapid increase of massive unemployment, poverty, casualization and “karoshi” (death from overwork), and resulted in the collapse of whole social system such as education and medical care. Now, the violent practice of these onslaughts has gone far beyond the limit. Workers’ revolts for pursuing radical transformation of society have begun to spread all over the world. In the forefront, the struggle of South Korean working people has overthrown Park Geun-hye government.

 Summit talks between Trump and Abe to be held in Tokyo in November will give go-ahead to aggressive war on the Korean Peninsula. On November 5th, we will hold the annual international workers’ solidarity rally and demonstration in Tokyo together with participants from abroad to crush the Japan-U.S. summit talks for war.

 With the workers of Japan, Korea and the United States at the forefront, let’s stop the war before it starts by the strength of international solidarity and unity of workers of the whole world!

September 27th, 2017

Yasuhiro TANAKA, President of National Railway Motive Power Union of Chiba (Doro-Chiba)

Hiroyuki YAMAMOTO, General Secretary of Doro-Chiba International Labor Solidarity Committee

http://doro-chiba.org/english/english.htm

Tags: Doro-ChibaKCTUimperialismWar
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