Labor News

Georgia: Georgian workers beaten by security guard

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL
Categories: Labor News

Global: Unions Call on IMF and World Bank to Support Global Wage Rise

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITUC
Categories: Labor News

Kyrgyzstan: Trade unions vow to protect labour rights ahead of Sunday’s elections

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Equal Times
Categories: Labor News

Could this study explain why DC Metro is losing riders to Uber and Lyft? Downsizing Public Transit Leads To Privatization

Current News - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 11:05

Could this study explain why DC Metro is losing riders to Uber and Lyft? Downsizing Public Transit Leads To Privatization
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/dr-gridlock/wp/2017/10/11/could-this...

By Faiz Siddiqui October 11 at 12:00 PM

New data from the D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer shows Uber is often a faster way around the District than Metro. (Mike Blake / Reuters)
Metro is the most efficient means of commuting to and from the D.C. suburbs, but when it comes to intra-city travel — trips beginning and ending in the District — Uber is often the faster way around, according to a new analysis from the D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer. And though ride-hailing is almost always more expensive than public transit, lower-cost pooling options make it nearly as affordable to hail a car in the District as to take Metro, while adding only marginally to travel times.

According to the study, which examined travel times during afternoon rush, the duration of a commute on Metro and Uber is often similar. But variables, such as Metro delays or the night and weekend service reductions so familiar to riders, put the transit system at a disadvantage, while heavier-than-usual traffic can set back ride-hailing users.

Consider this: When the wait for a Metro train is 10 minutes, Uber is the quicker option in 99 of 114 scenarios, according to the research. (During off-peak hours, Metro trains arrive about every 12 minutes; after 9:30 p.m., the frequency is reduced to every 15 to 20 minutes, making a 10-minute wait more likely.) And even during rush hour, when service is at its peak levels, trips that would normally require a transfer on Metro generally favor Uber, according to the analysis.

Still, the study shows, when train service is frequent and reliable, Metro is the fastest way around the region. In a scenario where trains arrived every three minutes — assuming a 10-minute walk to the station — Metro matched or beat out Uber in 67 of 114 trips, according to the analysis. Trains currently arrive every eight minutes across the system, with more frequent service on the Red Line from Grosvenor to Silver Spring.

Metro is fastest for getting to the suburbs. But for travel within the District, or trips requiring a transfer, Uber is often faster and nearly as affordable, according to the study. (Screenshot: D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer).
“Metro is especially efficient for longer trips from downtown to the suburbs that do not require transfers,” the study says.

The comparison solely encompassed Uber because the ride-hailing company has made a trove of data available to city planners that makes its travel times easy to weigh against Metro’s. The app launched in January, Uber Movement, contains travel times and congestion data for select cities. Metro’s travel times were pulled from its online trip planner.

[Uber’s new tool is a glimpse of how much it knows about cities. Planners want the full picture.]

In a statement Wednesday afternoon, Metro essentially agreed with the study’s conclusions on long-distance travel but disagreed that the system falls short when it comes to trips within the District.

“While we have not analyzed the report or its assumptions, we agree that Metrorail is often faster and more cost effective than other options,” Metro spokesman Richard L. Jordan said. “In fact, Metrorail’s cost per mile is less than Uber or taxi services, regardless of the trip distance, making it an excellent value.”

In a statement, an Uber spokesman said the ride-hailing service doesn’t see Metro as a competitor.

“Uber has long believed that the Metro is, and will continue to be, the backbone of the region’s transportation system,” the spokesman said. “We are proud to provide first- [and] last-mile options that extend the reach of the public transportation infrastructure hundreds of thousands of Metro commuters rely on every day.”

Researchers said they chose the 114 routes in the analysis because they were common — with a transfer-free trips from Gallery Place or Metro Center to nearly every station in the system. Routes also included trips to common job centers — such as Foggy Bottom and Navy Yard — nightlife hubs such as Shaw, or residential and commercial areas like Columbia Heights. The researchers admit they “purposefully included some trips” where they thought Uber would beat Metro to fully demonstrate the scale of differences in travel times.

Of course, there’s often a simple way to avoid a time-consuming transfer on Metrorail: the bus. Jordan said it was “surprising” that the study didn’t “fully consider” the vast Metrobus network, as buses carry more riders than the rail system in the District — at a cost of $2 per trip.
In fact, the study’s authors did acknowledge that many of the points entailing longer commutes on Metrorail were easily connected by Metrobus.

“With Metro’s spoke-and-hub configuration, it’s not surprising that trips requiring a transfer that have origins and destinations relatively close to each other are quicker in an Uber than on Metro,” the analysis said, noting how the X2 bus, for example, links Union Station and Minnesota Avenue, and the H4 bus connects Columbia Heights and Cleveland Park. “Some folks have their own work-arounds, and might bike between these locations. All of this is to say that even if Uber is faster than Metro for trips with a transfer, there are other modes of transit a person can use to make this sort of trip.”

Uber was often the faster option for trips within the District. Here are the 10 routes where Uber is fastest compared to Metro. (Screenshot: D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer).

Metro was the faster option when there were no transfers or trips extended to the suburbs. (Screenshot: D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer).
As the authors point out, nights and weekends are likely when transit users in the District would find ride-hailing more appealing. A trip between two residential and entertainment hubs is an example. When the wait for a train is 10 minutes, the research says, the Metro trip from Columbia Heights to Eastern Market takes 47 minutes. The Uber trip clocks in at 38 minutes— nine minutes faster. If the wait for a train had only been three minutes, the authors point out, Metro would have been the faster option.

Cost is another consideration. Saving nine minutes by using Uber will cost a rider, or group of riders, an extra $10 total. But if the customer is cost-conscious, they might opt for UberPOOL, which would still take them to Eastern Market faster — in 43 minutes — for a dollar more. The study assumes an extra five minutes for UberPOOL, consistent with Uber’s predictions.

For 74 of 114 trips, the analysis concludes, Uber costs no greater than $5 more than what a rider would pay for the same Metro trip. But $5 can be a lofty sum for riders on a system where the max fare is $6.

And the current costs aren’t guaranteed.

No matter how many seats are filled in an Uber or Lyft, one thing that’s clear is that ride-hailing isn’t a feasible replacement for mass transit — as the companies themselves admit. While an Uber ride might be faster in some cases, a single Metro train can whisk more than 1,000 people from the District to the Maryland or Virginia suburbs in a matter of minutes. To attempt the same with Uber or Lyft would be a guaranteed recipe for Gridlock.“It is unclear how long Uber prices will remain this low,” the analysis notes. “Several news outlets have reported that Uber subsidizes its rides with money from investors, meaning current fares might not reflect the full cost of a ride.”

In a statement, D.C. Chief Financial Officer Jeff DeWitt said the study underscored the importance of finding a long-term funding solution for Metro, to ensure the system is safe and reliable.

“When Metro is reliable it’s the most cost effective option for riders and why it is so important the region come together on a long term funding solution,” his office said in a statement.

Tags: Public TransitDC MTAprivatization
Categories: Labor News

Could this study explain why DC Metro is losing riders to Uber and Lyft? Downsizing Public Transit Leads To Privatization

Current News - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 11:05

Could this study explain why DC Metro is losing riders to Uber and Lyft? Downsizing Public Transit Leads To Privatization
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/dr-gridlock/wp/2017/10/11/could-this...

By Faiz Siddiqui October 11 at 12:00 PM

New data from the D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer shows Uber is often a faster way around the District than Metro. (Mike Blake / Reuters)
Metro is the most efficient means of commuting to and from the D.C. suburbs, but when it comes to intra-city travel — trips beginning and ending in the District — Uber is often the faster way around, according to a new analysis from the D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer. And though ride-hailing is almost always more expensive than public transit, lower-cost pooling options make it nearly as affordable to hail a car in the District as to take Metro, while adding only marginally to travel times.

According to the study, which examined travel times during afternoon rush, the duration of a commute on Metro and Uber is often similar. But variables, such as Metro delays or the night and weekend service reductions so familiar to riders, put the transit system at a disadvantage, while heavier-than-usual traffic can set back ride-hailing users.

Consider this: When the wait for a Metro train is 10 minutes, Uber is the quicker option in 99 of 114 scenarios, according to the research. (During off-peak hours, Metro trains arrive about every 12 minutes; after 9:30 p.m., the frequency is reduced to every 15 to 20 minutes, making a 10-minute wait more likely.) And even during rush hour, when service is at its peak levels, trips that would normally require a transfer on Metro generally favor Uber, according to the analysis.

Still, the study shows, when train service is frequent and reliable, Metro is the fastest way around the region. In a scenario where trains arrived every three minutes — assuming a 10-minute walk to the station — Metro matched or beat out Uber in 67 of 114 trips, according to the analysis. Trains currently arrive every eight minutes across the system, with more frequent service on the Red Line from Grosvenor to Silver Spring.

Metro is fastest for getting to the suburbs. But for travel within the District, or trips requiring a transfer, Uber is often faster and nearly as affordable, according to the study. (Screenshot: D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer).
“Metro is especially efficient for longer trips from downtown to the suburbs that do not require transfers,” the study says.

The comparison solely encompassed Uber because the ride-hailing company has made a trove of data available to city planners that makes its travel times easy to weigh against Metro’s. The app launched in January, Uber Movement, contains travel times and congestion data for select cities. Metro’s travel times were pulled from its online trip planner.

[Uber’s new tool is a glimpse of how much it knows about cities. Planners want the full picture.]

In a statement Wednesday afternoon, Metro essentially agreed with the study’s conclusions on long-distance travel but disagreed that the system falls short when it comes to trips within the District.

“While we have not analyzed the report or its assumptions, we agree that Metrorail is often faster and more cost effective than other options,” Metro spokesman Richard L. Jordan said. “In fact, Metrorail’s cost per mile is less than Uber or taxi services, regardless of the trip distance, making it an excellent value.”

In a statement, an Uber spokesman said the ride-hailing service doesn’t see Metro as a competitor.

“Uber has long believed that the Metro is, and will continue to be, the backbone of the region’s transportation system,” the spokesman said. “We are proud to provide first- [and] last-mile options that extend the reach of the public transportation infrastructure hundreds of thousands of Metro commuters rely on every day.”

Researchers said they chose the 114 routes in the analysis because they were common — with a transfer-free trips from Gallery Place or Metro Center to nearly every station in the system. Routes also included trips to common job centers — such as Foggy Bottom and Navy Yard — nightlife hubs such as Shaw, or residential and commercial areas like Columbia Heights. The researchers admit they “purposefully included some trips” where they thought Uber would beat Metro to fully demonstrate the scale of differences in travel times.

Of course, there’s often a simple way to avoid a time-consuming transfer on Metrorail: the bus. Jordan said it was “surprising” that the study didn’t “fully consider” the vast Metrobus network, as buses carry more riders than the rail system in the District — at a cost of $2 per trip.
In fact, the study’s authors did acknowledge that many of the points entailing longer commutes on Metrorail were easily connected by Metrobus.

“With Metro’s spoke-and-hub configuration, it’s not surprising that trips requiring a transfer that have origins and destinations relatively close to each other are quicker in an Uber than on Metro,” the analysis said, noting how the X2 bus, for example, links Union Station and Minnesota Avenue, and the H4 bus connects Columbia Heights and Cleveland Park. “Some folks have their own work-arounds, and might bike between these locations. All of this is to say that even if Uber is faster than Metro for trips with a transfer, there are other modes of transit a person can use to make this sort of trip.”

Uber was often the faster option for trips within the District. Here are the 10 routes where Uber is fastest compared to Metro. (Screenshot: D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer).

Metro was the faster option when there were no transfers or trips extended to the suburbs. (Screenshot: D.C. Office of the Chief Financial Officer).
As the authors point out, nights and weekends are likely when transit users in the District would find ride-hailing more appealing. A trip between two residential and entertainment hubs is an example. When the wait for a train is 10 minutes, the research says, the Metro trip from Columbia Heights to Eastern Market takes 47 minutes. The Uber trip clocks in at 38 minutes— nine minutes faster. If the wait for a train had only been three minutes, the authors point out, Metro would have been the faster option.

Cost is another consideration. Saving nine minutes by using Uber will cost a rider, or group of riders, an extra $10 total. But if the customer is cost-conscious, they might opt for UberPOOL, which would still take them to Eastern Market faster — in 43 minutes — for a dollar more. The study assumes an extra five minutes for UberPOOL, consistent with Uber’s predictions.

For 74 of 114 trips, the analysis concludes, Uber costs no greater than $5 more than what a rider would pay for the same Metro trip. But $5 can be a lofty sum for riders on a system where the max fare is $6.

And the current costs aren’t guaranteed.

No matter how many seats are filled in an Uber or Lyft, one thing that’s clear is that ride-hailing isn’t a feasible replacement for mass transit — as the companies themselves admit. While an Uber ride might be faster in some cases, a single Metro train can whisk more than 1,000 people from the District to the Maryland or Virginia suburbs in a matter of minutes. To attempt the same with Uber or Lyft would be a guaranteed recipe for Gridlock.“It is unclear how long Uber prices will remain this low,” the analysis notes. “Several news outlets have reported that Uber subsidizes its rides with money from investors, meaning current fares might not reflect the full cost of a ride.”

In a statement, D.C. Chief Financial Officer Jeff DeWitt said the study underscored the importance of finding a long-term funding solution for Metro, to ensure the system is safe and reliable.

“When Metro is reliable it’s the most cost effective option for riders and why it is so important the region come together on a long term funding solution,” his office said in a statement.

Tags: Public TransitDC MTAprivatization
Categories: Labor News

Australia: IMF Report: Taxing the rich will reduce inequality, preserve growth

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ACTU
Categories: Labor News

Turkey: International boycott hits labor meeting in Istanbul

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Al-Monitor
Categories: Labor News

Uzbekistan: 5 Cents Per Kilo: Why Uzbek Government Still Forces People To Pick Cotton

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: RFE/RL
Categories: Labor News

Uber, Lyft reduce transit use, increase vehicle miles, report says

Current News - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:55

Uber, Lyft reduce transit use, increase vehicle miles, report says
http://www.sfchronicle.com/business/article/Uber-Lyft-reduce-transit-use...
By Carolyn SaidOctober 11, 2017
<920x1240.jpg>Photo: Richard Vogel, Associated PressNearly a quarter of ride-hailing passengers use the services daily or weekly, a study has found.
As ride-hailing has exploded in popularity, it’s caused a slight decrease in car ownership — but has also reduced use of public transit, biking and walking. The result is a likely increase in both traffic and the number of miles traveled in a vehicle, according to a national study of ride-hailing adoption from the UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies being released Wednesday.

“Although we found that ride-hailing can be complementary to transit and reduce vehicle ownership for a small portion of individuals, we found that (overall) these services currently facilitate a shift away from more sustainable modes towards low occupancy vehicles in major cities,” said Regina Clewlow, lead author of the report, in a statement.

The UC Davis study was based on a representative panel of consumers in seven major U.S. metropolitan areas. Among other findings:

•Urban Americans use ride-hailing much more than those in the suburbs. While 29 percent of city dwellers surveyed use Uber and Lyft, only 7 percent of suburban respondents do so in their hometown. Another 7 percent of suburbanites use the services when they travel elsewhere.

•Almost a quarter (24 percent) of ride-hailing passengers use the services daily or weekly.

•Parking is passengers’ top motivation for hopping into an Uber or Lyft rather than driving, with 37 percent citing this. Avoiding drinking and driving was cited by 33 percent.

•Usage is more prevalent among younger people. Among those 18 to 29, some 36 percent use ride-hailing compared with only 4 percent among those age 65 and older.

•The vast majority (91 percent) of ride-hailing customers say it has not changed whether or not they own a vehicle.

•Riders who now drive less often said they instead use ride-hailing for those trips. The report said it wasn’t possible to determine changes in net vehicle miles traveled.

•Urban ride-hailing passengers decreased their use of public transit by 6 percent. Bus and light rail service were both used less often by Uber and Lyft riders, while commuter rail saw a 3 percent bump in usage.

•Many ride-hailed trips (49 to 61 percent) would have not been made or would have occurred via walking, biking or transit.

“Ride-hailing is currently likely to contribute to growth in vehicle miles traveled in the major cities represented in this study,” the report authors wrote.

Given that likelihood, policymakers should consider giving priority to high-occupancy vehicles through methods such as congestion pricing and priority lanes, the report said.

While Uber and Lyft have extensive data on their customers, both have been reluctant to share it. That has forced lawmakers and researchers to seek other ways of discerning the services’ impacts. San Francisco has gone to court in a pending case to demand information from the companies about their use of city streets. The city also commissioned its own study about Uber’s and Lyft’s impacts on congestion, in which an outside researcher used software to query the companies’ apps every five seconds over a six-week period.

Carolyn Said is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: csaid@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @csaid

Tags: UberLyftpublic transportationprivatization
Categories: Labor News

Uber, Lyft reduce transit use, increase vehicle miles, report says-Deregulation & Privatization Brings Gridlock

Current News - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:55

Uber, Lyft reduce transit use, increase vehicle miles, report says-Deregulation & Privatization Brings Gridlock
Uber, Lyft reduce transit use, increase vehicle miles, report says
http://www.sfchronicle.com/business/article/Uber-Lyft-reduce-transit-use...
By Carolyn SaidOctober 11, 2017
<920x1240.jpg>Photo: Richard Vogel, Associated PressNearly a quarter of ride-hailing passengers use the services daily or weekly, a study has found.
As ride-hailing has exploded in popularity, it’s caused a slight decrease in car ownership — but has also reduced use of public transit, biking and walking. The result is a likely increase in both traffic and the number of miles traveled in a vehicle, according to a national study of ride-hailing adoption from the UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies being released Wednesday.

“Although we found that ride-hailing can be complementary to transit and reduce vehicle ownership for a small portion of individuals, we found that (overall) these services currently facilitate a shift away from more sustainable modes towards low occupancy vehicles in major cities,” said Regina Clewlow, lead author of the report, in a statement.

The UC Davis study was based on a representative panel of consumers in seven major U.S. metropolitan areas. Among other findings:

•Urban Americans use ride-hailing much more than those in the suburbs. While 29 percent of city dwellers surveyed use Uber and Lyft, only 7 percent of suburban respondents do so in their hometown. Another 7 percent of suburbanites use the services when they travel elsewhere.

•Almost a quarter (24 percent) of ride-hailing passengers use the services daily or weekly.

•Parking is passengers’ top motivation for hopping into an Uber or Lyft rather than driving, with 37 percent citing this. Avoiding drinking and driving was cited by 33 percent.

•Usage is more prevalent among younger people. Among those 18 to 29, some 36 percent use ride-hailing compared with only 4 percent among those age 65 and older.

•The vast majority (91 percent) of ride-hailing customers say it has not changed whether or not they own a vehicle.

•Riders who now drive less often said they instead use ride-hailing for those trips. The report said it wasn’t possible to determine changes in net vehicle miles traveled.

•Urban ride-hailing passengers decreased their use of public transit by 6 percent. Bus and light rail service were both used less often by Uber and Lyft riders, while commuter rail saw a 3 percent bump in usage.

•Many ride-hailed trips (49 to 61 percent) would have not been made or would have occurred via walking, biking or transit.

“Ride-hailing is currently likely to contribute to growth in vehicle miles traveled in the major cities represented in this study,” the report authors wrote.

Given that likelihood, policymakers should consider giving priority to high-occupancy vehicles through methods such as congestion pricing and priority lanes, the report said.

While Uber and Lyft have extensive data on their customers, both have been reluctant to share it. That has forced lawmakers and researchers to seek other ways of discerning the services’ impacts. San Francisco has gone to court in a pending case to demand information from the companies about their use of city streets. The city also commissioned its own study about Uber’s and Lyft’s impacts on congestion, in which an outside researcher used software to query the companies’ apps every five seconds over a six-week period.

Carolyn Said is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: csaid@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @csaid

Tags: UberLyftpublic transportationprivatizationgridlockderegulation
Categories: Labor News

JFK Airport guard forced to watch colleagues have sex on security cameras: suit

Current News - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:29

JFK Airport guard forced to watch colleagues have sex on security cameras: suit

BY
VICTORIA BEKIEMPIS
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Updated: Tuesday, October 10, 2017, 11:54 PM

JFK Airport guard forced to watch colleagues have sex on security cameras: suit

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/jfk-airport-guard-forced-watch-colle...

A former security guard at Kennedy Airport was forced to watch her coworkers have sex and subjected to constant sexual harassment because she rejected her boss’s advances, a new lawsuit alleges.

LaDonna Powell, 32, worked for the company now known as Allied Universal Security Services at JFK from 2012 to 2016.

Powell says she was “presented with a choice: have sex with male supervisors and get ahead, or refuse and be relentlessly harassed and retaliated against,” her Manhattan Federal Court lawsuit alleges.

Because Powell refused, she endured “harrowing” torment, she claims in the suit, which was filed Tuesday.

That torment included being “repeatedly forced to stand by as her supervisors watched her colleagues have sex in security booths via closed circuit television cameras,” according to court papers.

She was also “present while her supervisors watched videos of female security guards performing oral sex on male supervisors” and would ask about her sexual prowess, court papers state.

Once, in late 2014, a boss called Powell into his office and allegedly said "How much further do you want to go (at Allied)? ... There are things you can do to get where you want to go."

LaDonna Powell, 32, accuses Allied Universal Security Services at JFK of quid-pro-quo sex for advancement.
LaDonna Powell, 32, accuses Allied Universal Security Services at JFK of quid-pro-quo sex for advancement.(WNBC)
His “clear implication to Ms. Powell was that she could engage in sex acts to advance her career,” the suit states.

A supervisor from the Port Authority — which contracts with Allied to provide security at JFK — was there during the meeting, the Powell alleges.

Another time, the same Allied supervisor said “Since everyone already thinks we had sex, let's bend you over the table,” the documents claim.

The same man also "brushed up against Ms. Powell's body when walking past her and made unnecessary contact with her,” according to the lawsuit.

When Powell tried to report the harassment — and an allegation that a female colleague was raped by two coworkers after a work event — her complaints fell on deaf ears, she contends.

Powell, who is black, also alleges that white supervisors routinely used the N-word in the office in front of her.

NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi
A former security guard at Kennedy Airport claims in a new lawsuit she was subjected to constant sexual harassment. (ANTHONY DELMUNDO/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)
She says she was often denied meal and bathroom breaks when she worked as a security officer "to the point where, on multiple occasions, she had to urinate in a cup in the middle of her shift.”

Powell claims she made multiple complaints to Allied supervisors and the Port Authority about the alleged racial and sex discrimination at JFK.

She believes she was fired in May 2016 as retaliation and is seeking unspecified damages.

"We have just received the lawsuit and are reviewing it," Allied said in a statement, saying that "per policy we do not comment publicly on pending litigation."

Port Authority spokesman Steve Coleman declined to comment on the suit, but said the matter was referred to the agency's inspector general.

WITH DAN RIVOLI

Tags: Sexual HarassmentKennedy Airport
Categories: Labor News

Indonesia: ICTSI faces labour violations claim

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Port Strategy
Categories: Labor News

Ireland: Ryanair chaos turns tables on workers' rights

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Deutsche Welle
Categories: Labor News

Kazakhstan: Court rejects union leader’s appeal for justice

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL
Categories: Labor News

Indonesia: ITF committed to ensuring ICTSI does not extend its emerging patterns of labour violations

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITF Global Union
Categories: Labor News

Iran: Imprisoned Teachers’ Rights Advocate Esmail Abdi Denied Sentence Review

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: CHRI
Categories: Labor News

MTA, NY TWU 100 mull ditching subway booth workers for ‘ambassadors’ to boost communication with riders “They just want to combine both, where they work the platform and they also work on the other side of the turnstile,” said Kia Phua, the union’s vic

Current News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:48

MTA, transit union mull ditching subway booth workers for ‘ambassadors’ to boost communication with riders
“They just want to combine both, where they work the platform and they also work on the other side of the turnstile,” said Kia Phua, the union’s vice president of rapid transit operations. “It is a job cut.”

BY
DAN RIVOLI
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Monday, October 9, 2017, 4:00 AM
The subway station clerk soon may go the way of the token.

In what could be the beginning of the end for booth-dwelling workers, the MTA is in negotiations with the transit union to create a new title, “customer service ambassador,” with new duties, the Daily News has learned.

Ambassadors will roam stations and aid riders, in effect offering concierge services befitting the subway.

“These ambassadors will improve communication with riders by providing real-time information about the system and their commutes,” Metropolitan Transportation Authority spokesman Shams Tarek said.

It’s all part of improving customer service, Tarek said, which is key to MTA chairman Joe Lhota’s Subway Action Plan.

As they did back when riders used tokens, station agents still handle MetroCard transactions and take questions and complaints from tourists and New Yorkers alike. But in anticipation of the day when the MetroCard is retired for smart card and phone payments, and fewer people line up at booths, the MTA and the union representing transit workers have tried to negotiate new responsibilities for station agents.

Riders got their first glimpse of the new subway ambassadors at the reopening of the 53rd St. stop on the R line in Brooklyn, following the station’s six-month makeover. The workers were handing out flyers detailing the station renovations and new artwork.

MTA workers in yellow and black shirts labeled with “Customer Service Ambassador” (pictured) greeted riders after the reopening of the R train in Brooklyn in Sept. 2017. (KEVIN C. DOWNS/FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)
Commuter Will O’Connor, 42, thinks having roving workers makes more sense than the booths. He said he never goes to a booth anymore and thinks their locations are inconvenient when he needs help.

Gov. Cuomo orders panel to bust NYC gridlock, bring money to MTA

“I’ve tried to bark information to one of those booths through the turnstile,” the tech worker from Carroll Gardens said of one fruitless effort to figure out when his next train would show up.

Jean-Claude Quintyne, 25, from Crown Heights, thought it would help make his commute smoother, particularly when he’s at the busy Atlantic Ave.-Barclays Center station. The ambassador concept, Quintyne said, is a sign that the MTA is “moving to improve things, instead of trying to empty our pockets.”

Not everyone is thrilled with the plan.

Some representatives of Transport Workers Union Local 100 say the MTA is trying to cut its work force by merging the role of station agent and platform controller – who are train conductors assigned to thin crowds at stations – into a single title.

Tags: TWU 100layoffs
Categories: Labor News

MTA, NY TWU 100 mull ditching subway booth workers for ‘ambassadors’ to boost communication with riders “They just want to combine both, where they work the platform and they also work on the other side of the turnstile,” said Kia Phua, the union’s vic

Current News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:48

MTA, transit union mull ditching subway booth workers for ‘ambassadors’ to boost communication with riders
“They just want to combine both, where they work the platform and they also work on the other side of the turnstile,” said Kia Phua, the union’s vice president of rapid transit operations. “It is a job cut.”

BY
DAN RIVOLI
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Monday, October 9, 2017, 4:00 AM
The subway station clerk soon may go the way of the token.

In what could be the beginning of the end for booth-dwelling workers, the MTA is in negotiations with the transit union to create a new title, “customer service ambassador,” with new duties, the Daily News has learned.

Ambassadors will roam stations and aid riders, in effect offering concierge services befitting the subway.

“These ambassadors will improve communication with riders by providing real-time information about the system and their commutes,” Metropolitan Transportation Authority spokesman Shams Tarek said.

It’s all part of improving customer service, Tarek said, which is key to MTA chairman Joe Lhota’s Subway Action Plan.

As they did back when riders used tokens, station agents still handle MetroCard transactions and take questions and complaints from tourists and New Yorkers alike. But in anticipation of the day when the MetroCard is retired for smart card and phone payments, and fewer people line up at booths, the MTA and the union representing transit workers have tried to negotiate new responsibilities for station agents.

Riders got their first glimpse of the new subway ambassadors at the reopening of the 53rd St. stop on the R line in Brooklyn, following the station’s six-month makeover. The workers were handing out flyers detailing the station renovations and new artwork.

MTA workers in yellow and black shirts labeled with “Customer Service Ambassador” (pictured) greeted riders after the reopening of the R train in Brooklyn in Sept. 2017. (KEVIN C. DOWNS/FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)
Commuter Will O’Connor, 42, thinks having roving workers makes more sense than the booths. He said he never goes to a booth anymore and thinks their locations are inconvenient when he needs help.

Gov. Cuomo orders panel to bust NYC gridlock, bring money to MTA

“I’ve tried to bark information to one of those booths through the turnstile,” the tech worker from Carroll Gardens said of one fruitless effort to figure out when his next train would show up.

Jean-Claude Quintyne, 25, from Crown Heights, thought it would help make his commute smoother, particularly when he’s at the busy Atlantic Ave.-Barclays Center station. The ambassador concept, Quintyne said, is a sign that the MTA is “moving to improve things, instead of trying to empty our pockets.”

Not everyone is thrilled with the plan.

Some representatives of Transport Workers Union Local 100 say the MTA is trying to cut its work force by merging the role of station agent and platform controller – who are train conductors assigned to thin crowds at stations – into a single title.

Tags: TWU 100layoffs
Categories: Labor News

UK: How Uber Stalled in London

Labourstart.org News - Sat, 10/07/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: NYRB
Categories: Labor News

Puerto Rico: Teamsters Denounce False Reports of Work Stoppage by Union Drivers

Labourstart.org News - Sat, 10/07/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Teamsters
Categories: Labor News

Pages

Subscribe to Transport Workers Solidarity Committee aggregator - Labor News